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NAVAL POSTGRflDUflTC SCHOOL 

CATALOG 




ACAD€MICV€flR 1987 







NAVAL POSTGRADUATC SCHOOL 



CATALOG 




fiCflD€MIC V€flfi 1987 



TflGl€ OF CONT€NTS 

RCRDCMIC Cni€NDRft 

MISSION & HISTORY 

D€GR€€S 

SCHOLARSHIP R€QUIR€M€NTS 

COURS€ POUCICS 

RDMISSIONS 

SCHOOL STRUCTUR6 & ORGRNIZRTION 

SP€CIRL FRCILITICS 

CURRICULRR OFFIC6S & PROGRAMS 

RCRD€MIC D€PRRTM€NTS & COURS€ D€SCRIPTIONS 

FRCULTV 

INDGC 



nCADCMIC CniCNDIM 



Fall Quarter fW '87 

Reporting Date Wednesday, 24 September 1 986 

Instruction Begins Wednesday, 1 October 

Columbus Day (Holiday) Monday, 1 3 October 

Reporting Date for Refresher Thursday, 6 November 

Refresher Begins Monday, 1 November 

Veteran's Day (Holiday) Tuesday, 1 1 November 

Thanksgiving Day (Holiday) Thursday, 27 November 

Quarter Final Exams Monday - Thursday, 1 5-1 8 December 

Graduation €xercises Thursday, 18 December 

Winter Quarter fW '87 

Reporting Date Monday, 29 December 1 986 

New Vear's Day (Holiday) Thursday, 1 January 1987 

Instruction Begins Monday, 5 January 

Martin Luther King's Birthday (Holiday) Monday, 19 January 

Reporting Date for Refresher Thursday, 1 2 February 

Washington's Birthday (Holiday) Monday, 16 February 

Refresher Begins Tuesday, 1 7 February 

Quarter Final Exams Monday - Thursday, 23-26 March 

Graduation Exercises Thursday, 26 March 

Spring Quarter RV '87 

Reporting Date Monday, 23 March, 1 987 

Instruction Begins Monday, 30 March 

Reporting Date for Refresher Thursday, 7 May 

Refresher Begins Monday, 1 1 May 

Memorial Day (Holiday) Monday, 25 May 

Quarter Final 6xams Monday - Thursday, 1 5-1 8 June 

Graduation Exercises Thursday, 1 8 June 

Summer Quarter flV '87 

Reporting Date Monday, 29 June, 1 987 

Fourth of July (Holiday) Friday, 3 July 

Instruction Begins Monday, 7 July 

Reporting Date for Refresher Thursday, 1 3 Rugust 

Refresher Begins Monday, 1 7 August 

Labor Day (Holiday) Monday, 7 September 

Quarter Final Exams Monday - Thursday, 21-24 September 

Graduation Exercises Thursday, 24 September 

Fall Quarter RV '88 

Reporting Date Monday, 28 September 1 987 

Instruction Begins Thursday, 1 October 

Columbus Day (Holiday) Monday, 1 2 October 

Reporting Date for Refresher Thursday, 5 November 

Veterans Day (Holiday) Wednesday, 1 1 November 

Thanksgiving Day (Holiday) Thursday, 26 November 

Quarter Final Exams Monday - Thursday, 14-1 7 December 

Graduation Exercises Thursday, 1 7 December 




Chief of Naval Operations 
Carlisle H. Trost, ADM, USN 

CNO GRflDUfflC €DUCflTION POUCV 

Because uue face ever increasing complexities in technological, managerial, and political/ 
economic fields which affect the Navy, uue need officers with a solid intellectual capacity and the 
vision to capitalize on evolving technology and developments. This requires officers capable of 
original thought and the capacity to synthesize broad areas of knowledge, analyze complex 
issues, and appreciate the distinction between what is theoretically possible and actually 
achievable. Investment in graduate education must be pursued as a priority, even in the face of 
fiscal austerity and competing demands for our junior officers... 

The fully funded graduate education programs are intended primarily for lieutenants and lieu- 
tenant commanders who have demonstrated superior professional performance and the intellec- 
tual capability to complete a rigorous academic program. These academic programs are designed 
to equip officers with enhanced intellectual and analytical capacity and make them more skillful 
warriors and specialists. Our goal is to achieve 20 percent of the officer corps with a graduate 
level subspecialty. 

The intention of graduate education is to prepare an officer for a long career of contributions. 
Therefore, the tendency to train officers for their next assignment must be balanced by graduate 
education which furthers their ability to contribute. Program length will normally be two years or 
less to limit costs. 

Officers selected for fully funded graduate education will usually be assigned to study at the 
Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). NPS programs will be maintained with a predominant emphasis 
on scientific and engineering subjects. NPS will also provide a program of continuing education so 
prospective students can improve their knowlege and graduates can maintain currency. For those 
curricula not offered at NPS, officers will be sent to quality civilian orDoD institutions approved by 
the appropriate program sponsor. 

4 




GIMDUATC €DUCflTION 



Any Navy's ability to capitalize on new 
technology is linked to its level of officer 
competence. Accordingly, the United States 
faces a significant challenge to ensure the 
intellectual and technical competence of its 
officers. Of the military services, the Navy is 
the most hardware intensive. This fact is 
related to the broad scope of its operational 
domains: undersea, surface, air, and space. 
6ach levies significant and unique demands 
to effectively match the nation's technologi- 
cal opportunities to operational reality. This 
is a complex process that demands the high- 
est quality of intellectual and professional 
skills. 



The Navy's graduate education program 
supports fleet and shore establishment re- 
quirements for specialized education beyond 
the baccalaureate level. This education is 
directed toward filling current and future 
Navy needs in operational, technical and 
managerial areas in concert with the Officer 



Subspecialty System. Officers are educated 
to the graduate level specified by sponsors 
for optimum performance of duty in the par- 
ticular subspecialty area. Under the fully- 
funded program, officers attend school full 
time, receive all pay and benefits and have 
tuition paid by the Navy. Fully-funded grad- 
uate education is provided at the Naval Post- 
graduate School (NAVPGSCOl), Monterey, 
Cfl and selected DoD and civilian institutions 
(CIVINS). 

Utilization 

Officers who have received Navy fully- 
funded graduate education will serve one 
tour in a validated subspecialty position as 
soon as possible but not later than the sec- 
ond tour following graduation. These officers 
will serve at least two tours in related sub- 
specialty billets, and successfully completing 
a subspecialty tour will be viewed as an 
important indicator of potential for higher 
rank. 



TH€ SCHOOL AND ITS MISSION 



The Navy has developed at the Naval Post- 
graduate School an unusual academic institu- 
tion in which the special purposes of the Navy 
are served through the use of academic pro- 
grams and structure that are very similar to 
those of civilian universities. The student 
body is made up wholly of U.S. and interna- 
tional officers of the military services and fed- 
eral civilians who are being educated to fill 
the managerial and technological needs of 
the services. It must be stressed that the 
School is primarily an academic institution 
with emphasis on programs that are relevant 
to Navy interests, with an accommodation to 



unique requirements of matching, scheduling 
and sequencing officers into the programs. 

Mission: The Navy's needs for advanced ed- 
ucation of Naval Officers in the fields of sci- 
ence, engineering, operations analysis and 
management are met primarily through the 
academic programs of the Naval Postgradu- 
ate School. Complementing the School's pro- 
grams in these fields are programs at certain 
civilian universities which are preeminent in 
areas related to the interests of the Navy. 
The broad responsibility of the Naval Post- 
graduate School toward the advanced edu- 



G€N€RAl INFORMATION 



cation of naval officers is reflected in its 

stated mission: 

"To conduct and direct the advanced edu- 
cation of commissioned officers, and to pro- 
vide such other technical and professional 
instruction as may be prescribed to meet 
the needs of the Naval Service, and in sup- 
port of the foregoing; to foster and en- 
courage a program of research in order to 
sustain academic excellence." 

Goals: The mission of the Naval Postgradu- 
ate School establishes the continuing com- 
bined requirements of excellence in quality of 
academic programs and responsiveness to 
change and innovation in the technology and 
management of the Navy. The follouuing edu- 
cational goals of the School are dictated by 
this requirement: 

"To enhance continually the contribution of 



the content of the academic programs to 
the Navy and the Department of Defense. 

"To intensify efforts to provide the best 
education to the students of the Naval 
Postgraduate School, and to build a pro- 
gressively better environment where facul- 
ty and students can come together in the 
search for knowledge and professional ex- 
cellence. 

"To nurture in students a respect for rigor in 
thought and discipline in work which will be 
a hallmark of their pursuit of excellence in 
their professions. 

"To attract faculty who by their scholar- 
ship and fresh viewpoint will bring new life 
to the classroom, new vigor to the labora- 
tory and through their research sustain a 
program of academic excellence." 



FROM TH€ B€GINNING 



The Naval Postgraduate School is in its 
77th year of operation. The development of a 
naval institution of higher learning dedicated 
to the advanced education of commissioned 
officers began on 9 June 1 909 when the Post- 
graduate Department of the U.S. Naval Acad- 
emy was established at Annapolis. Ten offi- 
cers made up the first class, three professors 
formed the faculty, and marine engineering 
was the one course of study. In 1919, the 
postgraduate department was renamed the 
United States Naval Postgraduate School, 
but still operated as a part of the Naval 
Academy. 

UJith the advent of World UJar II, the School's 
activities increased substantially. There was 
a large growth in student enrollment and 
educational programs were expanded to 
meet the evolving needs of the Navy. Follow- 
ing the end of the War, plans were initiated 
to move the School to more suitable facil- 
ities and to enhance its academic status. 

Between 1 945 and 1 948, Congress estab- 
lished the School as a separate activity under 
its own Superintendent, created the office of 
Academic Dean and granted the Superinten- 
dent the authority to award the bachelor's, 



master's and doctor's degrees. It also ap- 
proved Monterey as the future home of the 
School. The Navy officially established the 
School on the West Coast on 22 December 
1951. With its enlarged facilities, the School 
continued to grow in curricular programs and 
in student enrollment. In 1 956, the Navy Man- 
agement School was formed as a component 
of the Postgraduate School to provide grad- 
uate education in the theory and application 
of administrative science. 

Currently, the Naval Postgraduate School 
graduates approximately 800 students per 
year and offers a range of curricular programs 
specifically tailored to impart the scientific, 
engineering, operational and administrative 
knowledge required to meet the present and 
projected professional needs of the Deport- 
ment of Defense. Its student body includes 
officers of all five U.S. services and approx- 
imately 25 allied services. U.S. Naval Officers 
constitute 60% of the student body, with 23% 
coming from other U.S. Services. The remain- 
ing 1 7% is made up of foreign officers. Also, 
since 1975, the Postgraduate School has en- 
rolled civilian employees of the U.S. Federal 
Government. 



G6N€RAL INFORMATION 



D€GR€€S 



The Naval Postgraduate School is autho- 
rized to confer Bachelor's, Master's, engi- 
neer's and Doctor's degrees upon qualified 
graduates. Recipients of such degrees must 
be found qualified by the Academic Council in 
accordance with prescribed academic stan- 
dards. 

RCCR€DITRTION 

The Naval Postgraduate School is accred- 
ited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior 
Colleges and Universities of the UJestern As- 
sociation of Schools and Colleges, engineer- 
ing curricula accredited by the Accrediting 
Board for engineering and Technology (AB6T) 
are Aeronautical, electrical and Mechanical. 
Degrees offered in engineering Science and 
engineering Technology ore not accredited 
by ABCT. The Administrative Science Curricula 
meets the standards of the National Associa- 
tion of Schools of Public Affairs and Adminis- 
trators. 

MRSTCR'S D€GR€€S 

Requirements for the Master of Arts and 
Master of Science Degrees: 

The Master's Degree may be awarded for 
successful completion of a curriculum which 
has the approval of the Academic Council as 
meriting the degree requirements. Such curric- 
ula shall conform to current practice in accred- 
ited institutions and shall contain a well- 
defined major. 

General Postgraduate School minimum re- 
quirements for the Master's Degree are as 
follows: 

1 . 32 quarter hours of graduate level cred- 
its for which at least 20 quarter hours 
must be earned on campus. 

2. A thesis, or its equivalent, is required. If 
the thesis is waived, at least 8 quarter 
hours of approved courses, 4000-4999, 
or comprehensive examinations, shall 
be substituted for it. 

3. Departmental requirements for the de- 
gree in a specified subject. 

4. A quality point rating of at least 3.00 in 
all graduate courses in the curriculum, 
and either 2.50 in the remaining courses 
or 2.75 in all courses in the curriculum. 



Master of Arts Degrees Offered 

National Security Affairs 

Master of Science Degrees Offered 

Aeronautical engineering 
Applied Mathematics 
Applied Science 
Computer Science 
electrical engineering 
engineering Acoustics 
engineering Science 
Hydrographic Sciences 
Information Systems 
Management 
Mathematics 
Material Science 
Mechanical engineering 
Meteorology 

Meteorology and Oceanography 
National Security Affairs 
Oceanography 
Operations Research 
Physics 

Systems Technology 
Systems engineering 
Telecommunications Systems 
Management 

Master's Degrees with Distinction 

The award of the Master of Science and the 
Master of Arts degrees may be made "With 
Distinction" when a student completes the 
degree requirements with a minimum of 32- 
quarter hours earned in residence and is 
judged to be in the upper 10% of the grad- 
uating class from the student's department. 

€NGIN€€R S D€GR€€S 

Requirements: The engineer's Degree typ- 
ically represents one year of study beyond 
the Master's Degree. It is awarded for succes- 
sful completion of a curriculum which has the 
approval of the Academic Council as meriting 
the degree. 

Minimum Postgraduate School require- 
ments for the degree of engineer are as fol- 
lows: 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



1. 72 quarter hours of graduate level 
courses, including at least 30 hours in 
courses 4000-4999. 

2. Rn acceptable thesis. 

3. One academic year in residence. 

4. Departmental requirements for the de- 
gree in a specified engineering field. 

5. fl quality point rating of at least 3.00 in 
all graduate courses in the curriculum, 
and either 2.50 in the remaining courses 
or 2.75 in all courses of the curriculum. 

engineer's Degrees Offered 

Reronautical €ngineer 
Electrical Engineer 
Mechanical Engineer 

DOCTOR'S D€GR€€S 

Requirements: Rny program leading to a 
Doctor's Degree shall require the equivalent 
of at least three academic years of study be- 
yond the baccalaureate level, with at least 
one academic year being spent at the School. 
R requirement for admission is a Bachelor's 
degree that includes the prerequisites for full 
graduate status in the department of his 
major study. 

R general outline of a candidate's pro- 
gress through the program is as follows: 

a. Rpplication to the appropriate depart- 
ment and successful completion of a 
screening exam. 

b. Rppointment of the student's doctoral 
committee, which bears responsibility 
for the study program and guidance of 
the research program. 

c. Inclusion of one or more minors in the 
study program. 

d. For the Doctor of Philosophy, a foreign 
language requirement may be included 
at the discretion of the major depart- 
ment; for the Doctor of Engineering, 
demonstrated proficiency in computer 
programming is required. 

e. When the study program is essentially 
finished, successfully complete the 
qualifying examination, including both 
oral and written parts. 



f. Rdmission to candidacy and work on a 

doctoral dissertation on a subject ap- 
proved by the doctoral committee. 

g. Upon completion of the dissertation 
and acceptance by the doctoral com- 
mittee, administration of a final oral 
examination. 

h. Upon unanimous recommendation of 
the doctoral committee, the Rcademic 
Council recommends award of the 
degree. 

Doctorates Offered 

Doctor of Philosphy in: 
Reronautical Engineering 
Computer Science 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Engineering Rcoustics 
Mechanical Engineering 
Meteorology 
Oceanography 
Operations Research 
Physics 

Doctor of Engineering in: 
Reronautical Engineering 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

POSTGRADURT€ SCHOOL 
STATISTICS 

Graduate degrees granted by NPS since 
1 946 are given in the following table to pro- 
vide perspective. Two of the degrees are no 
longer offered: Master of Science in Chimistry 
and the undesignated Master of Science De- 
gree. R third, Master of Science in Computer 
Systems Management, has been changed to 
Master of Science in Telecommunication Sys- 
tem Management. Growth in program offer- 
ings is evident as the figures are tracked from 
left to right. Between 1955 and 1965 the 
range of degrees doubled, and by 1 975 they 
had increased again by nearly the same num- 
ber. UUithin recent years the populations and 
offerings have, on an overall basis, been 
stable. 



G€N€RAl INFORMATION 



POSTGRRDURT6 SCHOOL STATISTICS 
GRRDURTC D€GR€€S GRRNTC-D BY CfilCNDRR V€RRS 



1946- 1956- 1966- 1976- 1984 1985 TOTAL 
1955 1965 1975 1983 



M.A. in National Security Affairs 

M.S. in Aeronautical engineering 

M.S. in Applied Mathematics 

MS. in Applied Science 

M.S. in Chemistry 

M.S. in Computer Science 

M.S. in Computer Systems 

Management 

M.S. in electrical engineering 229 

M.S. in Engineering Acoustics 

M.S. in engineering Science 

M.S. in Hydrographic Sciences 

M.S. in Information Systems 

M.S. in Management 

M.S. in Material Science 

M.S. in Mechanical engineering 56 

M.S. in Meteorology 42 
M.S. in Meteorology and 

Oceanography 

M.S. in National Security Affairs 

M.S. in Oceanography 

M.S. in Operations Research 

M.S. in Physics 25 

M.S. in Systems engineering 

M.S. in Systems Technology 

M.S. in Telecommunications 

Systems Management 

Master of Science 1 7 



Total Master's Degrees 369 



Aeronautical engineer 
electrical engineer 
Mechanical engineer 



Total engineer's Degrees 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of engineering 



Total Doctorates 

TOTAL GRADUATC DCGRCCS 369 





23 


486 


95 


78 


682 


40 


339 


236 


45 


42 


702 






11 




2 


13 






43 


1 


2 


46 


21 


48 








69 




173 


256 


48 


47 


524 


22 


541 


210 






773 


314 


663 


516 


62 


85 


1,869 




50 


50 


11 


7 


118 






80 


23 


13 


116 






5 


6 


7 


18 






127 


58 


82 


267 


406 


1,597 


1,086 


165 


139 


3,393 


5 


9 








14 


97 


231 


253 


44 


39 


720 


93 


179 


46 


6 


9 


375 






90 


29 


17 


136 




298 


97 


2 


6 


403 


63 


854 


461 


62 


58 


1,498 


239 


226 


126 


16 


27 


659 








14 


9 


23 




19 


364 


59 


71 


513 






72 


18 


18 


108 


167 


81 


5 






270 


1.467 


5,331 


4,620 


764 


758 


1 3,309 


4 


78 


29 


2 


4 


117 




104 


58 


4 


4 


170 




31 


44 


7 


8 


90 


4 


213 


131 


13 


16 


377 


15 


63 


37 


1 


7 


123 






3 


2 




5 


15 


63 


40 


3 


7 


128 


1,486 


5,607 


4,791 


780 


781 


13,814 



G6N6RAL INFORMATION 



AWARDS FOR GRADUATES 



ADMIRAL WILLIAM ADGCR MOFFCTT AULIARD 

This award is presented annually by the 
Point Lobos Section of the American Institute 
of Aeronautics and Astronautics to on out- 
standing graduate of the Aeronautical €ngi- 
neering curriculum. The award is made on the 
basis of the student's academic excellence, 
including thesis, and his career potential. 

ARMV CHI6F OF STAFF AWARD FOR 
6XC6LL6NC6 IN OPCRRTIONS R6S6RRCH 

Presented semiannually to a U.S. Army Of- 
ficer student in the Operations Analysis Pro- 
gram who possessed an outstanding aca- 
demic record, including thesis and project 
work, and who demonstrates qualities indica- 
tive of an outstanding military officer. 

ARM6D FORCCS COMMUNICATIONS AND 
6L6CTRONICS RSSOCIRTION HONOR AWARD 

Presented to that officer graduate who has 
achieved academic excellence and best 
demonstrated professional qualities in one 
of the following programs: electronics, Com- 
munications, Intelligence, Command and Con- 
trol, or Computer Technology. 

ASTRONAUT MICHA6L J. SMITH, CDR, USN, 
ASTRONAUTICS AWARD 

Astronaut and CDR Michael J. Smith, who 
was an aluminus of NPS gave his life exploring 
space for the enrichment of mankind. This 
award is presented annually by the Point 
Lobos Section of the American Institute of 
Aeronautics and Astronautics to an outstand- 
ing graduate of the Space Systems engineer- 
ing or Space Systems Operations curricula. 
The award is made on the basis of the stu- 
dent's academic excellence, including thesis, 
and his career potential. 

CAPTAIN JOHN C. WOCLF6L AWARD 

Presented each June to the outstanding 
Naval engineering program officer student on 
the basis of academic and leadership quali- 
ties and performance. Officers from the past 
September, December, March and June grad- 
uation classes were considered. 



TH6 CHICF OF NAVAL OP6RATIONS AWARD 

FOR 6XC6LLCNC6 IN 

ORGANIZATIONAL DCVCLOPM6NT 

This award is presented semiannually for 
academic excellence to the most outstanding 
graduate of the Human Resources Manage- 
ment Curriculum. 

CHI6F OF NAVAL OP6RATIONS 
ANTISU8MARINC WARFAR6 AWARD 

Sponsored by the National Security Indus- 
trial Association and presented in recogni- 
tion of distinguished academic achievement 
to that ASW Curriculum graduate who has 
demonstrated outstanding academic per- 
formance and exhibited those qualities indic- 
ative of on outstanding military officer. 

CHICF OF NAVAL OP6RATIONS 
COMMUNICATION AWARD 

Presented in recognition of distinguished 
academic achievement in the Communica- 
tions engineering or Telecommunications 
Systems programs to that graduate who has 
attained an outstanding academic record 
and who exhibits those qualities of an out- 
standing military officer. 

CHICF OF NRVAL OPERATIONS AWARD FOR 

exceLLCNce in manpower, PERSONNEL AND 

TRAINING ANALVSIS 

This award is given semiannually to a U.S. 
Navy, or OP-01 sponsored civilian, graduate 
of the Manpower, Personnel and Training 
Analysis curriculum who has demonstrated 
outstanding academic performance, thesis 
quality and leadership potential. 

CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS AWARD FOR 
EXCELLENCE IN OPERATIONS R6S6ARCH 

Presented semiannually to the outstand- 
ing USN or USMC graduate of the Operations 
Research Program on the basis of academic 
achievement, experience tour performance, 
thesis work and demonstration of those qual- 
ities indicative of the outstanding military of- 
ficer. 



10 



G6N6RRL INFORMATION 



DCPRRTM6NT OF TH€ NflW RUURRD FOR 

RCRD6MIC CXCCLLCNCC IN FINRNCIRL 

MRNRGCMCNT 

This award is presented semiannually to a 
financial management student who demon- 
strates overall academic performance, aca- 
demic excellence in financial management 
courses, high leadership potential, future 
ability to contribute to professional, academ- 
ic and public forums while meeting the high- 
est standards of stewardship of the National 
Trust, and thesis excellence. 

JOINT CHICFS OF STRFF COMMRND, CONTROL 

RND COMMUNICATIONS RUURRD FOR 

RCRD6MIC RCHICV6M6NT 

Presented to the outstanding graduate of 
the Command, Control and Communications 
Program in recognition of distinguished aca- 
demic achievement based upon grades ob- 
tained, quality of thesis and overall perfor- 
mance. 

M6UUBORN STUD6NT R6S6RRCH RUURRD 

Presented annually to an officer student 
whose thesis exhibits sound scholarship and 
highest research ability. Criteria of selection 
conforms as nearly as possible to the concept 
of "evidence of research potential" which 
forms the basis for election to Rssociate 
Membership in the Society of Sigma Xi. 



NRVRL SCR SVST6MS COMMRND RUURRD 
IN NRVRL CNGIN66RING 

Presented in recognition of distinguished 
academic achievement in the Naval engineer- 
ing Program. The criteria for the award in- 
cludes demonstrated academic excellence 
measured by grades attained, quality of 
thesis and demonstrated leadership poten- 
tial in Naval engineering. 



NRVRL SCR SVSTCMS COMMRND RUURRD FOR 

UUCRPON SVSTCMS CNGIN66RING 

6XC6LL6NCC 

Presented in recognition of distinguished 
scholastic achievement in a UUeapons engine- 
ering field of study. Selection is based on 
grades attained, quality and applicability of 
thesis and demonstrated leadership poten- 
tial in the field of UUeapons engineering. 



NRVRL SUPPLV SVSTCMS RUURRD FOR 

RCRDeMIC eXCCLLCNCe IN RDMINISTRRTIVC 

SCICNC6 

Presented annually to an outstanding U.S. 
Navy Supply Corps officer in Administrative 
Science. This award is made on the basis of 
academic achievement, research excellence, 
and contribution to the professional and civil- 
ian community. 



MILITRRV OP6RRTIONS R6S6RRCH SOCICTY 
GRRDURTC RCSCRRCH RUURRD 

Presented in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in graduate research directed 
toward improving military force utilization. 
The primary award criterion is research which 
leads to demonstration of, or potential for, in- 
creased operating effectiveness of currently 
available or near term assets. 



MONT6R6V PCNINSULR COUNCIL NRW 

L6RGUC RUURRD FOR HIGHCST RCRDCMIC 

RCHICVCMCNT 

Presented to the graduating USN, USMC or 
USCG officer who has maintained the highest 
academic grade average as a student at the 
Naval Postgraduate School. 



NRVRL SURFRCC UU6RPONS C6NT6R RUURRD 

FOR CXC6LL6NCC IN SURFRCC UURRFRR6 

T6CHNOLOGV 

Presented semiannually to a U.S. officer of 
high academic standing whose thesis topic 
and quality of supporting research demon- 
strates the greatest.potential for contribution 
to surface warfare. 



NRVRL UNDCRUUflTCR SVSTCMS C6NTCR 

RUURRD FOR 6XCCLL6NCC IN UND6RUURTCR 

SVSTCMS TCCHNOLOGY 

Presented annually to the student, who by 
academic standing and relevance of thesis 
topic, has demonstrated the greatest 
achievement in the field of Underwater 
Systems Technology. 



11 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



OCERNOGRRPHER OF THE NRW RIR-OCCRN 
SCIENCE RUURRD 

Presented to a U.S. Naval officer graduate 
of the Rir-Ocean Science Program uuho has 
demonstrated outstanding performance and 
exhibited those qualities indicative of an out- 
standing military officer. 

R6RR RDMIRRL GRRCE MURRRV HOPP6R 
RUURRD FOR COMPUTER T6CHNOLOGV 

Presented to a graduating USN, USMC or 
USCG officer on the basis of thesis quality, 
academic performance and demonstrated 
leadership ability in the study of computer 
technology. 

RERR RDMIRRL THOMRS R. MCCL6LLRN 

RUURRD FOR RCRDEMIC EXCELLENCE IN 

RDMINISTRRTIVE SCIENCE 

Presented to a graduate of Rdministrative 
Science based upon academic performance, 
professional commitment, and leadership 
potential. 

RECONNRISSRNCE ELECTRONICS LURRFRRE 
SP6CIRL OP6RRTIONS NRW RUURRD 

Presented in recognition of academic 
achievement in the Electronic UUarfare 
Systems Technology Program to that grad- 
uate uuho has attained an outstanding aca- 
demic record and uuho has exhibited out- 
standing leadership qualities. 



SIGMR XI 

The Naval Postgraduate School has a 
Chapter of the Society of the Sigma XI, an 
honorary society founded to recognize excel- 
lence in the scientific and engineering disci- 
plines. Students uuho have demonstrated 
marked promise in their research uuork are 
considered for membership each year. The 
number elected is limited only by the quality 
of the research uuork done for a graduate de- 
gree. 

SPRCE RND NRVRL LURRFRRE SVST6MS 

COMMRND RUURRD IN ELECTRONICS SVST6MS 

ENGINEERING 

Presented semiannually to a U.S. Navy Of- 
ficer student in recognition of distinguished 
academic achievement in the advanced Elec- 
tronics Engineering program. 

UNITED STRTES NRVRL INSTITUTE RUURRD 

Presented each quarter to that recipient of 
a master's degree in National Security Rffairs 
uuhose achievement has significantly ad- 
vanced professional, literary or scientific 
knouuledge in the naval or maritime services. 

LURRREN RRNDOLPH CHURCH RUURRD 

Presented annually to an officer student for 
outstanding performance in mathematics. 
The criteria for selection includes evidence of 
initiative, scholarly attitude and mathemati- 
cal maturity. 




12 



G6N6RRI INFORMATION 



GRRD€S 



Student acodemic performance is evaluated in terms of quality points assigned to the letter 
grade achieved in a course. Based on the level of achievement associated with each letter grade, 
the corresponding quality point values range from a maximum of 4 to a minimum of as follows: 



Grade 


Point Value 


A 


4 


R- 


3.7 


8+ 


3.3 


B 


3 


B- 


2.7 


C+ 


2.3 


C 


2 


c- 


1.7 


D+ 


1.3 


D 


1 


X 






Letter designations for which no quality points are assigned are given as follows: 



uu 


UUithdrew 


N 


Ungraded 


P 


Pass 


F 


Fail 



The grade of Incomplete is given when an 
identifiable portion of the course remains 
undone at the end of the quarter. One addi- 
tional quarter is granted to submit the delin- 
quent work. If the I is not removed within the 
twelve weeks following the end of the term 
in which it was assigned, it becomes an X. 

R student may withdraw from a course up 
to the end of the second week of the quarter 
without any record of it showing on the trans- 
cript. Withdrawals may be made after that up 
to the end of the eighth week of the quarter, 
but a grade of UU is entered for the course on 
the transcript. No withdrawals can be made 
after the eighth week. 

Courses may be designated for P and F 
grading when approved by the Academic 
Department and the Academic council. A stu- 
dent in a degree program who wishes to take 
courses not in his normal program may elect 
to take them in the Pass/Fail mode. Approval 
must be granted by the student's 
cognizant Curricular Office and Department 
Chairman. It is the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to exercise the P/F option by informing 



the instructor in writing at the time of enroll- 
ment that a P/F grade is desired. A copy of 
the approved request shall be forwarded to 
the Registrar. Students electing to receive 
the P/F grade in letter graded courses may 
not apply the hours toward the degree and 
curriculum requirements of any program. 



QUALITY POINT RATING 
QPR 

When the quarter-hour credit of a course is 
multiplied by the point value of the student's 
grade, a quality point value for the student's 
work in the course is obtained. The sum of the 
quality points for all courses divided by the 
sum of the quarter-hour credit of these 
courses gives a weighted numerical evalua- 
tion of the student's performance, termed the 
Quality Point Rating (QPR). R student 
achieving a QPR of 3.0 has maintained a B 
average in all courses undertaken with a 
proper weight assigned for course hours. 



13 



G€N€flAl INFORMATION 



COURSES 



Courses are designated by an alphanumer- 
ic symbol consisting of two letters and four 
numbers. The first two letters designate the 
academic department which offers the course, 
and they are defined as follows: 



half the value shown in calculating quarter 
hours for the credit value of the course. Thus 
a (3-2) course, having three hours lecture and 
two hours laboratory, will be assigned a cred- 
it value of 4 quarter hours. 



Administrative Sciences 




Service Courses 


AS 


Telecommunications Systems 




Management 


CM 


Defense Communications 


CO 


Information systems 


IS 


Management 


MN 


Aeronautics 


AC 


Antisubmarine UUarfare 


ST 


Command, Control 




And Communications 


CC 


Computer Science 


CS 


electrical and Computer 




Engineering 


ec 


electronic UUarfare 


euu 


Mathematics 


MA 


Mechanical engineering 


Me 


Materials Science 


MS 


Meteorology 


MR 


National Security Affairs 


NS 


Oceanography 




Oceanographic Sciences 


OC 


Hydrographic Sciences 


GH 


Operations Research 




Operations Analysis 


OA 


Service Courses 


OS 


Physics 


PH 


Chemistry 


CH 


Science And engineering 


se 



Courses are assigned numbers in accordance 
with their level of academic credit. 

0001-0999 No credit 

1000-1999 Lower division college credit 
(Freshman - Sophmore Level) 

2000-2999 Upper division college credit 
(Junior - Senior level) 

3000-3999 Upper division college or grad- 
uate credit 

4000-4999 Graduate credit 

following the course designator are two num- 
bers in parenthesis separated by a hyphen 
which indicate the hours of instruction per 
week in the classroom and in the laboratory 
respectively. Laboratory hours are assigned 



COURSC REGISTRATION 
AND CftCDIT 

Cach student must be registered in each 
course in which he/she is a candidate for 
credit not later than the end of the second 
week of the term. No student will receive 
credit for a course unless registration in that 
course has been approved by one of the fol- 
lowing: his curricular officer or academic asso- 
ciate, the chairman of his doctoral committee, 
or the Dean of Academic Administration. 

Overload: A student may not enroll for more 
than 21 total credit hours or more than four 
3000 and/or 4000 courses (excluding lab- 
oratories or explicit curriculum requirements) 
per quarter unless he has either a total QPR 
of at least 3.50 or permission of the Depart- 
ment or Group Chairman and the Dean of Aca- 
demic Administration. 

Repetition of Courses: A student may re- 
peat a course for the purpose of improving 
his/her grade when the grade received orig- 
inally was either D or X, provided such course 
repetition is taken at the Postgraduate 
School. Approval must be granted by both the 
Curricular Officer and the Department Chair- 
man concerned, and the Registrar is to be 
notified. 

For record purposes, both the original and 
the repeated courses are to be shown on the 
transcript. For Quality Point Rating computa- 
tion, the credit hours of the course shall be 
counted once with the quality points earned 
being the average of the two. 

Auditing: eligible persons will be allowed to 
audit courses on a space-available basis with 
the approval of the professor teaching the 
course and the Curricular Office if appropriate. 



14 



G6N6RRL INFORMATION 



When approval is obtained to audit, students 
may attend classes, but they have no entitle- 
ment to submit papers, questions, or tests for 
grading nor consume the instructor's time out- 
side of class. Auditors will receive no grade 
Por the course, no credit toward graduation 
and no Pormal recognition oP accomplishment 
Por courses they have audited. 

Medical Absence: The academic record oPa 
student may be deleted completely Por a 
given term when he/she is absent Por a por- 
tion oP the term Por medical reasons. The 
transcript will show, "Excused Por the term Por 
medical reasons." The student shall not be 
permitted to delete only a portion oP his/her 
courses Por this reason. The grade "UU" shall 
be used when it is necessary to withdraw 
Prom only a part oP the student's program. 
Such excusals shall be requested by the Cur- 
ricular OPPicer and approved by the Dean oP 
Academic Administration. 

Credit by examination: The award oP credit 
solely on the basis oP examination Por any 
1000 or 2000 level course is permissible. 
Grades Por such courses shall be awarded on 
a Pass/fail basis. 



VALIDATION 

A student with the appropriate background 
may validate a course that is required Por his/ 
her curriculum. Validation will allow the stu- 
dent to omit that course Prom the program 
oP study,- however, no credit will be granted 
Por a course that has been validated. The 
basic purpose oP course validation is to moke 
optimal use oP the student's time at the Naval 
Postgraduate School. 6very validation must 
be justiPied by documented evidence oP prior 
work in the area oP the course to be val- 
idated. 

The validation oP a course must be approved 
in writing by the chairman oP the deportment 
oPPering the course or by someone desig- 
nated in writing by the chairman to act Por 
him/her in this regard. SpeciPic criteria Por val- 
idation (e.g., review oP the student's trans- 
cripts or examination on the material oP the 
course) are lePt to the discretion oP the cogni- 
zant department chairman. 

After validating one or more courses, it is 
appropriate Por a student to complete his/her 
program in less than the maximum time 
allowed. 



ADMISSIONS 



U.S. Navy oPPicers interested in attending 
one oP the curricula oPPered at the Naval Post- 
graduate School are rePerred to OPNflVINST 
1520.23 and to the latest OPNflVNOT€ 
1 520. These documents provide inPormation, 
policy, and procedural guidance Por the 
Navy's graduate education program. 

S€l€CTION PROC€DUR€S 

Selection Por Navy Punded graduate educa- 
tion is based on academic capability, out- 
standing proPessional perPormance, promo- 
tion potential and a strong educational back- 
ground. OPficers normally will complete at 
least one tour of duty prior to entering grad- 
uate school. 

Documented academic performance in vol- 
untary education programs offered by 
NAVPGSCOL self-study courses or CMNS will 
enhance selection opportunity. Commis- 
sioned officers not yet selected for graduate 



education are encouraged to take the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GR6) General 
Test at their own expense and report scores 
to COMNRVMIIP6RSCOM and NAVPGSCOL 
by entering both Code R5806-5 and Code 
R4831-4 in block 1 3 of the registration form. 
The GR6 is available through the Defense 
Activity for Non-Traditional education Sup- 
port (DANT6S) or the Navy Campus. In cases 
where scores are provided, they will be used 
in conjunction with the Academic Profile Code 
(APC) to assess the officer's academic cap- 
ability. The additional information may en- 
hance selection opportunity, particularly in 
the case of individuals whose undergraduate 
performance is not indicative of academic 
potential. 

Officers selected for fully funded graduate 
education will be notified by 
COMNAVMILPCRSCOM. Notification will in- 
clude curriculum options for which the officer is 
eligible by virture of designator and RPC. 



15 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



TRBL€ OF IKflD€MIC PROFILE COD€ DIGITS 



The Rcademic Profile Code (RPC) is o three- 
digit number that summarizes pertinent por- 
tions of o Naval officer's prior college perfor- 
mance and is an important factor in the Navy's 
graduate education selection process. The 
Naval Postgraduate School computes RPC's 
uuithin two years after commissioning for offi- 
cers of most Navy communities. R detailed 
description of the RPC system is also found in 
OPNRVNOTE 1520. Briefly, the three inde- 
pendent digits reflect an individual's cumula- 
tive grade-point average (QPR), perfor- 
mance in calculus related mathematics 
courses, and qualifications in selected sci- 
ence/engineering areas. 



First Digit 

The first digit indicates overall academic 
performance and is derived from the follow- 
ing table: 



Dde 


QPR Range 





3.60-4.00 


1 


3.20-3.59 


2 


2.60-3.19 


3 


2.20-2.59 


4 


1.90-2.19 


5 


0-1.89 



(Failures and repeated courses are included 
in the QPR calculation.) 



R Technical Code of 1 or ordinarily is as- 
signed only to an officer whose undergrad- 
uate major was Physics or Reronautical, Elec- 
trical, or Mechanical engineering. Exceptions 
are made for those desiring to attend civilian 
colleges for studies in other technical areas; 
for example, officers of the Civil Engineering 
Corps. Officers in this category, other than 
CEC members, should contact the Director of 
Rdmissions of the Naval Postgraduate School 
for re-evaluation of their Tech Codes. 

Cxomple 

Rn RPC of 221 indicates a total grade aver- 
age for oil college courses in the interval 
2.60-3.19, a complete sequence in calculus- 
of-one-variable with a C+ or B average, and a 
major in physics or pertinent engineering 
area with upper-division courses with a C+ or 
B average. 

Threshold 

Each curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate 
School has a specified threshold RPC for ad- 
mission. R list of these is given at the begin- 
ning of the section on programs. Officers with 



deficient RPC's can qualify for entry into these 
curricula by completing suitable courses from 
the School's Continuing Education Program or 
at any accredited civilian college. Transcripts 
(not grade reports) of work done at civilian 
schools must be forwarded to the Director of 
Rdmissions, Code 0145, Naval Postgraduate 
School, Monterey, CR 93943, to effect an RPC 
change. The grades in all courses completed 
will be used to revise an officer's QPR. Only 
courses with B or better grades are used to 
upgrade either a Math Code or a Tech Code. 

Continuing Education 

It is recommended that all officers desiring 
fully-funded graduate education complete 
recommended preparatory courses prior to 
selection for resident programs. Under the 
guidance of the NRVPGSCOL Office of Con- 
tinuing Education, preparatory refresher and 
credit courses are available on a self-study 
basis. These offerings ore conducted in on in- 
dividualized self-paced mode and include 
contact with a qualified civilian or military tu- 
tor in the local area. Available courses are list- 
ed in the Continuing Education Catalog, which 
is distributed annually to all ships and sta- 



16 



G€N€Rm INFORMATION 



Second Digit 

The second digit represents mathematical 
background according to the following crite- 
rion: 

Code Meaning 

Significant post-calculus math with B 

or better average 

1 Calculus sequence completed with 

6+ or better average 

2 Calculus sequence completed with 

average between C+ and 6 

3 One calculus course with C or better 

4 Two or more pre-calculus courses 

with B or better average 

5 One pre-calculus course with C or 

better grade 

6 No pertinent college-level math 

with C or better grade 



Third Digit 

The third digit represents previous course 
coverage in science and technical fields. 

Code Meaning 

Significant pertinent upper-division 

technical courses with 8+ or bet- 
ter average 

1 Significant pertinent upper-division 

technical courses with average 
between C+ and B 

2 Complete calculus-based physics 

sequence with B+ or better 
average 

3 Complete calculus-based physics 

sequence with average between 
C+ and B 

4 One calculus-based phusics course 

with C or better grade 

5 No pertinent technical courses 



tions. This catalog also contains enrollment 
forms. Personnel may enroll in courses at any 
time, further information may be obtained by 
writing to the Director of Continuing education 
(code 01 1 ) at the NAVPGSCOl, or telephone 
(408) 646-2558/2559/2984 (Autovon: 
878-2558/2559/2984). Preparatory courses 
may be taken at local duty stations either for 
credit or for review only. Successful comple- 
tion of preparatory courses will enhance 
chances of selection to graduate education, 
assist or improve performance in the early 
phases of a graduate program, and reduce 
resident course requirements at NAVPGSCOL. 

Academic Counseling. 

The NAVPGSCOL provides academic coun- 
seling services as indicated below to assist 
officers in developing individual educational 
plans. 

(1 ) Officers who have chosen specific cur- 
ricula, or who have been selected or detailed 
for graduate education in programs at 
NAVPGSCOL, are advised to contact the ap- 
propriate NAVPGSCOL curricular office listed 
in the Programs Section of the catalog. 



(2) Officers not yet selected for graduate 
education and seeking general information 
about subspecialty codes, selection for grad- 
uate education, and preliminary information 
about graduate education commensurate 
with career fields are advised to contact the 
Director of Continuing education (code Oil), 
NAVPGSCOL or telephone (408)646-2558/ 
2559/2984 (Autovon: 878-2558/2559/ 
2984. 



OTH6R U.S. 
MILITARY OFFIC6S 

Officers on duty with other branches of ser- 
vice are eligible to attend the Postgraduate 
School. Requests for admission or transcripts 
from individual officers should not be sent di- 
rectly to the Naval Postgraduate School. They 
should apply in accordance with the direc- 
tives promulgated by the Department of the 
Army, Department of the Air Force, Comman- 
dant U.S. Marine Corps, or the Commandant 
U.S. Coast Guard, as appropriate. 



17 



G6N6RRL INFORMATION 



RIU€D COUNTRV 
MIUTRRV OFF ICCRS 

Military officers from allied countries may 
be admitted to most curricula. Their admission 
is subject to availability of quotas assigned 
to each country. The procedures for applica- 
tion are contained in OPNRV INSTRUCTION 
4950. 1 6. Correspondence must be processed 
through normal channels; requests from indi- 
vidual officers should not be sent directly to 
the Naval Postgraduate School. In addition 
to fluency in Cnglish, candidates must satisfy 
the ocademic standards for each curriculum 
as described in this catalog. 

CIVILIAN €MPlOY€€S 
OF U.S. GOV€RNM€NT 

R civilian employee of an agency of the 
United States Federal Government may be 
admitted for study upon request and spon- 
sorship of the agency. Federal civilian em- 
ployees are not required to pursue the cur- 
ricula designed for officer-students as des- 
cribed in this catalog but instead determine, 
with the guidance of assigned academic 
counselors, the combination of courses that 
will best meet their needs. 

R civilian who is expecting agency sponsor- 
ship should submit a written request for eval- 
uation for admission at least four months 
prior to expected commencement of studies. 
R request should indicate the academic area 
of interest and degree intentions and be 
accompanied by a complete set of official 




transcripts of all previous college work. GR6 
and/or GMRT scores are not required but will 
be considered when included in the sub- 
mission. 

Requests for admission should be directed 
to the Director of Rdmissions, Code 0145, 
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CR 
93943. Questions about available programs 
or admission procedures may be telephoned 
to (408) 646-3093 or Rutovon 878-3093. 

TRANSFER OF CREDITS 

Upon entry to the Naval Postgraduate 
School, each student's academic record will 
be evaluated for possible transfer of credit or 
for exemption from portions of the curricular 
program by validation of course work pre- 
viously completed. Students may also utilize 
knowledge gained through self-study, ex- 
perience or service-related education to seek 
validation or credit for curricular courses by 
taking a departmental examination. 

Twelve hours of graduate-level courses 
previously completed may be accepted for 
transfer credit. These include graduate-level 
courses taken after completion of the bacca- 
laureate degree and those taken in the last 
term before award of the baccalaureate and 
certified to be in excess of degree require- 
ments. 

Questions on transfer credit may be direc- 
ted by letter to the Dean of Rcademic Ad- 
ministration, Code 014, Naval Postgraduate 
School, Monterey, CR 93943, or telephone 
(408) 646-2391 or Rutovon 878-2391. 




Superintendent 
Robert C. Austin, RRDM, USN 



18 



Rcademic Dean 
David fllon Sen rod y, PhD 



G€N€RAl INFORMATION 



SCHOOL STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION 



The Naval Postgraduate School was estab- 
lished and is funded by the Congress of the 
United States. It is administered as an activity 
uuithin the Department of the Navy; conse- 
quently, the institution's governance and ad- 
ministration do not follow norms for civilian 
higher education. There is no exact corres- 
pondence with a board of trustrees or re- 
gents. 

BOARD OF ADVISORS 

The Board of Advisors is composed of dis- 
tinguished professionals, consisting of highly 
qualified civilian educators, prominent citi- 
zens from business, the professions, and oth- 
er vocations, and active and retired military 
officers. The purpose of the Board is to assist 
the Superintendent on strategic matters of 
the Naval Postgraduate Education Programs 
and advise the Secretary of the Navy relative 
to its needs. In fulfilling this objective, the 
Board assesses the effectiveness with which 
the Naval Postgraduate School is accomplish- 
ing its mission and evaluates its future plans. 
Board members are appointed for renewable 
terms of up to four years by the Secretary of 
the Navy upon the recommendation of the 
Superintendent. 

The Board meets annually at the Naval 
Postgraduate School, and after its meeting 
they submit an annual report. Board mem- 
bers also serve on departmental academic 
review committees during the year and assist 
in other matters as requested by the Super- 
intendent or the Secretary of the Navy. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Superintendent of the Postgraduate 
School is a flag officer of the line of the Navy. 
His principal assistant is the Provost/Aca- 
demic Dean who is the senior member of the 
civilian faculty. 

The Superintendent has command respon- 
sibility for accomplishment of the School's 
mission. The Provost/Academic Dean is the 
chief educational officer and is responsible to 
the Superintendent of all academic matters. 
He is appointed by the Secretary of the Navy 
upon the recommendation of a council of NPS 
senior personnel, chaired by the Superinten- 



dent. All other Deans report to the Provost/ 
Academic Dean. 

In addition to serving as the institution's 
president, the Superintendent is the academ- 
ic coordinator for all postgraduate education 
programs in the Navy, and, as such, adminis- 
ters fully-funded graduate educational pro- 
grams, both at the Naval Postgraduate 
School, other service graduate schools, and 
civilian universities. 



ADMINISTRATE STAFF 

Principal assistants to the Superintendent 
and Provost are the administrative staff, 
which consist of two captains of the line who 
serve as the Director of Programs and the Di- 
rector of Military Operations and five faculty 
members who serve as Deans and Directors 
of academic functions. These currently are: 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS: Howard Venezio; 
Captain, U.S. Navy. 

DIRECTOR OF MILITARV OPERATIONS: William 
€. Held, Jr.,Captain, U.S. Navy. 

DEAN OF INFORMATION AND POUCV SCIENCE: 
Kneale Thomas Marshall, Professor of 
Operations Research. 

DEAN OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: John 
Norvell Dyer, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

DEAN OF ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION: Gerald 
Herbert lindsey, Ph.D., Professor of Aero- 
nautics. 

DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH: Gilbert T. Howard, 
Ph.D., Professor of Operations Research. 

DIRECTOR OF CONTINUING EDUCATION: 
Robert D. Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Aero- 
nautics. 



The academic program organization is 
supervised by the Director of Programs, the 
Dean of Information and Policy Sciences, and 
the Dean of Science and Engineering who col- 
laborate to share jointly the responsibilities 
for planning, conducting and administering 
the several education programs. 



19 



G€N€Rfil INFORMATION 



ACAD6MIC DCPAATMCNTS 

Members of t he faculty are organized into 
eleven Academic Departments and three In- 
terdisciplinary Groups, each supervised by a 
Chairman. Over 80% of the teaching staff are 
civilians of varying professional rank and the 
remainder are military officers. The depart- 
ments are grouped into a Division of Informa- 
tion and Policy Sciences and a Division of 
Science and 6ngineering. Designated Deans 
supervise the academic affairs of their re- 
spective divisions. Chairmen of the Interdisci- 
plinary Groups report to the Provost. 

Division of Information & Policy Sciences 

Administrative Sciences 
Computer Science 
Mathematics 
National Security Affairs 
Operations Research 

Division of Science 6t engineering 

Aeronautics 

€lectrical & Computer 6ngineering 

Mechanical 6ngineering 

Meteorology 

Oceanography 

Physics 

Academic Groups 

Antisubmarine UJarfare 

Command, Control & Communications 

electronic UJarfare 

Space Systems Operations 

CURftKUlAR OFFICES 

The Curricular Offices are organizational 
entities that are separate from, but inter- 
active with, the Academic Departments in the 
educational operation of the school. The 
former ore staffed by naval officers and civil- 
ian faculty members whose primary functions 
are threefold: ( 1 ) academic counseling and 
military supervision of officer students; (2) 
curriculum development and management to 
insure attainment of professional and aca- 
demic objectives; and (3) liaison with cur- 
ricular sponsor representatives. 

Students are grouped in accordance with 
their curricular programs and are assigned to 
one of ten Curricular Offices for program su- 
pervision and for academic and professional 



counseling. Students in each curricular group 
pursue similar or closely related curricula. 
€ach Curricular Office is staffed by one or 
more military officers of suitable experience 
and rank and one or more Academic Associ- 
ates. The latter are faculty members selected 
for this part-time assignment. They are re- 
sponsible to the Division Deans for the in- 
tegrity ond academic soundness of the aca- 
demic features of the Curricular Office opera- 
tion. Curricular Officers are responsible that 
the curriculum meets the Navy's needs and for 
the proper administrative operation of their 
respective offices. They report to the Director 
of Programs, who is the senior military officer 
under the Superintendent for all military per- 
sonnel assigned to curricular or academic 
duties. 

Officer students are grouped into the fol- 
lowing curricular program areas: 

Administrative Sciences 
Aeronautical engineering 
Air-Ocean Sciences 
Antisubmarine UJarfare 
Command, Control and 

Communications (C3) 
Computer Technology 
electronics and Communications 
National Security Affairs/ 

Intelligence 
Naval engineering 
Operations Analysis 
UJeapons Cngineering/ASHI 

FACULTY ORGANIZATIONS 

The Faculty has a systematic role in school- 
wide policy-making and planning through var- 
ious established Councils. The Faculty Council 
functions as a primary faculty-input advisory 
vehicle to the Provost and Superintendent. 
The Academic Council, a representative body 
of each academic department and group, has 
cognizance over oil academic standards and 
degree-granting considerations. The Re- 
search Council reviews research proposals for 
and determines allocation of Foundation Re- 
search Program funds, the Computing Advi- 
sory Board and the Library Council functions 
similary recommends campus-wide computer 
operating policy. The composition of each 
Council and its specific functions are des- 
cribed in the NPS Organization and Regula- 
tions Manual. 



20 



G€N€RAL INFORMATION 



STUD6NT COUNCIL 

The Student Council is an organized com- 
munication mechanism between the NPS stu- 
dents and the NPS administration. It functions 
in an advisory capacity in matters involving 
curricula, facilities, procedures and policies 
deemed worthy of attention. The Student 
Council is comprised of thirty-five student rep- 
resentatives, and membership is distributed 
among the curricula by student population, 
with each curriculum having at least one rep- 
resentative. 

The Student Council is headed by a Chair- 
man, Vice Chairman, and Secretary elected by 
members of the Student Council. Officers 
serve for a six-month period. 
Besides a Steering Committee and an elec- 
tion Committee, Student Council Committees 
are formed to correspond with those NPS 
committees or councils which have an impact 



or effect on the student body and which can 
give or receive benefit from such representa- 
tion. Student Council representation is in- 
cluded in the following NPS standing Councils 
and Committees: 

Academic Council 
Faculty Council 
Library Council 
Computer Council 

Cxchange/Bookstore Committee 

Recreation Committee 

O'Club Committee 

Public Works/Housing Committee 

Medical Committee 

Student Council meetings are held at least 
once a month and the minutes of these meet- 
ings are distributed to interested offices with- 
in the School. 



SP6CIRL FACIUT16S 



DUDL6V KNOX UBAMW 



The Library embraces an active collection of 
325,000 books, bound periodicals, govern- 
ment documents, pamphlets, and other mate- 
rials in hard copy and microform; 540,000 re- 
search reports in hard copy and microform; 
and over 1 ,800 periodicals and other serial 
publications currently received. These mater- 
ials parallel the School's curricular fields of 
engineering, physical sciences, managerial 
sciences, operations research, naval sci- 
ences.and national security affairs. 

The Reader Services Division provides the 
open literature sources, such as books, peri- 
odicals and journals, indexes and abstracting 
services, pamphlet materials and newspa- 
pers. It provides access to more than 300 
computer data bases in the curricular fields of 
interest by means of 6RS (Bibilographic Re- 
trieval Services), DIRLOG (Lockheed Informa- 
tion Systems, NCXIS (Mead Data Central), 
and RLIN (Research Libraries Group). It fur- 
nishes facilities for microform reading and 
printing and for reproduction of printed mat- 



ter. It borrows publications not held in its col- 
lections from other libraries. 

The Research Reports and Classified Mate- 
rials Division is the principal repository for re- 
search documents received by the School. It 
houses the Library's classified and unclassi- 
fied research reports in hard copy and micro- 
fiche. R machine information storage and re- 
trieval system that utilizes the School's com- 
puter facilities is available for bibliographic 
searches of research and development doc- 
uments held by the division. Rn SDI (Selective 
Dissemination of Information) Service is also 
available. The Division is able to perform, via 
its own remote terminal, computer searches 
of the data banks of the Defense Technical 
Information Center in Rlexandria, Virginia, and 
thus to provide rapid and efficient access to 
the 1 ,000,000 plus documents held by the 
Center. It also accesses the CIRC (Central In- 
formation Reference and Control) System Qnd 
NRSR/R6CON. 

The Christopher Buckley, Jr., Library is lo- 
cated in the basement of the Library. It is a 
collection of some 8,000 volumes pertaining 
principally to naval history and the sea. 



21 



G€N€RAL INFORMATION 



W.R. CHURCH COMPUTER C€NT€R 

The many services of the Computer Center 
are available to all faculty, staff, and stu- 
dents of the School for use in instruction, re- 
search, or administrative activities. These ser- 
vices are provided on a multiprocessor hard- 
ware configuration consisting of on IBM 3033 
Attached Processor (16 megabytes) loose- 
ly-coupled with on IBM 3033 Model S (8 meg- 
abytes). Both systems hove access to oil aux- 
iliary storage and the input/output devices 
including 4 drums with 1 2 megabytes each as 
paging devices, 44 IBM 3350-1 disk spindles 
(317 Mbytes each), 10 IBM 3420-8 tape 
drives (6250 bpi) and a mass storage system 
containing cartridges of 50 Mbytes each. 

The principal mode of access is via 350 IBM 
3278 Display Terminals located in public 
spaces and private offices in the academic 
buildings and attached by coaxial cable to 
the computer in Ingersoll Hall. In addition, 
there are 20 IBM 3277 API/Graphic displays 
available for public use. The computer net- 
work is run under the operating system VM/ 
SP (Virtual Machine) which provides batch- 
processing support on MVS (Multiple Virtual 
Storage) and interactive computing on CMS 
(Conversational Monitor System). The exten- 
sive programming facilities include VS 
FORTRAN, UURTFIV, VS COBOL, UURTBOL, PL/1 
Optimizer, BASIC, VS APL, and Pascal. Most 
languages are available in both interactive 
and botch-processing modes. 

The School has a heavy commitment to 
computers consistent with their present and 
future role in military operations. All of the 



academic curricula have been affected by the 
presence of computers on campus. All grad- 
uate students take at least one course in 
computer science. They are introduced to 
computers early in their curricula at the Naval 
Postgraduate School and encouraged to use 
them in subsequent course work and research. 

The Computer Center supports a wide vari- 
ety of specialist courses in computer science 
offered by the Departments of Computer Sci- 
ence, electrical & Computer engineering, 
Mathematics, Operations Research and Ad- 
ministrative Sciences. 

The professional staff provides short courses, 
consulting services in application program- 
ming, systems programming and problem 
formulation assistance for students and facul- 
ty members. They participate in an active re- 
search and development program directed 
primarily towards improving the present 
operational environment or introducing new 
hardware and software facilities to users. Cur- 
rent projects include work on systems mea- 
surement, improvement of operating sys- 
tems, graphical data processing, time-sharing 
facilities, micro-to-mainframe communications 
and networking. 

In addition to these facilities, virtually all of 
the academic departments have developed 
computing facilities and/or laboratories, mini- 
and micro-processor based, which provide 
computing support or are dedicated to specif- 
ic areas of research. Micro-computers ore 
widely used as stand-alone development 
tools or as processing elements imbeded in 
more complex systems. Many students have 
purchased their own personal computer. 



22 



G€N€Rm INFORMATION 



SP6CIM. PROGRAMS 



F€D€AAl CIVILIAN EDUCATION 

Any civilian employee of the United States 
government is eligible to participate in the 
program of the School. The individual's em- 
ploying agency is expected to meet the tui- 
tion expense for regular on-campus enroll- 
ment ($1 ,500 per quarter per student). Costs 
associated with participation in the Continu- 
ing education Program are determined on an 
ad hoc basis. 

Programs available to civilian students can 
be classified as follows: 

Regular Curricula: The School's programs 
for officers are designed to meet the require- 
ments of the services for specific education. 
The contents usually exceed the requirements 
for a graduate degree since the service's 
requirements, rather than degree require- 
ments, determine the scope of each program 
Civilian students may enter any curriculum 
at the point at which they are qualified and 
complete the curriculum along with regular 
officer students. The programs section des- 
cribes the available curricula. 

Degree Programs: For civilian students, 
programs can be designed which lead to the 
award of a graduate degree while meeting 
the educational goals of each individual. 
In order to minimize the residency require- 
ment, an off-campus preparatory program 
may be developed in consultation with a 
School advisor. This may include self-study 
courses from the School or courses at a local 
university. If the available time in residence, 
typically four calendar quarters or less, is 
insufficient to complete degree requirements, 
the thesis-project portion of the program may 
be completed off-campus. 

Non-Degree Programs: Civilian employees 
may desire to pursue a program for profes- 
sional advancement without a degree objec- 
tive. Rny of the School's regular courses are 
available for such efforts. For groups of em- 
ployees from an agency, special courses can 
be offered to meet particular requirements, 
provided the demand is in an area of exper- 
tise of the School. 



Continuing €ducation: Approximately thirty- 
five short courses are delivered annually, 
both on-site at supporting activities and at 
Monterey. Rttendance in these courses is 
open to military and civilian employees of 
the Federal Government. Courses given at 
Monterey are offered on a tuition-fee basis. R 
listing of planned short courses is available 
upon request. Civilian employees of the Fed- 
eral Government may also enroll in self-study 
courses which can be completed off-campus 
for academic credit with assistance of an on- 
site tutor. Courses completed in this manner 
prior to beginning a degree program at NPS 
can reduce time in residency. Until further 
notice, no fee is charged for civilian enroll- 
ments in self-study courses. R listing of avail- 
able courses, enrollment procedures, and 
other details of this program are provided in 
the Catalog of Self-Study Credit Courses, 
which is available at all ships and stations in 
the Navy. Copies of this catalog are available 
upon request. 

There are no formal requirements for enroll- 
ment in the Continuing education Program or 
for a non-degree program. For admission to a 
program leading to a graduate degree, the 
minimum qualification is an accredited bacca- 
laureate degree with appropriate prepara- 
tion for the proposed degree program. Rs 
described under Rdmissions Procedures in 
this Catalog, the School will require submis- 
sion of official transcripts covering all college 
work completed to date. 

The point of contact for requests for Naval 
Postgraduate School Catalogs: Dean of Aca- 
demic Rdministration, Code 014, Naval Post- 
graduate School, Monterey, CR 93943; or tel- 
ephone (408) 646-2391 or Rutovon 878- 
2391. Requests for information about on- 
campus programs or admission to degree 
programs: Director of Rdmissions, Code 1 45, 
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CR 
93943; or telephone (408) 646-3093 or 
Rutovon 878-3093. Requests for a listing of 
planned short courses or Catalog of Self- 
Study Courses: Director of Continuing educa- 
tion, Code 500, Naval Postgraduate School, 
Monterey, CR 93943; or telephone (408) 
646-2558 or Rutovon 878-2558. 



23 



G6N6RAI INFORMATION 



CONTINUING €DUCRTION 



The Naval Postgraduate School Continuing 
education Program was established in June 
1 974 as a means of providing extended ed- 
ucational services that will more comprehen- 
sively fulfill the school's assigned mission. 
These extended services include the offerings 
of self-study credit courses off campus; the 
delivery, both on and off campus, of profes- 
sionally relevant short courses,- and ex- 
panded educational counseling. The self- 
study credit course offerings are listed in the 
Catalog of Self- Study Courses which is distrib- 
uted annually to nearly all ships and stations 
in the Navy and to selected offices of other 
DoD establishments. This program is admin- 
istered by the Continuing education Office. 

Selected graduate preparatory courses 
are delivered off campus in a self-study self- 
paced mode for the same academic credit as 
received when taken on campus. These self- 
study courses are delivered to officers at their 
current duty stations for completion during 
off-duty hours. They have been selected from 
courses normally taken in the initial phase of 
curricular programs at the Naval Postgrad- 



uate School. Their successful completion will 
enhance selection for postgraduate educa- 
tion, enhance performance in early phases of 
graduate education programs, and reduce 
course requirements in curricular programs at 
the Naval Postgraduate School. The delivery 
of a self-study credit course normally requires 
the local participation of a qualified tutor 
(e.g., a civilian or officer with requisite grad- 
uate education). Self-study courses taken for 
review do not require a tutor. 

Application for enrollment in a self-study 
course may be made at any time. Applicants 
should use the appropriate form contained in 
the self-study catalog. Self-study courses are 
also available to civilian employees of the 
federal government. 

Commands with available funds may 
arrange for del ivery on site of short courses to 
meet specific needs on a direct reimbursable 
basis to the Naval Postgraduate School. De- 
livery costs may be obtained from the Contin- 
uing education Office. 

More information on short courses and self- 
study courses is available from the Continuing 
education Office, Code 500, Naval Postgrad- 
uate School, Monterey, CA 93943, or tele- 
phone (408) 646-2558 or autovon 878-2558. 




24 







The Curricular Office is an organizational 
entity unique to the Naval Postgraduate 
School. It supports the School's mission and 
objectives by providing the structure for the 
development, maintenance and updating of 
curricular programs which meet both Navy 
and Department of Defense needs and aca- 
demic requirements. The office is composed 
of a Curricular Officer with possible assis- 
tants, one or more Academic Associates, and 
clerical personnel. The Curricular Officer is a 
military officer of suitable rank and experi- 
ence, and the Academic Associate is a faculty 
member who is familiar with the curriculum. 
This team performs the following functions: 

— provides liaison with the curricular 
sponsor 

— develops and manages each curriculum 

— supervises and counsels enrolled 
students 

— provides counseling for future students 

The Curricular Officer/Academic Associate 
team works with the curriculum sponsors to 



develop educational skill requirements and 
update the curriculum courses to ensure that 
graduates are properly educated to face the 
challenges of their future subspecialty utili- 
zation tours. 

Curricular Officers and Academic Associates 
also review the records of all prospective 
students. Following the student's arrival, they 
provide both academic and professional 
counseling as required. This team is responsi- 
ble for ensuring that each individual's aca- 
demic program satisfies education skill re- 
quirements and is consistent with the individ- 
ual's educational background. 

Prospective students are encouraged to 
communicate with the cognizant Curricular 
Officer by letter or telephone for counseling 
regarding particular off-campus courses they 
may require to qualify for enrollment. They 
are also encouraged to take advantage of 
the Postgraduate School's Continuing educa- 
tion program which offers preparatory 
courses required in many of the curricula. 



CURRICUlflR OFFIC€S 



Organizational 

Title Code flUTOVON 

Administrative Science 36 878-2536 

Aeronautical engineering 31 878-2491 

Air-Ocean Science 35 878-2044 

Antisubmarine UUarfare 331 878-21 16 

Computer Technology 37 878-21 74 

electronics and Communications 32 878-2056 

Joint Command, Control, and Communications (C 3 ) 39 878-2772 

National Security and Intelligence 38 878-2228 

Naval engineering 34 878-2033 

Operations Analysis 30 878-2786 

Weapons engineering 33 878-21 1 6 

25 



CURRICUIRR PROGRRMS 



Cach service identifies military billets that require specific graduate level education for success- 
ful performance. More than 6,000 subspecialty coded billets are presently identified in the Navy. 
Quotas for officer inputs to graduate education programs are generated annually to ensure that a 
sufficient number of officers with subspecialty codes will be available to meet current and pro- 
jected billet requirements. Sponsors such as the Naval Sea Systems Command and Naval Air Sys- 
tems Command identify the skill requirements for subspecialty coded billets, and the Naval Post- 
graduate School administers curricular programs to meet the promulgated skill requirements. Cur- 
riculum titles, minimum threshold RPC levels, subspecialty codes and degree titles are listed below 
by ascending curriculum number. 



[urriculum 


Curriculum Title 


Admission 


Subspecialty 


Degree 


Number 




flPC 


Code 




360 


Operations Analysis 


324 


XX42P 


M.S. Operations Aesearch 


361 


Operational Logistics 


324 


XX43P 


M.S. Operations Aesearch 


365 


Joint Command, Control 










6i Communication (C 5 ) 


325 


XDC45P 


M.S. Systems Tech. (C J ) 


366 


Space Systems Operations 


324 


XX76P 


M.S. System Tech. 

(Space Sys. Ops.) 


367 


Computer Systems Management 


335 


XX95P 


M.S. Information Systems 


368 


Computer Science 


325 


XX91P 


M.S. Computer Science 


372 


Meteorology 


323 


XX48D 


Ph.D. Only 


373 


Air-Ocean Science 


323 


XX47P 


M.S. Meteorology Si 
Oceanography 


374 


Operational Oceanography 


323 


XX49P 


M.S. Meteorology Si 
Oceanography 


440 


Oceanography 


323 


XX49D 


Ph.D. Only 


441 


Hydrographic Sciences 


324 


NONC 


M.S. Hydrographic Sciences 


525 


Antisubmarine Warfare Systems 
Technology 


323 


XX44P 


M.S. Systems Technology 
(ASW) 


530 


Weapons Systems engineering 


323 


XX61P 


M.S. engineering Sci. 


531 


Weapons System Science (Physics) 


323 


XX63P 


M.S. Physics 


532 


Nuclear Physics (Weapons Si effects) 


323 


XX67P 


M.S. Physics 


535 


Underwater Acoustics 


323 


XX56P 


M.S. engineering 
Acoustics 


570 


Naval/Mechanical engineering 


323 


XX54P 


M.S. Mechanical Cng. 
or engineer Sci. 


590 


electronic Systems engineering 


323 


XX55P 


M.S. electrical Cng. 


591 


Space Systems engineering 


323 


XX77P 


M.S. electrical eng. 


595 


electronic Warfare Systems Cng. 


325 


XX46P 


M.S. Systems Engineering 


600 


Communications engineering 


323 


XX81P 


M.S. electrical eng. 


610 


Aeronautical engineering 


323 


XX71P 


M.S. Aeronautical Cng. 


611 


Aeronautical engineering-Avionics 


323 


XX72P 


M.S. Aeronautical Cng. 


620 


Telecommunications Systems Mgt. 


335 


XX82P 


M.S. Telecommunications 
Systems Mgt. 


681 


National Security Affairs 
(Middle Cast, Africa, 
South Asia) 


365 


XX21P 


M.A. National Security 
Affairs 


682 


National Security Affairs 
(Far east, South Cast Asia, 
Pacific) 


365 


XX22P 


M.A. National Security 
Affairs 


683 


National Security Affairs 
(6urope, USSA) 


365 


XX24P 


M.A. National Security 
Affairs 


684 


National Security Affairs (International 
Organizations Si Negotiations) 


365 


XX25P 


M.A. Notional Security 
Affairs 


685 


National Security Affairs 
(Western Hemisphere) 


365 


XX23P 


M.A. National Security 
Affairs 


686 


National Security Affairs (Strategic 
Plaming-General ) 


345 


XX26P 


M.A. National Security 
Affairs 


687 


National Security Affairs (Strategic 
Plaming-Nuclear) 


345 


XX27P 


M.A. National Security 
Affairs 


813 


Transportation Logistics 










Management 


345 


1304P 


M.S. Management 


814 


Transportation Management 


345 


XX35P 


M.S. Management 


815 


Acquisition Si Contract Management 


345 


1306P 


M.S. Management 


819 


Systems Inventory Management 


345 


1302P 


M.S. Management 


825 


Intelligence 


334 


XXI 7P 


M.S. National Security 
Affairs 


827 


Material Logistics Support 
Management 


345 


XX32P 


M.S. Management 


837 


Anoncial Management 


345 


XX31P 


M.S. Management 


847 


Manpouuer, Personnel Si Training 










Analysis 


345 

26 


XX33P 


M.S. Management 



CURRICUIRR PROGRRMS 



This section of the catalog includes descriptions of all the curricula offered at the Postgraduate 
School which are summarized in the Table below. Specific academic requirements for enrollment 
are contained in each curriculum segment. 

Students entering any of the technical curricula normally are ordered to a six-week mathematics 
refresher course. It begins in the seventh week of each quarter. This course is not designed to 
teach math, but rather to reacquaint students with calculus. During this refresher, students also 
take an introductory course in set and logic theory and a programming course in BASIC on desk-top 
microcomputers. 

Some officers are ordered to €ngineering Science (Curriculum 460) if they require more prepara- 
tion for entering one of the technical curricula. This program is either one or two quarters long and 
includes calculus, physics, and introductory computer courses. 



CURRICULA SUMMARY 



Normal 

Curriculum Length 

Curriculum Number (Months) 

Administrative Science 

(Material Movement) 813 18 

(Transportation Management) 814 18 

(Acquisition & Contract 

Management) 815 18 

(Allied Officers, DOD Civilians, 

USA, USMC and USCG) 81 7 18 

(Systems Inventory 

Management) 819 18 

(Material Logistics 

Support Management) 827 1 8 

(Financial Management) 837 18 

(Manpower/Personnel Training 

Analysis) 847 18 

Aeronautical Engineering 610 24 

Aeronautical Engineering 

Avionics 61 1 24 

Air-Ocean Science 373 24 

Antisubmarine UUarfare 525 24 

Communications Engineering 600 21-27 

Computer Science 368 21 

Computer Systems 367 1 8 

Electronic UUarfare Systems 

Technology 595 24 

Electronic Systems Engineering 590 21-27 

Engineering Science 460 3-6 

Hydrographic Sciences 441 24 

Intelligence 825 1 8 

Joint Command, Control and 

Communications (C 3 ) 365 1 8 

Meteorology 372 24-36 

27 



Normal 
Convening Dates 


Cognizant 

Currkulor 

Office Code 


July 
July 


36 
36 


January, July 


36 


January, July 


36 


July 


36 


January, July 
January, July 


36 
36 


January, July 
Any Quarter 


36 

31 


Any Quarter 
Any Quarter 
April, October 
Any Quarter 
April, October 
April, October 


31 

35 

331 

32 

37 

37 


October 
Any Quarter 
Any Quarter 
Any Quarter 
January, July 


32 

32 

Any 

35 

38 


October 
Any Quarter 


39 
35 



CURRICUIRR PROGRAMS 



National Security Rffairs 

(Middle 6ast, Rfrica, 

South Rsia) 681 

(Far East, Southeast Rsia, 

Pacific) 682 

(€urope, USSR) 683 

(International Organizations 
and Negotiations) 684 

(UJestern Hemisphere) 685 

(Strategic Planning - General) 686 

(Strategic Planning - Nuclear) 687 

Naval Engineering 570 

Nuclear Physics 

(UUeapons 5i Effects) 532 

Oceanography 440 

Operational Oceanography 374 

Operational Logistics 361 

Operations Analysis 360 

Space Systems Engineering 591 

Space Systems Operations 366 

Telecommunications 

Systems Management 620 

Underuuater Rcoustics 535 

UUeapons Systems Engineering 530 

UUeapons Systems Science 531 



12-24 


January, July 


38 


12-24 


January, July 


38 


12-24 


January. July 


38 


18 


July 


38 


12-24 


January, July 


38 


18 


January, July 


38 


18 


January, July 


38 


24-27 


Rny Quarter 


34 


24-27 


Rpril, October 


33 


24-36 


Rny Quarter 


35 


24 


Rny Quarter 


35 


24 


October 


30 


24 


Rpril, October 


30 


27 


Rny Quarter 


32 


24 


October 


32 


18 


October 


32 


24-27 


Rpril, October 


33 


24-27 


Rpril, October 


33 


24-27 


Rpril, October 


33 




28 



ADMINISTRATE SCI€NC€ PROGflAMS 



RDMINISTRRTIV6 SCI€NC€S PROGRAMS 



Curriculor Officer 



John €. Jackson, CDR, USN. 

Code 36, Ingersoll Hall, Room 219, 

(408) 646-2536, RV 878-2536. 



TRANSPORTATION LOGISTICS 

MflNflG€M€NT 

CURRICULUM 813 

This curriculum is an interdisciplinary pro- 
gram uuhich integrates mathematics, account- 
ing, economics, behavioral science, manage- 
ment theory, operations/systems analysis, 
and a subspecialty concentration into an un- 
derstanding of the process by uuhich the de- 
fense mission is accomplished. These pro- 
grams are designed to provide the officer 
with fundamental interdisciplinary techniques 
of quantitative problem-solving methods, be- 
havioral and management science, economic 
analysis, and financial management; Furthe- 
rmore it is intended to provide the officer with 
a Navy/Defense Systems oriented graduate 
management education and to provide the 
officer with the specific functional skills re- 
quired to effectively manage in this subspe- 
cialty area. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

R baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. F\n RPC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as all 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. €ach student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously 
completed and applicable to the student's 
curriculum so that academic credits may be 
transferred. Validation or credit by examina- 
tion is encouraged where knowledge of the 
material has been acquired by experience or 
service courses. 



TRRNSPORTRTION LOGISTICS 
MRNRG€M€NT 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Material Movement Subspecialist 
with a subspecialty code of 1 304P. The Cur- 
riculum Sponsor is Naval Supply Systems Com- 
mand Headquarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Transportation Systems 

CINClflNTFIT, Norfolk, VR 
Transportation Logistics 

CINCUSNRV6UR, London 
Deputy Chief 

Military Traffic Command 
Director of Material Department 

Naval Supply Depot/Naval Supply 

Center UUorldwide 
Director of Storage Division 

Naval Supply Depot/Naval Supply 

Center UUorldwide 



€ntry Date: Transportation Logistics Man- 
agement is a six quarter course of study with 
a single entry date in July. If further informa- 
tion is needed, contact the Rcademic Associ- 
ate for this curriculum or the Curricular Officer. 

Rcademic Associate: 

Rlan LU. McMasters, Rssoc. Professor, 
Code 54Mg, Ingersoll Hall, Room 209, 
(408) 646-2678, RV 878-2678. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Management are met as 
a milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



29 



RDMINISTRRTIV6 SCI6NC6 PROGRAMS 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MN 21 50 (4-0) 
MN 2031 (4-0) 
MN 333 (4-0) 

MR 2300 (5-0) 



Quarter 2 



Financial Recounting 
€conomic Decision Making 
Managerial 
Communication Skills 
Mathematics For 
Management 



MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Recounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Microeconomic Theory 
MN 3373 (4-0) Transportation 
Management I 
OS 3105 (4-0) Probability & Statistics 



Quarter 3 

MN 3301 (4-0) 

MN3172 (4-0) 
MN3105 (4-0) 



OS 3106(4-0) 



Systems Requisition & 
Project Management 
Public Policy Processes 
Organization & 
Management 
Probability & Statistics 



Quarter 4 

MN 4373 (4-0) Transportation 
Management II 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Rnalysis 

IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 
Systems 

OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 
Management 

Quarter 5 

MN 3377 (4-0) Inventory Management 

MN 41 55 (4-0) Operations Ruditing 

RS 0810 Thesis 

RS 0810 Thesis 



Quarter 6 

MN 4105 (4-0) 
MN 3371 (4-0) 

MN4145 (4-0) 

RS 0810 



Management Policy 

Contracts Management & 

Rdministration 

Financial Management In 

The Rrmed Forces 

Thesis 



TRANSPORTATION MANAG€M€NT 
CURRICULUM 814 

The objectives of this curriculum are to pre- 
pare officers for logistics system positions 
uuithin the Navy, and to emphasize the world- 
wide transportation aspects of it. Graduate 
logistics courses cover topics such as the 
transportation system uuithin CONUS, ware- 
house siting, materials management, pro- 
duction management, inventory manage- 
ment (both Navy and private sector), materi- 
als handling, purchasing and physical distri- 
bution. Students take additional courses in 
transportation in the private sector and mili- 
tary transportation in support of contin- 
gencies, as well as options in corporate finan- 
cial management, production management 
or logistics engineering. 



TRANSPORTATION MANAG€M€NT 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Transportation Management Sub- 
specialist with a subspecialty code of XX35P. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is Military Sea Lift 
Command Headquarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

executive Officer 

Military Sealift Command Office, 
Overseas: Guam, Okinawa, Korea, MCD 

executive Officer 

Military Sealift Command Office, Conus: 
Seattle, New Orleans, San Diego, 
Rnchorage 

Tanker Control Officer 
Military Sealift Command 



30 



ADMINISTRATE SCI6NCC PROGRAMS 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree uuith above aver- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as all 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. €ach student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously com- 
pleted and applicable to the student's cur- 
riculum so that academic credits may be 
transferred. Validation or credit by examina- 
tion is encouraged where knowledge of the 
material has been acquired by experience or 
service courses. 



€ntru Dote: Transportation Management is 
a six quarter course of study with a single en- 
try date in July. If further information is ne- 
eded, contact the Academic Associate for this 
curriculum or the Curricular Officer. 



Academic Associate: 

Alan UU. McMasters, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 54 Mg, Ingersoll Hall, Room 209, 
(408) 646-2678, AV 878-2678. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Management are met as 
a milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 4 



Quarter 



MN 4373 (4-0) Transportation 
Management II 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Analysis 

IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 
Systems 

OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 
Management 

Quarter 5 



MN 


3101 (4-0) Personnel Management 


MN 4942 (4-C) Structure, Conduct & 






Performance Of The 






Defense Industry 


AS 


0810 


Thesis 


AS 


0810 


Thesis 



Quarter 6 

MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
MN 3301 (4-0) Systems Acquisition & 

Project Management 
AS 0810 Thesis 

elective 



MN2150 (4-0) 
MN 2031 (4-0) 
MN 3333 (4-0) 

MA 2300 (5-0) 



Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) 
MN 3140 (4-0) 
MN 3373 (4-0) 

OS 3105(3-1) 



Quarter 3 

MN 3372 (4-0) 
MN3172 (4-0) 
MN 3105 (4-0) 

OS 3106(3-1) 



financial Accounting 
Economic Decision Making 
Managerial 
Communication Skills 
Mathematics For 
Management 



Managerial Accounting 
Microeconomic Theory 
Transportation 
Management I 
Statistical Analysis For 
Management I 



Material Logistics 
Public Policy Processes 
Organization & 
Management 
Statistical Analysis For 
Management II 



31 



ADMINISTRATIVE SCI6NC6 PROGRAMS 



ACQUISITION AND 

CONTRRCT MANAGCMCNT 

CURRICULUM 815 

The Acquisition and Contract Management 
Curriculum is Qn interdisciplinary program 
which integrates mathematics, accounting, 
economics, behavioral science, management 
theory, operations/systems analysis, and 
specific courses in acquisition and contract- 
ing. Inputs Prom the Navy are from the Supply 
Corps and civilians in the 1 1 02 series. Marine 
Corps, Army and Coast Guard officers also 
participate in the program. The curriculum is 
designed to provide officers with the skills to 
serve effectively in hardware system pro- 
curement offices, field procurement offices, 
contract administration offices, and contract- 
ing policy support offices. 

The following are a sample of the educa- 
tional skill requirements of the curriculum as 
delineated by the curriculum sponsor: 
Develop, implement and coordinate pro- 
curement plans, policy and contracts. 
Understand business finance and evaluate 

potential contractor abilities. 
Knowledge of system life cycle, economic 

analysis, contract definition, etc. 
Hove an in-depth comprehension of the 

various types of contracts. 
Ability to evaluate requirements, specifica- 
tions, bids, and proposals. 
Determine rights/obligations for settle- 
ment of controversies on government 
contracts. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree with above over- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as all 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. Coch student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously com- 
pleted and applicable to the student's cur- 
riculum so that academic credits may be 
transferred. Validation or credit by examina- 
tion is encouraged where knowledge of the 
material has been acquired by experience or 
service courses. 



ACQUISITION RND CONTRACT 
MRNRG€M€NT SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Acquisition and Contract Man- 
agement Subspecialist with a subspecialty 
code of 1306P. The Curriculum Sponsor is 
Naval Supply Systems Command Head- 
quarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Contracting Division Officer 

Ships Parts Control Center/Aviation 

Supply Office, Mechanicsburg, PA 
Director of Contracts 

Naval Supply Depots or Naval Supply 

Centers 
Procuring Contracting Officer (PCO) 

Hardware Systems Commands (NAVAIR, 

NAVSeA, SPAUUAR), UUashington, D.C. 
Business/Financial Manager (B/FM) 

Hardware Systems Commands (NAVAIR, 

NAVS6A, SPAUUAR), UUashington, D.C. 
Director of Contracting 

Navy Shipyards 
€xecutive Officer 

Navy Regional Contracting Centers 

(NRCCs) 
Director of Contracts 

Navy Regional Contracting Centers 

(NRCCs) 
Navy Representative 

Commander, Defense Contract 

Administration Plant Representative 

Office (DCASPRO) 



€ntry Dates: Acquisition and Contract Man- 
agement is a six quarter course of study with 
entry dates in January and July. If further in- 
formation is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate for this curriculum or the Curricular 
Officer. 

Academic Associate: 

David V. Lamm, Assist. Professor, 
Code 54lt, Ingersoll Hall, Room 238, 
(408) 646-2775, AV 878-2775. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Management are met as 
a milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



32 



ADMINISTRATE SCI6NC6 PROGRAMS 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 






Quarter I 

MN 2150 (4-0) 
MN2031 (4-0) 
MN 3333 (4-0) 

MA 2300 (5-0) 

MN 2302 (0-3) 

Quarter 2 

MN 3303 (4-0) 

MN 3140 (4-0) 
MN3105 (4-0) 

OS 3105(3-1) 

MN 2302 (0-3) 

Quarter 3 

MN3304 (4-0) 

MN3172 (4-0) 
MN3161 (4-0) 
OS 3106 (3-1) 

MN 2302 (0-3) 



Financial Accounting 
Economic Decision Making 
Managerial 
Communications Skills 
Mathematics For 
Management 
Seminar 



Principles of Acquisition 
And Contracting 
Microeconomic Theory 
Organization And 
Management 
Statistical Analysis For 
Management I 
Seminar 



Contract Pricing And 

Negotiations 

Public Policy Processes 

Managerial Accounting 

Statistical Analysis For 

Management II 

Seminar 



Quarter 4 

MN 3305 (4-0) Contract Administration 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Analysis 

IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 

Systems 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 

Management 
MN 2302 (0-3) Seminar 



Quarter 5 

MN4301 (4-0) 

MN 3377 (4-0) 
MN4151 (4-0) 



MN 2302 (0-3) 
AS 0810 



Quarter 6 



Contracting For Major 

Systems 

Inventory Management 

Internal Control And 

Financial Auditing 

Seminar 

Thesis 



MN 4371 (4-0) Acquisition & 

Contracting Policy 
MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
MN 2302 (0-3) Seminar 
AS 0810 Thesis 

AS 0810 Thesis 



RDMINISTRRTIV€ SCI€NC€S 

(NON USN) 

CURRICULUM 817 

These programs ore designed to provide 
the officer with fundamental interdisciplinary 
techniques of quantitative problem-solving 
methods, behavioral and management sci- 
ence, economic analysis, and financial man- 
agement and to enable the officer to evalu- 
ate the written research, study, and analysis 
product of others throughout his career. The 
curriculum will further provide the officer with 
the specific functional skills required to effec- 
tively manage. 

These curricula are interdisciplinary pro- 
grams which integrate mathematics, account- 
ing, economics, behavioral science, manage- 
ment theory, operations/systems analysis, 
and a subspecialty concentration area into 



an understanding of the process by which the 
defense mission is accomplished. Specialty 
concentration areas are specified by ordering 
officers into a specific curriculum. 

While Allied students are free to choose 
any of the specific management curricula 
available, nearly half choose the more gen- 
eral Administrative Sciences International 
Curriculum 81 7. The 81 7 curriculum allows stu- 
dents to design a program of course work 
that is specifically useful in effectively man- 
aging in the culture uniquely characteristic of 
their own country's military system. The stu- 
dent may elect to specialize in the relevant 
portion of a functional area such as financial, 
logistics, human resources and organization, 
or manpower and personnel analysis. Or, the 
student may choose to follow a general man- 
agement program which would include on 
overall balance of courses from many func- 
tional areas. 



33 



ADMINISTRATE SCI6NCC PROGRAMS 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

R baccalaureate degree uuith above aver- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. An RPC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services as well as al- 
lied officers, and DOD employees, start the 
curriculum with widely varied academic back- 
grounds. 6ach student's prior academic work 
and related military and civilian experience is 
evaluated for courses previously completed 
and applicable to the student's curriculum so 
that academic credits may be transferred. 
Validation or credit by examination is encour- 
aged where knowledge of the material has 
been acquired by experience or service 
courses. 



tion is needed, contact the Academic Associ- 
ate for this curriculum or the Curricular Officer. 

Academic Associates: 

USA - Management Sciences 

George UU. Thomas, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 54Te, Ingersoll Hall, Room 243, 
(408) 646-2741, AV 878-2741. 

USCG & DOD Civilians - Administrative 

Sciences 

USMC - Defense Systems Analysis 
Kenneth J. €uske, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 54€e, Ingersoll Hall, Room 309, 
(408) 646-2860, AV 878-2860. 

Allied Officers - Administrative Sciences 
Roger D. Cvered, Professor, 
Code 54€v, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201, 
(408) 646-2646, AV 878-2646. 



€ntry Dotes: Administrative Sciences for USA, 
USCG, USMC, DOD civilians and allied officers 
is a six quarter course of study with entry 
dotes in January and July. If further informa- 



Dcgrce: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Management are met as 
a milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



TVPICRL COURS€ OF STUDY 

ARMV 



Quarter I 

MN 2150 (4-0) Financial Accounting 

MN 2031 (4-0) economic Decision Making 

MN 3333 (4-0) Managerial 

Communication Skills 
MA 1 1 1 7 (5-2) Single Variable Calculus/ 

Laboratory 

Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Accounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Microeconomic Theory 
OA 2200 (3-2) Computational Methods 

For Operations Research 
OS 3104 (4-0) Statistics For Science And 

engineering 
Quarter 3 

MN 3172 (4-0) Public Policy Processes 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 
Management 
(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 



Quarter 4 

MN 4145 (4-0) 
IS 3183(4-0) 

MN 3105 (4-0) 



Quarter 5 

AS 0810 



Policy Analysis 
Management Information 
Systems 
Organization & 
Management 
(Curriculum Option) 



Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 



Quarter 6 

MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
AS 0810 Thesis 

AS 0810 Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 



34 



ADMINISTRATIVE SCICNCC PROGRAMS 



COAST GUARD 



Quarter I 



MN 2150 (4-0) Financial Accounting 

MN 2031 (4-0) economic Decision Making 

MN 3333 (4-0) Managerial 

Communications Skills 
MA 2300 (5-0) Mathematics For 

Management 



MflRINC CORPS 



Quarter I 



MN 2150 (4-0) Financial Accounting 

MN 2031 (4-0) economic Decision Making 

MN 3333 (4-0) Managerial 

Communications Skills 
MA 2300 (5-0) Mathematics For 

Management 



Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Accounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Micro-Cconomic Theory 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization & 

Management 
OS 3105 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management I 



Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Accounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Microeconomic Theory 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization And 

Management 
OS 3105 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management I 



Quarter 3 

MN 3111 (4-0) Personnel Management 

Processes 
MN 3172 (4-0) Public Policy Processes 
MN4161 (4-0) Financial Management 

Control Systems 
OS 3106 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management II 



Quarter 4 

MN 41 10 (4-2) Multivariate Manpouuer 

Data Analysis 
MN 4145 (4-0) Management Information 

Systems 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 

Management 



Quarter 3 

MN 4154 (4-0) Financial Management In 

The Armed Forces 
MN 3172 (4-0) Personnel Management 
OS 3106 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 
Management II 



Quarter 4 

OA 4702 (4-0) Cost estimation 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Analysis 

IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 

Systems 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 

Management 



Quarter 5 



Quarter 5 








AS 0810 


Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 


AS 0810 
AS 0810 


Thesis 

Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 

(Curriculum Option) 


Quarter 6 




Quarter 6 




MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
AS 0810 Thesis 


MN4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
AS 0810 Thesis 


AS 0810 


Thesis 




(elective) 




(Elective) 




(Curriculum Option) 



35 



RDMINISTRRTIVC SCI6NC6 PROGRAMS 



nLU€D OFFIC6RS 



Quarter 1 

MN 2150 (4-0) financial Recounting 
MN 2031 (4-0) Economic Decision Making 
RS 1501 (0-4) Cnglish Language Skills* 
MR 2300 (5-0) Mathematics For 
Management 

Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Recounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Microeconomic Theory 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization Rnd 

Management 
OS 3105 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management I 

Quarter 3 

MN 3333 (4-0) Managerial 

Communication Skills 

OS 3106 (3-1) Statistical Rnalysis For 
Management II 
(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 



Quarter 4 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Rnalysis 

IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 

Systems 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 
Management 
(Curriculum Option) 



Quarter 5 

RS 0810 

Quarter 6 



Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 
(Curriculum Option) 



MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
RS 0810 Thesis 

RS 0810 Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 

*D6P€NDING UPON INCOMING 6NGLISH 
LRNGURGC SKILLS 




^ 



36 



flDMINISTRflTIV€ SCICNCC PROGRAMS 



SVST€MS INV6NTORV 

MRNRG€M€NT 

CURRICULUM 819 

This curriculum emphasizes the manage- 
ment of Navy owned inventories at all levels. 
81 9 students take additional courses in gen- 
eral inventory model development and the 
specific details of the Navy's inventory mod- 
els, spanning the three levels of wholesale, 
intermediate and retail customer support. 
Officers are responsible for developing pro- 
cedures for establishing, maintaining and 
controlling inventories of material, 'distribut- 
ing that material to the Navy customer, and 
developing the budgets for financing these 
inventories. 

The systems Inventory Management curric- 
ulum is interdisciplinary, integrating math- 
ematics, accounting, economics, manage- 
ment theory, operations analysis, and the 
specialty concentration into an understand- 
ing of the process by which the defense mis- 
sion is accomplished. 



R€OUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

fl baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation, fln flPC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as all 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. 6ach student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously com- 
pleted and applicable to the student's cur- 
riculum so that academic credits may be 
transferred. Validation or credit by examina- 
tion is encouraged where knowledge of the 
material has been acquired by experience 
or service courses. 



SVST6MS INVENTORY 
MRNRG€M€NT 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Systems Inventory Management 
Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 
1 302P. The Curriculum Sponsor is Naval Sup- 
ply Systems Command Headquarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Inventory Control Management 

Naval Supply Depot/Naval Supply 

Center 
Stock Control 

Navy Shipyards 
Head Inventory Control Point 

Polaris Material Office, Bremerton/ 

Charleston 
Director of Program Support Office 

Ship Parts Control Center, Mechanicsburg, 

Pa. 
Director of Customer Support Office 

Ship Parts Control Center, Mechanicsburg, 

Pa. 
Project Officer, Inventory Control Point (ICP) 
Resystemization 

Fleet Material Support Office, 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
Director, Retail Management Division 

Fleet Material Support Office, 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
Project Officer, Inventory Accuracy and 

LOGMflRS 

Fleet Material Support Office, 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
Director, ICP Design and Procedure 
Department 

Fleet Material Support Office, 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

€ntry Date: Systems Inventory Management 
is a six quarter course of study with a single 
entry date in July. If further information is 
needed, contact the Academic Associate for 
this curriculum or the Curricular Officer. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Management are met as 
a milestone en route to satisfying the skill 
requirements of the curricular program. 



37 



Academic Associate: 

Alan UU. McMasters, Associate Professor, 
Code 54Mg, Ingersoll Hall, Room 209, 
(408) 646-2678, AV 878-2678. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SCI6NC6 PROGRAMS 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDV 



Quarter 1 

MN 21 50 (4-0) 
MN 2031 (4-0) 
MN 3333 (4-0) 

MA 2300 (5-0) 



Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) 
MN3140 (4-0) 
MN 3105 (4-0) 

OS 3104(4-0) 



Quarter 3 

OA 3501 (4-0) 
MN 31 72 (4-0) 
MN 3372 (4-0) 
MN 3301 (4-0) 



Financial Accounting 
Economic Decision Making 
Managerial 
Communications Skills 
Mathematics For 
Management 



Managerial Accounting 

Microeconomic Theory 

Organization And 

Management 

Statistics For Science And 

Engineering 



Inventory I 

Public Policy Processes 
Material Logistics 
System Acquisition And 
Project Management 



Quarter 4 

MN 3371 (4-0) Contracts Management 
And Administration 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Analysis 

IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 
Systems 

OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 
Management 

Quarter 5 

OA 4501 (4-0) Seminar In Supply 
Systems 
Thesis 
Thesis 
(Curriculum Option) 

Quarter 6 

MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
MN 41 54 (4-0) Financial Management In 

The Armed Forces 
MN 4310 (4-0) Logistics Engineering 
AS 0810 Thesis 



MRT6RIRL LOGISTICS 

SUPPORT MRNRG€M€NT 

CURRICULUM 827 

The Material Logistics Support Manage- 
ment curriculum emphasizes the production 
and integrated logistics support of uueapon 
systems. Besides study in mathematics, 
accounting, economics, behavioral science, 
management theory and operations anal- 
ysis, the curriculum delves into production 
management, and quality assurance, inte- 
grated logistic support, procurement and 
contract administration as well as project 
management. Skills resulting from the curricu- 
lum will prepare those responsible for man- 
aging the various segments of a military sys- 
tem's life cycle from initial planning for sup- 
port to fielding the system, through sustain- 
ing operations to phase-out. 



MRT6RIRL LOGISTICS SUPPORT 
MRNRG€M€NT SUBSPCCIRUST 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Material Logistics Support Man- 
agement Subspecialist with a subspecialty 
code of XX32P. The Curriculum sponsor is 
Naval Air Systems Command Headquarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance 

Naval Air Stations 
Project Management Staff 

Naval Air Systems Command, 

UUashington, D.C. 
Integrated Logistics Support Coordinator 
for Operational Support 

Naval Air Systems Command, 

UUashington, D.C. 
Director of Receiving 

Naval Supply Depot/Naval Supply Center 



38 



ADMINISTRATIVE SCICNCC PROGRAMS 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

A baccalaureate degree uuith above over- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. 6ach student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously com- 
pleted and applicable to the student's curric- 
ulum so that academic credits may be trans- 
ferred. Validation or credit by examination is 
encouraged where knowledge of the materi- 
al has been acquired by experience or ser- 
vice courses. 



€ntru Dates: Material Logistics Support 
Management is a six quarter course of study 
with entry dates in January and July. If further 
information is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate for this curriculum or the Curricular 
Officer. 



Rcademk Rssociate: 

Alan UU. McMasters, Associate Professor, 
Code 54Mg, Ingersoll Hall, Room 209, 
(408) 646-2678, AV 878-2678. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Management are met as 
a milestone en route to satisfying the skill 
requirements of the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MN 2150 (4-0) Financial Accounting 

MN 2031 (4-0) economic Decision Making 

MN 3333 (4-0) Managerial 

Communication Skills 
AAA 2300 (5-0) Mathematics For 

Management 



Quarter 4 

MN 3371 (4-0) Contracts Management & 

Administration 
MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Analysis 
IS 3183 (4-0) Management Information 

Systems 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 

Management 



Quarter 2 

MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Accounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Micro-Cconomic Theory 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization And 

Management 
OS 3105 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management I 



Quarter 5 

MN 3374 (4-0) 
MN 3377 (4-0) 
AS 0810 
AS 0810 



Production Management 
Inventory Management 
Thesis 
Thesis 



Quarter 3 

MN 3372 (4-0) Material logistics 
MN 31 72 (4-0) Public Policy Processes 
MN 3301 (4-0) Systems Acquisition And 

Project Management 
OS 3106 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management II 



Quarter 6 

MN 41 05 (4-0) 
MN 41 54 (4-0) 

MN4310 (4-0) 
AS 0810 



Management Policy 
Financial Management In 
The Armed Forces 
Logistics engineering 
Thesis 



39 



RDMINISTRRTIVC SCI6NCC PROGRRMS 



FINANCIAL MANAG€M€NT 
CURRICULUM 837 

The objective of the Financial Management 
Curriculum is to prepare officers for business 
and financial positions within the Navy. Fi- 
nancial Managers assist the Navy's decision- 
making processes at all levels by providing 
accurate, timely, and relevant information. 
They are concerned with the optimal alloca- 
tion of human, physical, and financial re- 
sources to achieve the Navy's goals and ob- 
jectives while assuring efficient and effective 
expenditure of public funds. 

Graduate courses cover topics such as fi- 
nancial reporting standards, cost standards, 
cost analysis, budgeting, internal control, fi- 
nancial auditing, operational auditing, man- 
agement planning and control systems, 
quantitative techniques used in planning and 
control, and the Planning Programming and 
Budgeting System used within the Depart- 
ment of Defense. 

Graduates of the Financial Management 
Curriculum will be prepared for assignment to 
positions in budgeting accounting, business 
and financial management, and Internal Con- 
trol and Auditing. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

R baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. Rn RPC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as all 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. €ach student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously com- 
pleted and applicable to the student's cur- 
riculum so that academic credits may be 
transferred. Validation or credit by examina- 
tion is encouraged where knowledge of the 
material has been acquired by experience or 
service courses. 



Naval Medical Command, 
D.C. 



FINANCIAL MRNRG€M€NT 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Financial Management Subspe- 
cialist with a subspecialty code of XX 31 P. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-92, Fiscal Man- 
agement Division. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Comptroller 

Naval Rir Stations 
Budgeting 

Commander, 

UJashington 
Recounting 

Commander, Naval Medical Command 

UJashington, D.C. 
Budget Officer 

Commander, Naval Rir Forces Rtlantic 

Norfolk, VR 
Comptroller 

Naval Supply Depots/Naval Supply 

Centers 
Fiscal Officer 

Naval Supply Depots/Naval Supply 

Centers 
Public Works Officer 

Weapons Stations, CONUS 
Cost Rnalysis 

Office of Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D.C. 
Special Assistants 

Program Planning Office (NRW) 

Fiscal Management Division (OP-92) 



€ntru Dates: Financial Management is a six 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
January and July. If further information is 
needed, contact the Rcademic Rssociate for 
this curriculum or the Curricular Officer. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree Mas- 
ter of Science in Management are met as a 
milestone en route to satsifying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



Rcademic Rssociate: 

Joseph G. San Miguel, Professor, 
Code 54Sm, Ingersoll Hall, Room 318, 
(408) 646-2187, RV 878-2187 



40 



ADMINISTRATIVE SCICNC6 PROGRAMS 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter I 

MN 2150 (4-0) Financial Accounting 

MN 2031 (4-0) €conomic Decision Making 

MN 3333 (4-0) Managerial 

Communications Skills 
MA 2300 (5-0) Mathematics For 

Management 

Quarter 2 

MN 3161 (4-0) Managerial Accounting 
MN 3140 (4-0) Microeconomic Theory 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization And 

Management 
OS 3105 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management I 

Quarter 3 

MN4161 (4-0) Financial Management 

Control Systems 
MN 31 72 (4-0) Public Policy Processes 
MN 3101 (4-0) Personnel Management 
OS 3106 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 
Management II 



Quarter 4 

MN 41 54 (4-0) Financial Management In 
The Armed Forces 

MN 4145 (4-0) Policy Analysis 

IS 3183(4-0) Management Information 
Systems 

OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 



Quarter 5 

MN 3301 (4-0) System Acquisition & 
Project Management 
(Curriculum Option) 

AS 0810 Thesis 

AS 0810 Thesis 



Quarter 6 

MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
(Curriculum Option) 

AS 0810 Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 




ADMINISTRATIVE SCI6NCC PROGRAMS 



MANPOW6A, P€RSONN€L AND 

TRAINING RNRLVSIS 

CURRICULUM 847 

The Manpower, Personal and Training Anal- 
ysis Curriculum builds upon a fundamentals 
program, which is generally preparatory in 
nature and portions of it may be validated. 
The four quarter graduate program which fol- 
lows concentrates on personnel manage- 
ment processes; manpower economics, policy 
analysis, and productivity analysis; and man- 
power and personnel models. Graduates of 
this curriculum will receive a Navy/Defense 
oriented graduate education in management 
with a specialty in MPT. The program is inter- 
disciplinary in the fundamentals portion as 
well as in the graduate specialty portion, 
integrating mathematics, accounting, statis- 
tics, economics, and management theory to 
produce the specific functional skills required 
to effectively manage in the MPT community. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

A baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades is required. Completion of at 
least two semesters of college algebra or 
trigonometry is considered to be the minimum 
mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is 
required for entry. 

Officers from the U.S. Services, as well as all 
others, start the curriculum with widely varied 
academic backgrounds. €ach student's prior 
academic work and related military experi- 
ence is evaluated for courses previously com- 
pleted and applicable to the student's cur- 
riculum so that academic credits may be 
transferred. Validation or credit by examina- 
tion is encouraged where knowledge of the 
material has been acquired by experience or 
service courses. 



MANPOWCR, PCRSONN6L RND 

TRAINING RNRLVSIS 

SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Manpower, Personnel and Train- 
ing Analysis Subspecialist with a subspecial- 
ty code of XX33P. The Curriculum Sponsor is 
OP- 11, Total Force Training and education 
Division. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Head, Ship Manpower Requirements 
Section 

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations 

(Manpower, Personnel & Training) 
Director Total Force Programming/ 
Manpower Division OP- 12, 
UUashington, D.C. 
Programmed Objective Memorandum 
(POM) Operations 
Deputy Chief of Naval Operations 

(Manpower, Personnel & Training 
Director Total Force Programming/ 
Manpower Division, OP- 12, 
UJashington, D.C. 
Manager (OP-12A) 

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations 

(Manpower, Personnel & Training 
Director Total Force Programming/ 
Manpower Division OP- 12, 
UUashington, D.C. 
Total Force Mobilization Plans Branch 
Deputy Chief of Naval Operations 

(Manpower, Personnel & Training 
Director Military Personnel Policy 
Division (OP-1 34G), UJashington, D.C. 
Head, Officer Procurement Plans Section 
(OP-130D) 



€ntru Dates: Manpower, Personnel & Train- 
ing Analysis is a six quarter course of study 
with entry dates in January and July. If further 
information is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate for this curriculum or the Curricular 
Officer. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree Mas- 
ter of Science in Management are met as a 
milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



42 



Academic Associate: 

George UU. Thomas, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 54Te, Ingersoll Hall, Room 243, 
(408) 646-2741, AV 878-2741. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SCI6NC6 PROGRAMS 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDV 



Quarter I 

MN 2031 (4-0) 
MN 3333 (4-0) 

MN 21 50 (4-0) 
MN 2300 (5-0) 

MN2111 (0-2) 
MN 2901 (0-2) 



Quarter 2 



6conomic Decision Making 
Managerial 
Communications Skills 
Financial Accounting 
Mathematics For 
Management 
Seminar In MPTA Issues I 
MPT Computer Skills And 
Applications 



MN 3140 (4-0) Microeconomic Theory 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization And 

Management 
MN3161 (4-0) Managerial Accounting 
OS 3105 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management I 
MN 21 12 (0-2) Seminar In MPTA Issues II 
MN 3902 (0-2) MPT Computer Skills 

Enhancement 



Quarter 3 

MN 3760 (4-0) Manpoiuer Economics 
MN 3111 (4-0) Personnel Management 

Processes 
OS 3006 (4-0) Operations Research For 

Management 



OS 3106 (3-1) Statistical Analysis For 

Management II 
MN 21 1 3 (0-2) Seminar in MPTA Issues 
MN 3903 (0-2) MPT Computer 
Applications 



Quarter 4 

MN4761 (4-0) 
MN 4500 (4-0) 
OS 4701 (4-0) 

MN4110 (4-2) 

MN 21 14 (0-2) 
MN 4904 (0-2) 



Quarter 5 



Manpouuer-€conomics II 
Productivity Analysis 
Manpouuer And Personnel 
Models 

Multivariate Manpouuer 
Data Analysis 
Seminar In MPTA IV 
Advanced MPT Computer 
Applications 



MN 4106 (4-0) Manpouuer/Personnel 
Policy Analysis 

MN 31 72 (4-0) Public Policy Processes 

AS 0810 Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 

Quarter 6 

MN 4105 (4-0) Management Policy 
AS 0810 Thesis 

AS 0810 Thesis 

(Curriculum Option) 




43 



A6RONAUTICAI €NGIN€eRING 



nCRONnUTICRL €NGIN€€RING programs 



Curricular Officer: 



Robert G. Bettinger, CDR, USN, 
Code 31. Holligon Hall, Room 133. 
(408) 646-2491, RV 878-2491. 



R€RONRUTICRl €NGIN€€RING RND 

R€RONRUTICRL €NGIN€€RING 

UJITH RVIONICS 

CURRICULA 610 & 611 

The Reronoutical engineering Programs are 
designed to meet the specific needs of the 
Navy's Operational Technical Managerial 
System (OTMS) for technical managers with a 
broad-based graduate education in Rero- 
noutical engineering. While an undergrad- 
uate degree in engineering is preferred, spe- 
cial preparatory programs can accommodate 
officers with widely varying academic back- 
grounds. 

The Reronautical engineering Programs are 
designed to give the student a broad techni- 
cal and engineering education in the four 
principal areas of aeronautics: gas dynamics, 
flight dynamics, propulsion, and flight struc- 
tures. Additionally, officers receive graduate 
level instruction in aircraft/missile design and 
aero-computer science. Students in the 61 1 
Curriculum receive additional emphasis on 
avionics systems. The programs are divided 
into preparatory, graduate and advanced 
graduate phases. The preparatory phase is 
tailored to each officer's background and is 
programmed for minimum time consistent 
with capability. Rfter the preparatory phase, 
a common graduate core is completed by 
both the 610 and 61 1 students. This phase 
includes advanced studies in propulsion, 
aerodynamic analysis, structural analysis and 
stability and control. During the advanced 
graduate phase, all students receive in- 
depth graduate coverage through advanced 
electives in areas of their choice including 
flight dynamics, gas dynamics, propulsion 
and structures. Students in Curriculum 61 1 
receive advanced studies in guidance and 
control, radar systems and electronic warfare. 



€ntry Dates: Reronautical engineering is an 
eight quarter course of study with entry dates 
in Rpril and October. Those requiring the engi- 
neering Science Curriculum will have their time 
of arrival adjusted to accommodate it. If fur- 
ther information is needed, contact the Aca- 
demic Rssociate or the Curricular Officer for 
this curriculum. 

Academic Associate: 

Richard UU. Bell, Professor, 
Code 678e, Halligan Hall, Room 236, 
(408) 646-2926, RV 878-2926. 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Reronautical engineering 
are met as a milestone en route to satisfying 
the skill requirements of the curricular pro- 
grams. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

R baccalaureate degree, or its equivalent, 
with an above average QPR, preferably in 
engineering or the physical sciences, is re- 
quired. In addition, Mathematics through dif- 
ferential and integral calculus, with above 
average grades and completion of a calculus 
based physics sequence with above average 
grades is also required. Rn RPC of 323 is the 
requirement for direct entry, but the engineer- 
ing Science Program (Curriculum 460) is avail- 
able for candidates who do not meet all the 
admission requirements for direct entry. The 
required RPC for entry via Curriculum 460 is 
334. 

RCRONRUTICRL €NGIN€€RING 
SUBSP€CIRLTV 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Reronautical engineering Sub- 
specialist with o subspecialty code of XX71 P. 
The Curriculum Sponsor and primary consul- 
tant is the Naval Rir Systems Command. 



44 



fleRONRUTICAL CNGINCCRING 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 



Project Officer - Power Plants 

Naval flir Systems Command 
UUeapons Systems Manager 

Naval flir Rework Facility, Pensacola, FL 
Commanding Officer 

Naval Plant Representative Office, 

Stratford, CT 



Attack Aircraft Class Desk 

COMNAVAIRLRNT, Norfolk, VA 
Aeronautical 6ngineer 

Defense Nuclear Agency Headquarters 
Instructor, Aeronautical engineer 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 
Deputy Project Manager for the € - Z 

Naval Air Systems Command 
V P Program Director 

Naval Air Development Center 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MA 2047 (4-0) 
A6 2042(3-2) 
RC 2021 (4-1) 
M€ 2440 (3-0) 
MC 2441 (0-2) 

Quarter 2 

MA 2121 (4-0) 
R€ 2043(3-2) 

R€ 2035(3-2) 
€C 2170(4-2) 

Quarter 3 

MR 3132(4-0) 

R€ 2015(3-2) 
R€ 2036(3-2) 

AC 2801 (3-2) 
Quarter 4 

AC 3451 (3-2) 

AC 3340(3-2) 

CC 2420 (3-0) 
AC 2802(1-3) 



Linear Algebra & Vector 

Analysis 

Fundamentals of Thermo- 

Fluid Dynamics 

Introduction to Flight 

Structures 

Modern Methods of 

engineering Computation 

engineering Computational 

Laboratory 



Differential equations 

Fundamentals of Gas 

Dynamics 

Basic Aerodynamics 

Introduction to electrical 

engineering 



Partial Differential 

equations & Integral 

Transforms 

engineering Dynamics 

Performance & Static 

Stability 

Aero - Laboratories I 



Aircraft & Missile 
Propulsion 
Linear Vibration & 
Dynamic Stability 
Linear Systems 
Aero-Laboratories II 



Quarter 5 

AC 4632 (3-2) Computer Methods in 

Aeronautics 
AC 3501 (3-2) Current Aerodynamic 

Analysis 
AC 3341 (3-2) Control of Aerospace 

Vehicles 
AC 3101 (3-2) Flight Vehicle Structural 

Analysis 

Quarter 6 

AC 4XXX Advanced elective 

AC 3201 (3-2) System Safety 

Management & 

engineering 
MS 3201 (3-2) Materials Science & 

engineering 
AC 0810(0-0) Thesis Research 

Quarter 7 

RC 4XXX Advanced elective 

AC 4XXX Advanced elective 

MS 3202 (3-2) Failure Analysis & 

Prevention 
AC 0810(0-0) Thesis Research 

Quarter 8 

RC 4273 (3-2) Aircraft Design 

or 
AC 4306 (3-2) Helicopter Design 

or 
RC 4704 (3-2) Missile Configuration & 

Design 
RC 4XXX Advanced elective 

AC 0810(0-0) Thesis Research 
RC 0810(0-0) Thesis Research 



45 



ACRONflUTICfil CNGINCCRING 



fl€RONfiUTICfiL €NGIN€€RING 
UJITH AVIONICS SUBSPECIALTY 



Completion of this curriculum qualifies on 
officer os on Aeronautical €ngineering uuith 
Avionics Subspecialist tuith a subspecialty 
code of XX72P. The Curriculum Sponsor is the 
Naval Air Systems Command. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Weapons Officer 

CVN 69 Cisenhower 
VS Program Director 

Naval Air Development Center 
A/C Maintenance/Avionics Office 

Naval Air engineering Center 
Aircraft Systems Project Pilot 

Naval UUeapons Center 



TVPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MA 2047 (4-0) 
A€ 2042(3-2) 
AC 2021 (4-1) 
M€ 2440 (3-0) 
M€ 2441 (0-2) 

Quarter 2 

MA 2121 (4-0) 
AC 2043(3-2) 

AC 2035(3-2) 
CC 2170(4-2) 

Quarter 3 

MA 3132(4-0) 



AC 2015(3-2) 
AC 2036(3-2) 

AC 2801 (3-2) 
Quarter 4 

AC 3451 (3-2) 

AC 3340(3-2) 

CC 2420(3-0) 
MS 3201 (3-2) 



Linear Algebra & Vector 

Analysis 

Fundamentals of Thermo- 

Fluid Dynamics 

Introduction to Flight 

Structures 

Modern Methods of 

engineering Computation 

engineering Computational 

Laboratory 



Differential equations 

Fundamentals of Gas 

Dynamics 

Basic Aerodynamics 

Introduction to electrical 

engineering 



Partial Differential 
equations & Integral 
Transforms 

engineering Dynamics 

Performance & Static 

Stability 

Aero - Laboratories I 



Aircraft & Missile 
Propulsion 
Linear Vibration & 
Dynamic Stability 
Linear Systems 
Materials Science Si 
engineering 



Quarter 5 

AC 4632 (3-2) Computer Methods in 

Aeronautics 
AC 3501 (3-2) Current Aerodynamic 

Analysis 
AC 3341 (3-2) Control of Aerospace 

Vehicles 
AC 3101 (3-2) Flight Vehicle Structural 

Analysis 



Quarter 6 

CC 3670 (4-2) Principles of Radar 

Systems 
AC 4XXX Advanced elective 

AC 4342 (3-2) Advanced Control for 

Aerospace Systems 
AC 0810 (0-0) Thesis Research 



Quarter 7 

CC 4670(4-1) electronic UJarfare 

AC 4XXX Advanced elective 

AC 4XXX Advanced elective 

AC 0810 (0-0) Thesis Research 



Quarter 8 

AC 4XXX Avionics System Design 

AC 3201 (3-2) System Safety 

Management & 

engineering 
AC 0810 (0-0) Thesis Research 
AC 0810 (0-0) Thesis Research 



46 



A€RONflUTICfil CNGINCCRING 



NPS/TPS COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

A program, which combines portions of the 
610 curriculum at the NPS Monterey with the 
complete U.S. Naval Test Pilot School syllabus 
is currently available to selected officers with 
strong undergraduate engineering back- 
grounds. After the completion of four quarters 



of study at NPS, selectees proceed to Patux- 
ent River for the full Test Pilot School Curricu- 
lum. This NPS/TPS Cooperative program re- 
sults in a test pilot designation, XX73G, 
the Aeronuatical engineering subspecialty 
code XX71P and award of the Master's de- 
gree in Aeronautical engineering at the com- 
pletion of test pilot school. 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter I 

MA 2047 (4-0) Lin Algebra & Vector Anal 
MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
MS 3201 (3-2) Mat Sci Si Cng 
MC 2440 (3-0) Modern Meth of 6ngComp 
M6 2441 (0-2) Cng Comp Lab 



Quarter 2 

MA 3132 (4-0) Part Diff €q & Integral 

Transforms 
AC 2043 (3-2) Fund of Gas Dynamics 
A€ 2035 (3-2) Basic Aerodynamics 
MS 3202 (3-2) Failure Analysis Si 

Prevention 



Quarter 3 

A€ 4632 (3-2) 

A6 3101 (3-2) 
AC 3501 (3-2) 
AC 2801 (3-2) 

Quarter 4 

AC 4XXX 

AC 3451 (3-2) 

AC 3251 (4-1) 

AC 4273 (3-2) 

or 
AC 4306 (3-2) 



Computer Methods in 

Aeronautics 

Flight Vehicle Structural 

Analysis 

Current Aerodynamic 

Analysis 

Aero Laboratories I 



Advanced elective 
Aircraft S> Missile 
Propulsion 
Aircraft Combat 
Survivability 
Aircraft Design 

Helicopter Design 




47 



RIR-OCeflN SCI6NC6S 



niR-OC€RN SC!€NC€S PROGRAMS 



Curricular Officer 

Charles K. Roberts, CRPT, USN. 
Code 35, Root Hall, Room 216, 
(408) 646-2044, RV 878-2044. 



MCT€OROLOGY 
CURRICULUM 372 



This curriculum will provide qualified non- 
USN personnel with a sound understanding of 
the science of meteorology and will develop 
the technical expertise to provide, and utilize 
meteorological and oceanographic data in 
support of all aspects of military operations. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

The program is not open to officers of the 
US Navy. 

R baccalaureate degree with completion of 
mathematics through differential and integral 
calculus and a minimum of one year of college 
physics is required. Rn RPC of 323 is required 
for direct entry. The Engineering Science Pro- 



gram (Curriculum 460) is available for candi- 
dates who do not meet all admission require- 
ments for direct entry. 

€ntry Dotes: Meteorology is a seven quarter 
course of study with preferred entry dates in 
Rpril and October. If further information is 
needed, contact the Rcademic Rssociate or 
the Curricular Officer for this curriculum. 

Rcademic Associate- 
Robert L. Haney, Professor, 
Code 63Hy, Root Hall, Room 244, 
(408) 646-2308, RV 878-2308. 

Degree: Master of Science in Meteorology. 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MR 2047 (4-0) Linear Rlgebra & Vector 
Rnalysis 

MR 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
MR/OC 2020 (1-2) Computer computations 
In Rir-Ocean Sciences 

MR 3420 (3-0) Rtmospheric Thermo- 
dynamics 



Quarter 2 

MR 3232 (3-2) Numerical Rnalysis 
MR/OC 3321 (4-0) Rir Ocean Fluid Dynamics 
MR/OC 3522 (4-2) Remote Sensing of the 
Rtmos & Ocean Lab 
MR 3132 (4-0) Partial Diff €q & Integral 
Transforms 



48 



fllR-OC€flN SCICNC6S 



Quarter 3 

MR/OC 4413 (4-0) fiir Sea Interaction 
MR 4322 (4-0) Dynamic Meteorology 
MR 3540 (3-0) Radiative Processes in 
the Atmosphere 
MR/OC 31 40 (3-2) Probability and Statistics 
for flir-Ocean Science 



Quarter 4 



MR 3230 (4-0) Tropospheric & Strato- 
spheric Meteorology 

MR 3235 (0-7) Tropospheric & Strato- 
spheric Meteorology Lab 

MR 3252 (3-4) Tropical Meteorology/ 
Laboratory 

Track Option 



Quarter 5 

MR 4241 (3-0) Mesoscale Meteorology 
MR/OC 4323 (4-2) Num Air & Oc Modeling 
MR 4416 (4-0) Atmos Factors in CM 
& Optical Prop 



Quarter 6 



MR 3262 (3-3) Operational Atmosphere 

Prediction Laboratory 
MR 0810 Thesis Research 

Track Option 



Quarter 7 



MR 0999 (2-0) Seminar in Met 
MR 0810 Thesis Research 

Track Option 
Track Option 



RIR-OCCRN SCI€NC€ 
CURRICULUM 373 

Completion of this curriculum will provide a 
thorough understanding of the air-sea en- 
vironment and will develop the technical ex- 
pertise to provide and utilize meteorological 
and oceanographic data in support of all as- 
pects of military operations. 

This education will further enhance perfor- 
mance in all duties throughout a career, in- 
cluding operational billets, technical manage- 
ment assignments and policy making posi- 
tions. Students will develop graduate level 
technical ability based upon general engine- 
ering and scientific principles, acquire diverse 
professional knowledge and develop analyt- 
ical ability for practical problem solving. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR 6NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree in the physical sci- 
ences, mathematics or engineering is re- 
quired. Completion of mathematics through 
differential and integral calculus, one year of 
college chemistry and calculus-based physics 
are required. An APC of 323 is required for di- 
rect entry. 



RIR-OC€RN SCI€NC€ 
SUBSPCCIRLTV 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Air Ocean Specialist with a sub- 
specialty code of XX47. The Curriculum Spon- 
sor is OP-006, Oceanographer of the Navy. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Commanding Officer 

Oceanographic Unit 
Oceanographer 

CV/BB 
Submarine Group Staff 
Fleet Staff 

Car Gru/Cru Des Gru Staff 
O in C Naval Ocean Command Detachment 
NAVOC6ANCOM Center 
Defense Mapping Agency 
Office of Naval Research 



49 



RIR-OC6AN SCI6NCCS 



€ntru Dotes: Rir-Ocean Science is an eight 
or nine quarter course of study with preferred 
entry dotes in April ond October. If further in- 
formation is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate or Curricular Officer for this cur- 
riculum. 

Academic Associates: 

Robert L. Honey, Professor, 
Code Hy, Root Hall, Room 244, 
(408) 646-2308, RV 878-2308. 



Joseph Von Schwind, Professor, 
Code 68Vs, Hydrographic Sciences 

Building, Room 224, 
(408) 646-3271, RV 878-3271. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Meteorology and 
Oceanography are met en route to satisfying 
the skill requirements of the curricular pro- 
gram. 



TVPICflL COUfiSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1* 

MR 2047 (4-0) Linear Rlgebra & Vector 
Rnalysis 

MR 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
MR/OC2020 (1-2) Fortran Programming 

MR 3420 (3-0) Rtmospheric Thermo- 
dynamics 

OC 3230 (3-0) Oceanic Thermodynamics 

Quarter 2 

MR 3132 (4-0) Partial Differential 

6quations 
MR 3321 (4-0) Rir-Ocean Fluid Dynamics 
MR/OC 3522 (4-2) Remote Sensing of the 

Rtmosphere Si Ocean 
CH 3901 (4-2) Mapping Charting 

& Geodesy 

Quarter 3 

MR/OC 3140 (3-2) Probability S» Statistics 
for Rir-Ocean Sciences 
MR 4322 (4-0) Dynamic Meteorology 
MR 3222 (4-3) Meteorological Rnalysis 
OC 3420 (4-2) Ocean Circulation 
Rnalysis 

Quarter 4 

MR/OC 31 50 (3-2) Rnalysis of Rir-Ocean 
Time Series 
OC4211 (3-0) Dynamic Oceanography 
MR 3230 (4-0) Tropospheric & Strat- 

spheric Rnalysis 
MR 3235 (0-7) Tropospheric and Strat- 
ospheric Rnalysis Lab 

Quarter 5 

MR 3252 (3-4) Tropical Meteorology 
OC4331 (3-0) Synoptic/Mesoscale 
Oceanography 



PH 3406 (4-2) Physics of Sound in the 

Ocean 
Track Option 

Quarter 6 

OC 3570 (2-4) Operational 

Oceanography & 
Meteorology 

OC 4267 (4-3) Ocean Influences in 
Underwater Rcoustics 
MR/OC 441 3 (4-0) Rir-Sea Interaction 

Track Option 

Quarter 7 

GH 3902 (4-2) Hydrographic & Geodetic 

Surveying 
MR 3540 (3-0) Physical Processes in the 

Upper S» Lower 

Rtmosphere 
MR 4323 Numerical Rir & Ocean 

Modeling 
MR/OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

Quarter 8 

OC/MR 321 2 (3-1 ) Polar Oceanography Si 
Meteorology 
MR 4416 (4-0) Rtmospheric Factors in 
electromagnetic & 
Optical Propagation 
Track Option 
MR/OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

Quarter 9 

MR 3262 (3-3) Operational Forecasting 
Track Option 
Track Option 
MR/OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

♦Subject to validation 



50 



rir-oc€Rn sciences 



OPERATIONAL OCEANOGRAPHY 
CURRICULUM 374 



This curriculum will provide students with an 
understanding of the air-sea environment 
and operations analysis principles to forecast 
atmospheric, oceanic and acoustic conditions 
in support of all aspects of Naval operations 
including the flSULI, €UJ and C3 problems. Pri- 
mary emphasis is placed on the understand- 
ing of the impact of the environment (atmo- 
sphere, ocean and their interface) on wea- 
pons systems, sensors and platforms. The 
program recognizes the importance of inter- 
actions between the atmosphere and the 
oceans, and deals with the relationships at 
the air-sea interface. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree in the physical 
sciences, mathematics or engineering is de- 
sirable. Completion of mathematics through 
differential and integral calculus, one year 
of college physics and one year of college 
chemistry are required, fin flPC of 323 is re- 
quired for direct entry. The €ngineering Sci- 
ence Program (Curriculum 460) is available for 
candidates who do not meet all admission 
requirements for direct entry. 

OPERATIONAL OCEANOGRAPHY 

SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Operational Oceanography 
Specialist with a subspecialty code of XX49. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-006, Oceanog- 
rapher of the Navy. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

CV n.S.LU. Module 

Cru Des Gru/Car Gru Staff 

fl.S.ULI. Operations Center 

Navy Laboratories 

Office of Naval Research 

SACLANT fl.S.UU. Research Center 

La Spezia, Italy 
Naval Oceanographic Research and 

Development Agency (NORDA) 
Defense Mapping Agency 

Entry Dotes: Operational Oceanography is 
an eight quarter course of study with entry 
dates in April and October. If further informa- 
tion is needed, contact the Academic Associ- 
ate or Curricular Officer for this curriculum. 

Academic Associate: 

Joseph Von Schwind, Professor, 
Code 68Vs, Hydrographic Sciences 

Building, Room 224, 
(408) 646-3271, AV 878-3271. 

Robert L. Haney, Professor, 
Code Hy, Root Hall, Room 244, 
(408) 646-2308, AV 878-2308. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Meteorology and 
Oceanography are met as a milestone en 
route to satisfying the skill requirements of 
the curricular program. 



TVPICRL COURSE OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra & Vector 

Analysis 
MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
MR/OC 2020 (1-2) Computer Computations 

In Air-Ocean Sciences 
MR 3420 (3-0) Atmospheric 

Thermodynamics 
OC 3230 (3-0) Oceanic Thermodynamics 



Quarter 2 



MA 3132 (4-0) Partial Differential 

equations and Integral 

Transforms 

Air Ocean fluid Dynamics 

Remote Sensing of the 

Atmosphere and Ocean 

Probability and Statistics 

for Air-Ocean Science 



MR/OC 3321 (4-0) 
MR/OC 3522 (4-2) 

MR/OC 3140 



51 



FHR-OC€flN SCI6NC6S 



Quarter 3 

MR 3222 (4-3) 

MR 4322 (4-0) 
OC 3240 (4-2) 

Track Option 

Quarter 4 

MR 3234 (4-0) 



OC4211 (3-0) 

MR/OC3150 (3-2) 

MR 3254 (3-2) 

Quarter 5 

MR/OC4413 (4-0) 
MR 4416 (4-0) 

PH 3406 (4-2) 
Track Option 



Meteorological Analysis/ 

Laboratory 

Dynamic Meteorology 

Ocean Circulation 

Analysis 



Tropospheric and 

Stratospheric 

Meteorology 

Dynamical 

Oceanography 

Analysis of Air Ocean 

Time Series 

Tropical Meteorology/ 

Laboratory 



Air-Sea Interaction 
Atmospheric Factors 
electromagnetic and 
Optical Propagation 
Physics of Sound in the 
Ocean 



Quarter 6 

MR/OC 081 Thesis Research 

MR 3262 (3-3) Operational Atmospheric 

Laboratory 
OS 3601 (4-0) Search, Detection, and 

Localization Models 
OC 4267 (4-3) Ocean Influences and 

Prediction: Underuuater 

Acoustics 



Quarter 7 

MR/OC 0810 
OC/MR 3570 



Track Option 



Thesis Research 
Operational 
Oceanography & 
Meteorology 



Quarter 8 

MR/OC 081 Thesis Research 

MR 3262 (3-3) Operational Atmospheric 

Prediction 
GH3901 (4-2) Mapping Charting 

& Geodesy 



OC€flNOGRAPHY 
CURRICULUM 440 

The Oceanography Curriculum provides 
students with a sound understanding of the 
science of oceanography and develops the 
technical expertise to provide and utilize 
oceanographic and acoustical data in sup- 
port of all aspects of military operations. 
Particular emphasis is placed on the under- 
standing of oceanic effects on the solution of 
the undersea warfare problem. 

This education further enhances perfor- 
mance in operational billets, technical man- 
agement assignments and policy-making po- 
sitions. Students will develop sound grad- 
uate level technical ability based on general 
engineering and scientific principles. 

€ntry Dates: Oceanography is an eight 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
April and October. If further information is 
needed, contract the Academic Associate or 
Curricular Officer for this curriculum. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

The program is not open to officers of the 
U.S. Navy. 

A baccalaureate degree in the physical sci- 
ences, mathematics or engineering is re- 
quired. Completion of mathematics through 
differential and integral calculus, one year of 
college physics and one year of college 
chemistry are required. An APC of 323 is re- 
quired for direct entry. The engineering Sci- 
ence Program (Curriculum 460) is available for 
candidates who do not meet all admission re- 
quirements for direct entry. 

Academic Associate: 

Joseph J. Von Schwind, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 68Vs, Root Hall, Room 216, 
(408) 646-3271, AV 878-3271. 

Degree: Master of Science in Oceanography. 



52 



AIR-OCeAN SCI€NC€S 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 

Quarter 1 

MR 2047 (4-0) lenear Algebra & Vector 
Analysis 

MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 

OC 2020 (1-2) Computer Computations 
in Air-Ocean Sciences 

MR 3420 (3-0) Atmospheric Thermo- 
dynamics 

OC 3230 (3-0) Ocean Thermodynamics 

Quarter 2 

MA 3132 (4-0) Partial Differential 

equations 5» Integral 
Transforms 
MR/OC3321 (4-0) Rir-Ocean fluid Dynamics 
MR/OC 3522 (4-2) Remote Sensing of the 
Rtmosphere & OCean 
MA 3232 (3-2) Numerical Analysis 

Quarter 3 

MR 3222 (4-3) Meteorological Rnalysis/ 

Laboratory 
PH 3406 (4-2) Physics of Sound in the 

Ocean 
OC 3240 (4-2) Ocean Circulation 

Rnalysis 
MR/OC 3 1 40 Probability and Statistics 

for Air-Ocean Science 



Quarter 6 



Quarter 4 

OC4211 (3-0) 
OC3150 (3-2) 
OC 4267 (4-3) 

OC3212 (3-1) 

Quarter 5 

OC4413 (4-0) 
MR 4322 (4-0) 
OC4213 (3-1) 

OC 3445 (2-2) 



Dynamical 

Oceanography 

Rnalysis of Rir-Ocean 

Time Series 

Ocean Influences & 

Prediction: Underuuater 

Rcoustics 

Polar Meteorology/ 

Oceanography 



Rir-Sea Interaction 

Dyanic Meteorology 

Nearshore & Wave 

Processes 

Oceanic Si Rtmosphere 

Observational Systems 



OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

OC4331 (3-0) Synoptic/Mesoscale 

Oceanography 
OC4414 (3-0) Rdvanced Rir-Sea 

Interaction 
OC4212 (4-0) Tides 



Quarter 7 



OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

OC 4323 (4-2) Numerical Rir & Ocean 

Modeling 
OC 4220 (3-0) Shollouu Water 

Oceanography 
elective 



Quarter 8 

OC 0810/OC 0999 Thesis Research 
Presentation 
OC 361 (2-2) Wave & Surf Forecasting 
elective 
elective 



HYDROGRAPHIC SCI€NC€S 
CURRICULUM 441 

This curriculum of study provides students 
with a sound understanding of oceanography 
and hydrography. Hydrography (a subdisci- 
pline of Mapping, Charting and Geodesy 
(MC&G)) is the science of the measurement, 
description and charting of the sea floor with 
special reference to navigation and marine 
operations. This interdisciplinary program in- 
tegrates the scientific principles of ocean- 
ography with the practical engineering pro- 
cedures of hydrography. Students achieve 
the technical expertise to provide and utilize 
hydrographic data in support of all aspects of 
hydrographic operations. 

€ntru Dates: Hydrographic Sciences is on 
eight quarter course of study with preferred 
entry in October. If further information is 
needed, contact the Rcademic Rssociate for 
this curriculum. 



53 



AlA-OCeAN SCI6NC6S 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 



Quarter 3 



This program is open to officers of the Na- 
tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra- 
tion, Coast Guard, Corps of engineers, allied 
officers and civilian employees of the U.S. fed- 
eral government. There is no Navy Subspe- 
cialty in Hydrographic Sciences. 

A baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades in mathematics and the physical 
sciences. Differential and integral calculus 
one year of college physics and one year of 
college chemistry are required. An APC of 324 
is required for direct entry into the program. 
The engineering Science Program (Curriculum 
460) is available for candidates who do not 
meet all admission requirements for direct 
entry. 

Academic Associate: 

Joseph J. Von Schwind, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 68Vs, Root Hall, Room 216, 
(408) 646-3271, AV 878-3271. 

Degree: Master of Science in Hydrographic 
Sciences. 



OC3120 (4-3) Biochemical Processes in 

the Ocean 
OS 3104 (4-0) Statistics for Science & 

Engineering 
OC 4213 (3-1 ) Nearshore & Wave 

Processes 
GH3902 (4-2) Hydrographic & 

Geodetic Surveying 



Quarter 4 



CS 3010 (4-0) Computing Devices & 

Systems 
OC 3260 (3-0) Sound in the Ocean 
GH3903 (4-0) electrical Surveying & 

Navigation 
GH3906 (2-2) Hydrographic Survey 

Planning 
GH4908 (3-2) Photogrammetry & 

Remote Sensing 



Quarter 5 



GH3910 (2-1) Hydrographic Survey 
Field experience 

GH3911 (1-5) Geodetic Survey Aeld 
experience 

GH 4906 (4-0) Geometric & Astronomic 
Geodesy 



TVPICRL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 



Quarter 6 



OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

OC 3325 (3-0) Marine Geophysics 

GH3912 (2-2) Advanced Hydrography 
Track Option 



MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra & Vector 

Analysis 
OC 3230 (3-0) Ocean Thermodynamics 
CS 2450(3-1) Computer Programming 

with Fortran 



Quarter 7 



OC 08 1 Thesis Research 

OC4212 (4-0) Tides 

GH4907 (4-0) Gravimetric & Satellite 

Geodesy 
Track Option 



Quarter 2 



Quarter 8 



MA 3132 (4-0) Partial Differential 

equations & Integral 
Transform 
MR 2220 (4-1) Marine Meteorology 
OC 31 30 (4-2) Mechanics of Fluids 
GH3901 (4-2) Mapping, Charting & 
Geodesy 



OC 08 10/0999 Thesis Research/ 

Presentation 
NS 3962 (4-0) Ocean, Maritime Si Tort 

Law for the Hydrographic 

Community 
Track Option 
Track Option 



54 



RNTISUSMRRIN6 Wflflfflfi€ PROGRRM 



RNTISUBMRRIN€ WRRFRR€ PROGRRM 



Curriculor Officer 

John H. Long, CDR, USN, 

Code 331, Spanogel Hall, Room 328, 

(408) 646-21 16/7, RV 878-21 16/7. 



ANTISUBMARINE WRRFRR€ 
CURRICULUM 525 

The flSUJ Curriculum educates officers in the 
engineering fundamentals, physical princi- 
ples and analytical concepts that govern 
operational employment of RSUU sensors and 
uueapon systems, and includes extensive 
breadth in the appropriate scientific and tech- 
nical disciplines. This interdisciplinary pro- 
gram integrates mathematics, physics, 
acoustics, electrical engineering, oceanog- 
raphy, operations analysis, human factors, 
computer science and meteorology. The aca- 
demic content divides naturally into four 
major areas: Electrical engineering with 
emphasis on signal processing, Underwater 
Rcoustics with emphasis on signal propaga- 
tion and detection, Operations Analysis with 
emphasis on tactical application and decision 
analysis, and Rir-Ocean Sciences with 
emphasis on the environmental factors 
affecting sound in the sea. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

R baccalaureate degree, or equivalent, from 
a program with a calculus sequence and a cal- 
culus-based physics sequence that results in 
an RPC of 323 is required for direct input. 
Courses in the physical sciences and engi- 
neering are desirable. Rn additional qualifi- 
cation for entry is that a selectee must have 
demonstrated strong professional perfor- 
mance in at least one RSUU mission unit. Offi- 
cers not meeting the academic requirements 
for direct input enter the program via one or 
two quarters of engineering Science (Curricu- 
lum 460). 



RNTISUBMRRIN€ WARFAR6 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Antisubmarine UUarfare Systems 
Technology Specialist with a subspecialty 
code of XX44. The Curriculum Sponsor is 
OP-951, RntiSubmarine UUarfare Division. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Naval Ocean Systems Center 
Naval Underwater Systems Center 
Naval Surface UUarfare Development 

Group 
Destroyer Squadron Staffs 
Operational Test and evaluation Force 
Submarine Development Squadron Twelve 
Patrol UUing Staffs 
Naval Rir Systems Command 
Rir Test and evaluation Squadron One 
OPNRV 

Entry Dates: The RSUU curriculum is an eight 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
Rpril and October. If further information is 
needed, contact the Rcademic Rssociate or 
Curricular Officer for this curriculum. 

Rcademic Rssociate: 

James V. Sanders, Rssociate Professor, 
Code 33R, Spanagel Hall, Room 328, 
(408) 646-21 16, RV 878-21 16. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in System Technology 
(Rntisubmarine UUarfare) are met as a mile- 
stone en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



55 



RNTISUBMRRINC UURRFfiRC PROGRRM 



TVPICftl COURS€ Of STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MR 1112 (2-2) 

MR 2129 (2-1) 



MR 2181 (2-1) 
OC 2120 (4-0) 
OS 2210(4-1) 



Quarter 2 

CO 2720 (4-2) 

OS 2103 (4-1) 

PH 2119 (4-1) 
MR 3139 (4-0) 



Quarter 3 

PH 2401 (3-0) 

€0 3720(4-1) 

OS 3303(4-1) 
OS 3604 (4-0) 

Quarter 4 

€0 4720 (4-1) 

OC 4267 (4-3) 



PH 3402 (4-2) 



Selected Calculus Topics 

Review 

Ordinary Differential 

equations and Laplace 

Transforms 

Vector Calculus 

Survey of Oceanography 

Introduction to Computer 

Programming 



Introduction to electronic 
Systems 

Rpplied Probability for 
Systems Technology 
Oscillation and Waves 
Fourier Rnalysis and 
Partial Differential 
equations 



Introduction to the Sonar 

equations 

Introduction to Signals & 

Noise 

Computer Simulation 

Decision & Data Rnalysis 



Signal Processing 

Systems 

Ocean Influences & 

Predictions: Underwater 

Rcoustics 

Underwater Rcoustics 



Quarter 5 

(first six weeks) 

MR 2413 (3-1 ) Meteorology for 

Rntisubmarine Warfare 
PH 3306 (4-0) electromagnetic Wave 

Propagation 
(last six weeks) 

expcRieNce tour off crmpus 



Quarter 6 

eC 4450(4-1) 
OS 3402 (3-1) 
PH 4403 (4-1) 
PH 3002 (4-0) 

Quarter 7 

OS 3602 (4-1 ) 

OS 4601 (4-0) 
ST 0810 

Quarter 8 



Sonar Systems 
engineering 
Human Vigilance 
Performance 
Rdvanced Topics in 
Underwater Rcoustics 
Non-Rcoustic Sensor 
Systems 



Introduction to Combat 
Models & Weapons 
effectiveness 
Test & evaluation 
elective Option 
Thesis 



NS 3152 (4-0) Naval Warfare & 

Threat environment 
ST 9999 elective Option 

ST 0810 Thesis 



56 



COMPUT€R TECHNOLOGY 



COMPUT€R T6CHNOLOGV PROGRAMS 



Curriculor Officer 

David D. Blankenship, LCDR, USN 

Code 37, Spanagel Hall, Room 401 

(408) 646-21 74/21 75, FIV 878-21 74/21 75. 



COMPUT6R SVST€MSMRNRG€M€NT 
CURRICULUM 367 

This is on interdisciplinary graduate level 
master's program integrating mathematics, 
accounting, economics, statistics, computer 
science, information systems, behavioral sci- 
ence, and management disciplines. 

This program prepares the officer for the 
planning, procurement, and management 
decision-making skills necessary to evaluate 
changing technology, to translate operation- 
al requirements and economic trade offs into 
system specifications, and to implement and 
properly utilize complex tactical and non-tac- 
tical military computer centers, networks, and 
systems. This curriculum is designed to meet 
the Navy's need for a technically qualified of- 
ficer with managerial skills essential to the 
successful implementation and effective utili- 
zation of computer systems in military set- 
tings. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

R baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, 
with above average grades in mathematics, 
(including differential and integral calculus) 
resulting in an RPC of at least 335 is required 
for direct entry. Students lacking these quan- 
titative prerequisites may be acceptable for 
the program providing their undergraduate 
records and/or other indicators of success, 
such as GR€ (Graduate Record examination), 
GMRT (Graduate Management Rdmission 
Test) formerly RTGSB (Rdmission Test for 
Graduate Schools of Business), indicate a 
capability for graduate level work. While pre- 
vious computer or automatic data processing 
(RDP) experience is certainly helpful, it is not 
essential. 



COMPUTCR SVST€MSMRNRG€M€NT 
SUBSKCMITY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Computer Systems Management 
Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 
XX95. The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-945, 
Director, Information Systems Division. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Weapons Control Project Subsurface 
Service engineer, 

Naval Underwater Systems Center, 

Newport, R.I. 
Operation Test evaluation, 

NRVaOC PD6- 1 06 NRVSPRC6 PROGRRM, 

Washington, D.C. 
Rir Systems, 

NRVOC6RNSVSC6N, San Diego, Co. 
Computer Systems, 

NSR/CSS, Ft. Meade, Md. 
Data Base Management 

Naval War College, Newport R.I. 
Computer Systems Rnalyst/Development, 

COMNRVM6DCOM, Washington, D.C. 
Computer Systems Rnalyst 

COMNRVDRC, Washington, D.C. 

€ntry Dates: Computer Systems Manage- 
ment is a six quarter course of study with 
entry dates in Rpril and October. On a cose 
by case basis, students may commence their 
programs in January and July through prior 
preparation. If further information is needed, 
contact the Rcademic Rssociate for this cur- 
riculum. 
Rcademic Rssociate: 

Daniel R. Dolk, Assistant Professor, 
Code 54Dk, Ingersoll Hall, Room 316. 
(408) 646-2260, RV 878-2260. 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Information Systems are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of the curricular program. 



57 



COMPUTER T6CHNOLOGV 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

CS 2970 (5-0) 
IS 2000 (3-0) 
MN2155 (4-0) 
MN 3105 (4-0) 

Quarter 2 



Struc Prog with PASCAL 
Intro to Comp Mgmt 
Accounting for Mgmt 
Organization and Mgmt 



CS 3010 (4-0) Comp Devices & Sys 

CS 3020 (4-0) Software Design 

IS 31 70 (4-0) Ccon €val of Info Sus I 

IS 2100 (0-2) Info Systems Lab 

OS 3101 (5 : 0) Stat Anal for Mgmt 

Quarter 3 

CS 3030 (4-0) Op Sus Structures 

IS 4200 (4-0) Sus Anal & Design 

IS 41 83 (4-0) Applic of Database Mgmt 

Sys 

OS 3004 (5-0) Ops Research for CSM 



Quarter 4 

IS 3502 (4-0) Computer Network: Wide 
Area/Local Area 

IS 4185 (4-0) Decision Support Sus 

IS 0810 Thesis 

(Option elective) 

Quarter 5 

IS 4300 (4-0) Software €ng & Mgmt 
MN 3307 (4-0) ADP Acquisition 
IS 0810 Thesis 

(Option elective) 



Quarter 6 

MN 4154 (4-0) Financial Mgmt in the 
Armed Forces 

IS 4182 (4-0) Info Systems Mgmt 

IS 0810 Thesis 

(Option elective) 



COMPUT6R SCI€NC€ 
CURRICULUM 368 



This program is on interdisciplinary techni- 
cal graduate level master's program integrat- 
ing mathematics, statistics, computer science, 
electrical engineering, information systems, 
and operations research. The Computer Sci- 
ence curriculum is designed to provide an 
officer with the technical knowledge and skills 
necessary to specify, evaluate, and manage 
computer system design,- to provide techni- 
cal guidance in applications ranging from 
data processing to tactical embedded sys- 
tems; to educate officers in the analysis and 
design methodologies appropriate for hard- 
ware, software, and firmware; and to provide 
the officer with practical experience in apply- 
ing modern computer laboratory equipment 
and research techniques to military problems. 



COMPUTCR SCI€NC€ 

SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Computer Science Subspecialist 
with a subspecialty code of XX91. The Cur- 
riculum Sponsor is OP-945, Director, Informa- 
tion Systems Division. 
Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 
Navigation Systems Integration Projects 
Office, 

STRATSVSPROG, Wash., D.C. 
Assistant Information Management/ 
TRIMIS ADDU FM 

COMNAVM6DCOM, Washington, D.C. 
ADP Programs/WWMCCS Project, 

DPSCPAC, Pearl Harbor, Hi. 
ADP Plans Director, 

FL6MATSUPPO, Mechanicsburg, Pa 
ADP Plans-Customer Liaison, 

NARDAC, Pensacola, R. 
ASST CIC - NTDS. 

USS CARL VINSON (CVN-70) 



58 



COMPUTER T€CHNOLOGV 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, 
with above average grades in mathematics, 
(including differential and integral calculus) 
resulting in an flPC of at least 325, is required 
for direct entry. Undergraduate majors in 
applied science or engineering are highly 
desirable. Students lacking these prerequi- 
sites may be acceptable for the program pro- 
viding their undergraduate records and/or 
other indicators of success, such as GR6 
(Graduate Record examination), indicate a 
capability to work in quantitative subjects. 
While previous academic or practical experi- 
ence in computer science is certainly helpful 
and can enhance an applicant's potential for 
admission, such experience is not a prerequi- 
site. 



€ntry Dotes: Computer Science is a seven 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
Rpril and October. On a case by case basis, 
students may commence their program in Jan- 
uary and July through prior preparation. If 
further information is needed, contact the 
Rcademic Rssociate for this curriculum. 

Academic Rssociate: 

Uno R. Kodres, Professor, 

Code 52Kr, Spanagel Hall, Room 534R 

(408) 646-2197, RV 878-2197. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Computer Science are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of the curricular program. 



TVPICRL COURS€ OF STUDV 



Quarter 1 

CS 2970 (5-0) Structured Programming 

with PRSCRL 
CS 2000 (3-1 ) Introduction to the 

Science of Computing 
€€ 2810(3-2) Digital Machines 
MR 2025 (4-1 ) Logic, Sets and Functions 

Quarter 2 

CS 3200 (3-2) Introduction to Computer 

Organization 
CS 3111 (4-0) Principles of Programming 

Languages 
CS 3300 (3-1 ) Data Structures 
MR 3026 (5-0) Discrete Math & Rutomata 

Theory 



Quarter 3 

CS 3601 (4-0) Rutomata, Formal 
Languages, and 
Computability 

CS 3400 (4-0) Comparative Computer 
Rrchitecture 

CS 3460 (3-2) Software Methodology 

CS 3450(3-1) Software System Design 



Quarter 4 

CS 3310 (4-0) Artificial Intelligence 

OS 3001 (4-0) Ops Rearch for Computer 

Scientists 
CS 4450 (4-0) Rdvanced Computer Rrch 
CS 4113 (4-0) Rdvanced Lang. Topics 
CS 4300 (4-0) Data Base Sys 



Quarter 5 




CS 3502 (4-0) Computer 




Communications and 




Networks 


CS 4310 (4-0) Rdvanced Artificial 




Intelligence 


CS 4500 (4-1) 


Software engineering 


CS 0810 


Thesis 


Quarter 6 




IS 4200 (4-0) Systems Analysis & 




Design 




Option elective 




Option elective 


CS 0810 


Thesis 


Quarter 7 






Option elective 




Option elective 


CS 0810 


Thesis 


CS0810 


Thesis 



59 



JOINT COMMAND, CONTROL. AND COMMUNICATIONS 



JOINT COMMAND. CONTROL, RND COMMUTATIONS 
(Joint C3) PROGRAMS 



Curriculor Officer 

Undo K. Crumbock, MFUOR, USRF, 
Code 39, Spanagel Holl, Room 203, 
(408) 646-2772, RV 878-2772. 



JOINT COMMAND, CONTROL, RND 

COMMUNICATIONS 

CURRICULUM 365 



The Joint C3 curriculum is designed to pro- 
vide officers and their civilian DOD equiva- 
lents with a comprehensive operational and 
technical understanding in the field of com- 
mand, control and communications systems. R 
primary goal is to enable the student to oper- 
ate with enhanced capabilities in such di- 
verse fields as military decision making, cur- 
rent and future C3 systems design, and joint 
military operations. The curriculum is tailored 
to the requirements of selected officers who 
hove outstanding performance records and 
anticipate continued careers focused on the 
conduct of military operations. 

The Joint C3 curriculum is designed to meet 
brood educational objectives endorsed by 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The overall objective 
is to provide officers and DoD civilian equiva- 
lents, through graduate education, with a 
comprehensive operational and technical un- 
derstanding in the field of Command, Control 
and Communications systems as applied to 
Joint and combined military operations at the 
national and unified command levels. To de- 
velop individuals who have an understanding 
of the role C3 systems play in the use of mil- 
itary power, and the ability to interpret the 
inpoct of C3 on operating philosophy; pos- 
sess an adequate background knowledge in 
the basic technology, human capabilities and 
joint military operations and how these are 
exploited in current C3 systems; can perform 
requirement and planning studies of new 
C3 systems; and contribute to crisis manage- 
ment. These officers should be able to under- 
take a wide range of assignments in C3 (both 
joint and intra-service) over the full span of a 
career. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

The Joint C3 curriculum is open to all U.S. 
Miliary Services and selected civilian employ- 
ees of the U.S. Federal Government. Admis- 
sion requires a baccalaureate degree with 
above average grades, and mathematics 
through differential and integral calculus. R 
Top Secret security clearance is required with 
Special Intelligence (SI) clearance obtain- 
able, f^n RPC of 325 is required for direct en- 
try. Officers not meeting the academic re- 
quirements for direct input may enter the pro- 
gram via one or two quarters of engineering 
Science (Curriculum 460). 

JOINT COMMRND, CONTROL 

& COMMUNICATIONS 

SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Joint Command, Control, and Com- 
munications Subspecialist with a subspecial- 
ty code of XX45. The Curriculum Sponsor is 
OP-956, electronic Warfare. 
Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Staff Command and Control Officer 
Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet 
Surface Systems Officer 

Naval Ocean Systems Center 
RDP Plans Officer 

World Wide Military Command Si Control 
System Joint Program Office 
Staff Operations Plans Officer 

Headquarters, Curopean Command 
Staff Operations and Plans Officer 

Commander 7th Fleet 
Programs Manager 

Naval Space and Warfare Systems 
Command 
€ntry Dates: Joint Command, Control and 
Communications is a six quarter course of 
study with a single entry date in October. If 
further information is needed, contact the 
Rcademic Rssociate or the Curricular Officer 
for this curriculum. 



60 



JOINT COMMAND, CONTROL, AND COMMUNICATIONS 



Academic Associate: 

Carl R. Jones, Professor, 

Code 54Js, Ingersoll Hall, Room 248, 

(408) 646-2767, flV 878-2767. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Systems Technology 
(Command, Control and Communications) ore 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter I 

Mfl 2050 (4-1 ) App Math for Cng & Op 

Anal (Plus Lab) 
CS 2970 (5-0) Struc Prog with PASCAL 
OS 3404 (3-0) Man-Machine Interaction 
OS 21 03 (4-1 ) App Prob for Sys Tech 

Quarter 2 

€0 2710 (4-2) Intro to Signals & Systems 
CS 3020 (3-2) Software Design 
CM 3111 (4-0) C3 Missions & 

Organization Theory 
OS 3604 (4-0) Decision & Data Analysis 

Quarter 3 

CO 2750 (4-2) Communication Systems 
CS 4320 (4-0) D Base Sys Design 
OS 3008 (4-0) Analytical Planning 
Methodology 
Cmphasis Sequence 
elective 



Quarter 4 

MR 2419 (2-0) 
OS 3636 (4-0) 

OS 3603 (3-1) 



Quarter 5 



Atmosphere Factors in C3 
Architecture of C3 
Information Systems 
Simulation & UUargaming 
Cmphasis Sequence 
elective 



CI 3750(3-1) Communication System 

Analysis 
OS 4602 (3-3) C3 Systems evaluation 
CC 0810 Thesis Research 

Cmphasis Sequence 

elective 

Quarter 6 

CC 41 13 (4-0) C3 Policies and Problems 
MN 3301 (4-0) Systems Acquisition and 

Project Management 
CC 0810 Thesis Research 



SPRC€ SYST€MS OPERATIONS 
CURRICULUM 366 

The Space Systems Operations graduate 
curriculum is designed to provide officers with 
an appreciation for military opportunities and 
applications in space, a comprehensive prac- 
tical as well as theoretical knowledge of the 
operation, tasking and employment of space 
surveillance, communications, navigation, 
and atmospheric/oceanographic/environ- 
mental sensing systems, and a knowledge of 
payload design and integration. 



€ntru Dates: Space Systems Operations is 
an eight quarter course of study with a single 
entry date in October. If further information is 
needed, contact the Academic Associate or 
the Curricular Officer for this curriculum. 



SPRC€ SVST€MS OPCRRTIONS 
SU8SP6CIRLTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Space Systems Operations Sub- 
specialist with a subspecialty code of XX76. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-943, Navy 
Space Systems Division. 
Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 
Commanding Officer 

Naval Space Surviellance Systems 
Plans Officer 

North American Aerospace Defense 
Command 
Advanced Concepts Officer 

Naval Space and UUarfare Systems 
Command 
Space Defense Director 

North American Aerospace Defense 
Command 



61 



JOINT COMMAND, CONTROL, RND COMMUNICATIONS 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

This curriculum is open solely to officers 
of the U.S. firmed Forces ond selected civilion 
employees of the U.S. Federal Government. 
Admission requires a baccoloureate degree 
with above average grades, completion of 
mathematics through differential and integral 
calculus, plus at least one course in calculus- 
based engineering physics. Students lacking 
this background may matriculate through the 
engineering science program (Curriculum 
460). fi Top Secret security clearance is re- 



quired with Special Intelligence (SI) clearance 
obtainable. 

Academic Associate: 

Carl R. Jones, Professor, 

Code 54Js, Ingersoll Hall, Room 248, 

(408) 646-2767, FIV 878-2767. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Systems Technology 
(Space Operations) are met as a milestone 
en route to satisfying the skill requirements of 
the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDV 



Quarter 1 

SS 2001 (4-0) Mil Ops in Space 

MA 2050 (4-1 ) fipp Math for Cng & Ops 

Anal 
CS 2970 (5-0) Struc Prog with Pascal 
OS 2103 (4-1 ) App Prob for Sys Tech 

Quarter 2 

PH 2502 (4-0) Intro to Space Mech. 

MA 1118 (5-2) Multivariable Calculus 

CO 2710 (4-2) Intro to Signals & Sys 

OS 3604 (4-0) Decision & Data Anal 



Quarter 5 

A€ 4791 (3-2) Spacecraft Systems I 

NS 3452 (4-0) Sov Nav & Maritime Strat 

CO 3750 (3-1 ) Comm Sys Analysis 

OS 3603 (3-1 ) Sim Si UUargaming 



Quarter 6 

A€ 4792 (4-0) Spacecraft Systems II 
OA 3602 (4-0) Search Theory and Det 
MN 3301 (4-0) Sys Acq & Proj Mgmt 



Quarter 3 

PH 3514 (4-0) Intro, to Space Cnviron 

CM 31 1 1 (4-0) C3 Mission and Organ. 

CO 2740 (4-2) Communications Systems 

OS 3008 (4-0) Anal Plan Method 



Quarter 7 

SS 4001 
SS 0810 



Decisions and Space Sys 
Thesis Research 
elective 



Quarter 4 

SS 3001 (4-0) Mil App of Space 
OS 3636 (4-0) Arch of C3 Info Sys 
OC 3522 (4-2) Remote Sensing of the 
Atmosphere and Ocean 



Quarter 8 

CS 3020 (3-2) Software Design 
SS 0810 Thesis Research 

elective 



62 



€L€CTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS 



€l€CTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAMS 



Curriculor Officer 

Michael P. Donnelly, CDR, USN, 
Code 32, Spanogel Hall. Room 404, 
(408) 646-2056, AV 878-2056. 



€l€CTRONIC SVSTCMS 

€NGIN€€RING 

CURRICULUM 590 

This curriculum is designed to educate of- 
ficers in current electronics technology and its 
application to modern naval uuarfare. It es- 
tablishes a broad background of basic 
engineering knowledge, leading to selected 
advanced studies in electronic systems, ship/ 
ujeapon control systems, information proces- 
sional applicability. It will enhance individual 
performance in all duties throughout a naval 
career, including operational billets, technical 
management assignments and policy making 
positions, thereby preparing the officer for 
progressively increased responsibility includ- 
ing command, both ashore and afloat. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR 6NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree in engineering or the 
physical sciences is required. Differential ond 
integral calculus and one year of calculus 
based college physics are required. The Engi- 
neering Science Program (Curriculm 460) is 
available for candidates who do not meet all 
admission requirements. The additional time 
required will vary with the candidate's back- 
ground. Prior to undertaking the program, or 
as a part of the program, each officer will 
have earned the equivalent of an accredited 
BSEE. An APC of 323 is required for direct 
entry. 

€ntry Dates: Electronic Systems Engineer- 
ing is a nine quarter course of study with entry 
dates in every quarter. If further information is 
needed, contact the Academic Associate or 
the Curricular Officer for this curriculum. 



€l€CTRONICS & COMMUNICATIONS 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Engineering Electronics Sub- 
specialist with a subspecialty code XX55. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is Space and Naval 
UJarfore Systems Command. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Instructor 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 
OP-943F Head 

OPNAV 
Executive Officer 

SPAUUARHDQTRS 
Operations Test and Evaluation 

COMOPTEVFOR 
Electronics Maint. Officer 

USS NIMITZ CVN 68 
Executive Officer 

NEEACT PAC, Pearl Harbor, Hi. 
Electronics P & P 

CINCLANTFLT 
Ship Coordinator 

COMNAVAIRLANT 
Electronics Maint. Officer 

USS 8AINBRIDGE LCC 19 

Academic Associate: 

Robert Strum, Professor, 

Code 62St, Spanagel Hall, Room 221 A, 

(408) 646-2652, AV 878-2652. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering are 
en route to satisfying the skill-requirements 
of this curricular program. 



63 



616CTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

CC 2100 (3-2) Circuit Analysis I 
€C 2820 (3-2) Digital Logic Circuits 
MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra Si Vector 

Analysis 
CS 2450 (3-1 ) Computer Programming 

with Fortran 

Quarter 2 

CC 2110 (3-2) Circuit Analysis 
6C 2200 (3-3) electronics engineering 
MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
€C 3830 (3-2) Digital Design 
Methodology 

Quarter 3 

6C 2800 (3-2) Introduction to 

Microprocessors 
€C 2210 (3-2) electronics engineering II 
MA 3232 (3-2) Numerical Analysis 
eC 2410(3-0) Fourier Analysis of Signals 
and Systems 

Quarter 4 

eC 3800 (3-2) Microprocessor-Based 

System Design 
eC 2400 (3-0) Discrete Systems 
eC 2420 (3-0) Linear Systems 
eC 2500 (3-2) Communications Theory 

Quarter 5 

eC 3400 (3-0) Introduction to Digital 
Signal Processing 



eC 3820(3-1) 
eC 2300 (3-2) 
eC 2220 (2-4) 

Quarter 6 

eC 2600 (4-0) 

eC 3830 (3-2) 
OS 2102 (4-1) 



CS 3550 (3-2) 

Quarter 7 

eC 2610 (3-2) 

eC 3310 (4-0) 
eC 3500 (4-0) 

ec 0810 

Quarter 8 

eC 2600 (4-0) 

eC 4820(3-1) 

ec 0810 

Quarter 9 

eC 4460 (3-0) 

CS 4500 (4-1) 
eC 0810 



Computer Systems 
Control Systems 
Applied electronics (2-4) 



Introduction to Fields and 
Waves 

Digital Design 
Introduction to Applied 
Probability for electrical 
engineering 
Computers in Combat 
Systems 



electromagnetic 

engineering 

Linear Optimal estimation 

& Control 

Analysis of Random 

Signals 

Thesis 



Introduction to Fields and 

Waves 

Computer Architectures 

Thesis 



Principles of Systems 

engineering 

Software engineering 

Thesis 

elective 



64 



CLCCTRONICS RND communications 



SPRC€ SVSTCMS €NGIN€€RING 
CURRICULUM 591 

To provide officers, through graduate 
education, uuith a comprehensive scientific 
and technical knouuledge in technological 
fields applicable to military and Navy space 
systems. This curriculum is designed to equip 
officers uuith the theoretical and practical 
skills required to design and integrate mili- 
tary space payloads uuith other spacecraft 
subsystems. Officer graduates uuill be pre- 
pared by their education to design, develop, 
and manage the acquisition of space com- 
munications, navigation, surveillance, CLU and 
environmental sensing systems. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree, or its equivalent, 
in engineering or the physical sciences is pre- 
ferred. The engineering Science Program (Cur- 
riculum 460) is available for candidates uuho 
do not meet all admission requirements. The 
additional time required uuill vary uuith the 
candidate's background. Prior to undertaking 
the program, or as a part of the program, each 
officer uuill have earned the equivalent of an 
accredited BSCC. An APC of 323 is required for 
direct entry. 



€ntry Dotes: Space Systems engineering is a 
nine quarter course of study uuith entry dotes 
in January, April, July and October. If further 
information is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate for this curriculum. 



SPRC€ SVST€MS €NGIN€€RING 
SUBSPECIALTY 



Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Space Systems engineering Spe- 
cialist uuith a subspecialty code of XX77. The 
Curriculum sponsor is OP-943, Navy Space 
Systems Division. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Assistant Project Manager Satellite 
Communications 

SPALUAfi 
Manager Navy Space Project 

SPALUAR 
Head DMSP & NAVDCP, Joint Program 
Office 

Navy Space Systems Activity, Los Angeles 
Assistant for Navigation Systems 

CNO OP -943DI 
MILSTAR Systems engineering 

Navy Space Systems Activity, 

Los Angeles, Ca. 
Head Satellite Surveillance 
CNO OP-986C 

Launch & Control Systems Officer 

Naval Space Command 
Assistant for TCNCAP Systems 

OP-943C11 
Plans & Project Officer 

Naval Space Surveillance Systems 
electronics engineering Systems Dept. Head 

Navy Astronautics Group, Pt. Mugu, Ca. 



Rcodemic Associate: 

Rudolf Panholzer, Professor, 

Code 62Pz, Bullard Hall, Room 205, 
(408) 646-21 54, AV 878-21 54. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in electrical engineering are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of this curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

eC 2450 (4-2) Accel Revieuu of Systems 
CC 2250(4-2) Accel Revieuu of electronics 

engineering 
AC 2042 (3-2) Fundamentals of Thermo- 

Fluid Dynamics 
MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
SS 2001 (4-0) Military Ops in Space, I 



65 



CLCCTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS 



Quarter 2 


Quarter 6 


6C 2500 (3-2) Communications Theory 


eC 4310(3-0) Digital Control Systems 


€C 2650 (4-2) Accel Review of 


eC 3510 (3-0) Communications 


electromagnetics 


engineering 


AC 2043 (3-2) Fundamentals of Gas 


eC 3600(3-2) electromagnetic Radiation, 


Dynamics 


Scattering & Propagation 


PH 3513(4-0) Intermediate Orbital 


Ae 4792 (4-0) Spacecraft Systems II 


Mechanics 






Quarter 7 


Quarter 3 






eC 4330 (4-0) Navigation, Missile and 


MA 3232 (3-2) Numerical Analysis 


Avionics Systems 


A6 2015 (3-2) engineering Dynamics 


MS 3201 (3-2) Materials Science & 


PH 3514 (4-0) Introduction to the Space 


engineering 


environment 


SS 4001 (4-0) Decisions and Space 


Quarter 4 


Systems 
eC 0810 Thesis 


6C 2300 (3-2) Control Systems 




€C 3800 (3-2) Microprocessor-Based 


Quarter 8 


System Design 




A€ 2021 (4-1) Introduction to Flight 


eC 4590 (3-0) Communications Systems 


Structures 


Satellite engineering 


OS 2102 (4-1) Introduction to Applied 


MS 3505 (4-0) Material Selection for 


Probability for electrical 


Military Application 


engineering 


OC 3522 (4-2) Remote Sensing of the 


SS 3001 (4-0) Military Applications of 


Atmosphere & Ocean with 


Space, 1 


Laboratory 




eC 0810 Thesis 


Quarter 5 


Quarter 9 


ec 3310(4-0) Linear Optimal estimation 


and Control 


eC 4460 (3-0) Principles of Systems 


eC 3500 (4-0) Analysis of Random 


engineering 


Signals 


MN 3301 (4-0) Systems Acquisition and 


eC 3400 (3-0) Introduction to Digital 


Project Management 


Signal Processing 


eC 0810 Thesis 


Ae 4791 (3-2) Spacecraft Systems 1 


eC 0810 Thesis 



66 



eiecrRONics rnd communicrtions 



€l€CTRONIC WRRFRRC SVST6MS 

TECHNOLOGY 

CURRICULUM 595 

This curriculum provides the services with 
officers thoroughly knowledgeable in the 
technical and operational aspects of the 
role of electronic warfare as a vital, integral 
part of modern warfare. It is designed to pro- 
vide an understanding of the principles 
underlying the broad field of electronic war- 
fare, and because of the electronic nature of 
modern sensor, weapon and command, con- 
trol and communications systems, it seeks to 
develop in the officer a grasp of electronic, 
electrical and electromagnetic fundamentals, 
theory and techniques. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

To undertake studies in this curriculum 
requires a baccalaureate degree with above 
average grades and completion of mathe- 
matics courses through differential and inte- 
gral calculus. Students lacking this back- 
ground may matriculate via the engineering 
Science Program (Curriculum 460). An flPC of 
325 is required for direct entry. 

€l€CTRONIC WRRFRR6 SVSTCMS 
TECHNOLOGY SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an electronics UUarfare Systems 
Technology Subspecialist with a code of 
XX46. The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-956, 
electronic UUarfare. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Staff electronic UUarfare 

COM3RDFLT OPS CP 
CDR 

OPNAVOP-954H1 
Staff electronic UUarfare 

CINCPflCFLT 
ICDR 

FLTCORGRU 2 
flir flnti-Submarine 

COMCflRGRU 8 
Staff electronic UUarfare 

COM7THFLT 
electronic UUarfare Assistant 

VAQ33 
executive Officer 

NSGA, Naples/eCCM 



Entry Dotes: electronic UUarfare Systems 
Technology is on eight quarter course of 
study with a single entry date in October. 
If further information is needed, contact the 
Academic Associate for this curriculum. 

Rcodemic Associate: 

Alfred Cooper, Professor 

Code 61 Cr, Spanagel Hall, Room 212, 

(408) 646-2452, AV 878-2452 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Systems engineering are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of this curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURSE OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

CS 2450 (3-1) 
MA 1112 (2-2) 
MA 2129 (2-1) 

MA 2181 (2-1) 
PH 2203 (4-0) 

Quarter 2 

CO 2720 (4-2) 
OS 2103 (4-1) 
MA 3139(4-0) 

PH 2304 (2-0) 

MR 2416 (2-0) 

Quarter 3 

ei 3720(4-1) 
OS 3604 (4-0) 

CI 2760(4-1) 
eC 2810 (3-2) 
CO 2730 (2-1) 



Computer Programming 
with Fortran 

Selected Calculus Topics 
Review (2-2) 
Ordinary Differential 
equations and Laplace 
Transforms 
Vector Calculus 
Topics in Basic Physics: 
UUaves and Optics 



Introduction to electronic 

Systems 

Applied Probability for 

Systems Technology 

Fourier Analysis and 

Partial Differential 

equations 

Topics in Basic Physics: 

eiectromagnetism 

Meteorology for CUU 



Intro to Signals and Noise 
Decision and Data 
Analysis 

electromagnetic Theory 
Digital Machines 
Control Systems 



67 



6L6CTRONICS fiND COMMUNICATIONS 



Quarter 4 

60 4720 (4-1) 
OS 3003 (4-0) 



PH 2207 (4-0) 
CO 3760 (4-2) 

Quarter 5 

60 4760 (4-2) 

OS 3603 (3-1) 
PH 3271 (4-0) 
CS 3201 (3-2) 

Quarter 6 

OS 3403 (3-1 ) 



Signal Processing Systems 

Operations Research for 

€UU 

Fundamentals of €lectro 

Optics 

CM Radiation Scattering 

& Propagation 

Microwave Devices and 
Radar 

Simulation and 
UUargaming 

€lectro-Optic Principles 
and Devices 

Introduction to Computer 
Architecture 

Human Factors in 6UU 



60 4730 (3-1 ) €0 Systems and CM 
€0 4780 (3-2) electronic Warfare 
Systems 



Quarter 7 

CO 3780 (3-2) 

OS 4601 (4-0) 

CUJ0810 

6UJ0810 



electronic Warfare 
Computer Applications 
Test and evaluation 
Thesis 
Thesis 



Quarter 8 

SC 4401 (3-2) Underwater Sound 
Systems & CM 

CO 4750 (2-0) Signal Intelligence 

CO 4790 (2-0 C3 Counter Measures 
to 5-0) 

NS 3152 (4-0) Naval Warfare and the 
Threat environment 

CW0810 Thesis 



COMMUNICATIONS €NGIN€€AING 
CURRICULUM 600 

The curriculum will provide officers with a 
comprehensive scientific and technical knowl- 
in the field of communications engineering as 
applied to Navy and Defense command, con- 
trol and communication systems. It is de- 
signed to establish a broad background of 
basic engineering knowledge, leading to the 
selected advanced studies in communica- 
tions. The officer student is provided a sound 
academic background in mathematics, com- 
puter science and technology, physics and 
electrical engineering. Additionally, the sub- 
ject areas of digital signal processing, anal- 
ysis of random signals, radiation, scattering 
and propagation, and micro-processor-based 
system design are included. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree, or its equivalent, 
in engineering or the physical sciences is pre- 
ferred. The engineering Science Program (Cur- 
riculum 460) is available for candidates who 
do not meet all admission requirements. The 
additional time required will vary with the 
candidate's background. Prior to undertaking 
the program, or as a part of the program, each 
officer will have earned the equivalent of an 
accredited BSCC. An APC of 323 is required for 
direct entry. 



COMMUNICATIONS €NGIN€€RING 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Communications engineering 
Specialist with a code of XX8I. The Curriculum 
Sponsor is OP-941, Naval Communications 
Division. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty 

Communications engineering 

DeFCOMMCNGCCN, Washington, D.C. 
TACAMO Project Control 

SPAWAR 
Command Assistant for electromagnetic 

CINCPACFLT 
Decision & Control 

NOSC, San Diego, CA 
Assistant for FLTSATCOM/UH 

OPNAV OP-943C2 
Assistant for MILSTAR/CXT 

OPNAV OP-943C4 
MILAST/ADUSD 

Office of Secretary of Defense 
SR TCieCOMM 

NSA/CSS, Ft. Mead, MD 
Signal Analyst 

NSA/CSS, Ft. Mead, MD 
Plans Si Projects 

COMNAVSCCGRU, Washington, D.C. 



68 



CLeCTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS 



Academic Associate: 

Robert Strum, Professor, 

Code 62St, Sponogel Hall, Room 221 fl, 

(408) 646-2056, RV 878-2056. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in electrical engineering are 



met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of this curricular program. 

€ntry Dates: Communications engineering is 
a nine quarter course of study with entry 
dates in January , April, July and October. If fur- 
ther information is needed contact the Aca- 
demic Associate for this curriculum. 



TYPICAL COURSC OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

CC 2100 (3-2) Circuit Analysis I 
6C 2820 (3-2) Digital Logic Circuits 
MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra & Vector 

Analysis 
CS 2450 (3-1 ) Computer Programming 

with Fortran 

Quarter 2 

CC 2210(3-2) Circuit Analysis II 

CC 2200 (2-4) electronics engineering 

MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 

ec 3830 (3-2) Digital Des Method 



Quarter 3 

ec 2410 (3-0) 

ec 2210(3-2) 
MA 3232 (3-2) 



Fourier Analysis of Signals 
and Systems 
electronics engineering II 
Numerical Analysis 



ec 2400 (3-0) Discrete Systems 

Quarter 4 

ec 2500 (3-2) Communications Theory 

eC 2420 (3-0) Linear Systems 

OS 2102 (4-1 ) Intro to App Prob for Clec 

Cng 
eC 2600 (4-0) Intro to Fields & Waves 

Quarter 5 

eC 2300 (3-2) Control Systems 

eC 2220 (2-4) Applied electronics 

eC 3500 (4-0) Anal of Random Signals 

eC 2610(3-2) CM. engineering 



Quarter 6 

eC 3400 (3-0) Introduction to Digital 

Signal Processing 
eC 4590 (3-0) Comm Sat Sys Cng 
eC 3510 (3-0) Comm engineering 
eC 3600 (3-2) CM. Rad, Scat & Prop 



Quarter 7 

eC 2800 (3-2) Intro to Microprocessors 
eC 4560 (3-2) Communications CCCM 
MN 3301 (4-0) Sys Acq & Proj Mgmt 
ec 0810 Thesis 



Quarter 8 

eC 3800 (3-2) Microprocessor-Based 

System Design 
eC 4500 (4-0) Digital Communications 



ec 
ec 



0810 
0810 



Thesis 
Thesis 



Quarter 9 

CM 31 12 (4-0) Navy Telecomm Sys 
eC 0810 Thesis 

Communications elective 

elective 



69 



616CTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS 



T€L€COMMUNICRTIONS SVSTCMS 

MRNRG€M€NT 

CURRICULUM 620 and 620CG 

This curriculum provides instruction to of- 
ficers who will perform as communications 
managers of new communications systems 
applications or as communication officers in 
large commands and staffs, afloat and 
ashore, including the organization of the Joint 
Chief of Staff and the Defense Communica- 
tions figency. The 620 and 620CG curricula 
are sponsored respectively by the Director of 
Naval Communications and the U.S. Coast 
Guard Headquarters. Cach curriculum pro- 
vides comprehensive study in management, 
with emphasis upon the systems manage- 
ment field. Additionally, the curricula provide 
study in the technical field appropriate to 
decision making in advanced systems and 
program management. These technical 
courses within the 620 curriculum have been 
especially prepared for non-engineers 
whereas those in the 620CG curriculum are 
engineering courses. 



T€L€COMMUNICRTIONS SVST6MS 
MRNRG€M€NT SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Telecommunications Systems 
Management Subspecialist with a code of 
XX82. The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-941, 
Naval Communications Division. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

COMM Af 

USS JOHN F. K6NN6DV CV 67 
Commanding Officer 

NAVCOMSTA, Thurso UK 
Commanding Officer 

NAVCOMSTA, Jacksonville, Fl 
COMM OPS/FIT COAAM 

CINCUSNAV6UR 

ops t & e 

SPAUUAR PD6-120 
Staff COAAM 84/10 

6UCOM US HDQTRS 
PACAR6A SI COMM 

CNPACRT S6CGRP 




70 



CLCCTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

To undertake studies in this curriculum re- 
quires a baccalaureate degree with above 
average grades and completion of mathe- 
matics courses through single variable calcu- 
lus, fin flPC of 335 is required for direct entry. 



€ntru Dates: Telecommunications Systems 
Management is a six quarter course of study 
with a single entry date in October. The 
620CG curriculum is eight quarters in length 
and convenes in July. If further information is 
needed, contact the Academic Associate for 
these curricula. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Telecommunications 
Systems Management are met as a mile- 
stone en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



Academic Associate: 

Carl Jones, Professor, 

Code 54JS, Ingersoll Hall, Room 248, 

(408) 646-2767, AV 878-2767. 



TVPICRL COURS€ OF STUDV 

Standard Option 



Quarter 1 

MA 2050 (4-1 ) Applied Mathematics for 

engineering and Ops. 

Anal. Plus Lab 
CS 2970 (5-0) Structured Programming 

(PASCAL) 
MN 2155 (4-0) Accounting for 

Management 



Quarter 2 

CO 2710 (4-2) Introduction to Signals 

& Systems 
OS 3101 (5-0) Statistical Analysis for 

Management 
CM 31 1 1 (4-0) C3 Mission & Organization 
CS 3020 (3-2) Software Design 



Quarter 3 

CO 2750 (4-2) Communications Systems 
OS 3005 (4-0) Operations Research for 

Communications Mgrs. 
CM 3112 (4-0) Naval Telecommunications 

Systems 
OS 3404 (3-0) Man-Machine Interaction 



Quarter 4 

IS 3502 (4-0) Computer Networks: UUide 

Area/Local Area 
CM 3001 (4-0) economic evaluation of 

Telecommunications 

Systems I 
MN 4125 (4-0) Managing Planned 

Change in Complex 

Organizations 

Quarter 5 

€1 3750 (3-1 ) Communication Systems 

Analysis 
CM 3002 (4-0) economic evaluation of 

Telecommunications 

Systems II 
MN 3301 (4-0) Systems Acquisition and 

Project Management 
MR 2419 (2-0) Atmospheric Factors in C3 
CM 0810 Thesis Research 

Quarter 6 

CM 4502 (4-0) Telecommunications 

Networks 
CM 4925 (4-0) Telecommunications 

Systems, Industry, 

Regulation 
CM 0810 Thesis Research 

CM 0810 Thesis Research 



71 



6L6CTRONICS RND COMMUNICATIONS 



Coast Guard Option 



Quarter 1 

6C 21 70 (4-2) Intro to 6lec 6ng 
MA 1116 (5-0)Multivorioble Calculus 
CS 2950 (5-0) Structured Programming 

with FORTRAN 
MN 3105 (4-0) Organization and Mgmt. 

Quarter 2 

CC 21 10 (3-2) Circuit Analysis II 

MA 2049 (4-0) Applied Mathematics for 

6ng. Qnd Ops. Analysis 
OS 3404 (3-0) Man-Machine Interactions 
MN 2155 (4-0) Accounting for Mgmt 

Quarter 3 

CO 2720 (4-2) Intro to electronic Sys 
CS 3010 (4-0) Comp Devices 5» Sys 
OS 3101 (5-0) Stat Anal for Mgmt 
MN 41 25 (4-0) Managing Planned Change 
in Complex Organizations 

Quarter 4 

€1 3720 (4-1 ) Intro to Signals & Noise 
OS 3005 (4-0) Op Res for Comm Mgrs 
CM 31 12 (4-0) Navy Telecomm Sys 
CM 31 1 1 (4-0) C3 Mission & Org 



Quarter 5 

CS 3020 (3-2) Software Design 

IS 3502 (4-0) Computer Networks: Wide 

Rrea/Local Rrea 
CM 3001 (4-0) 6con Cval of Telecomm 

Sys I 

Quarter 6 

€1 3750(3-1) Comm Sys Rnal 

CS 3030 (4-0) Operating Sys Struc 

CM 3002 (4-0) €con Cval of Telecomm 

Sys II 
CM 0810 Thesis 

Quarter 7 

CM 4925 (4-0) Telecomm Sys, Ind, Reg 
CM 0810 Thesis 

Quarter 8 

6C 2250 (4-2) Accelerated Review of 
electronics engineering 
MN 3301 (4-0) Sys Rcq & Proj Mgmt 
CM 0810 Thesis 




72 



NATIONAL SECURITY AFffilRS/INT€UIG€NC€ 



NATIONAL S€CURITV AND INT€IUG€NC€ programs 



Curriculor Officer 

James W. Mueller, CAPT, USN, 
Code 38. Root Hall, Room 216. 
(408) 646-2228, RV 878-2228. 



Assistant Curriculor Officer 

Kerry M. Tittle, ITJG. USNR, 
Code 381, Root Hall, Room 21 1, 
(408) 646-2845, RV 878-2845. 



MIDDL€ CAST, AFRICR, SOUTH ASIA 
CURRICULUM 681 

Area Studies curricula focus on the history, 
culture, and religion of a specific region or 
country and provide students with a knowl- 
edge of currrent issues, economic and polit- 
ical structures and institutions, military forces, 
including strategic capabilities and policy im- 
plications, and geopolitical influences. Most 
include language study at the Defense Lan- 
guage Institute. 



R€©UIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

Prospective students must be U.S. military 
officers or civilian employees of the U.S. 
goverment eligible for a Top Secret Clear- 
ance with access to Sensitive Compartment- 
ed Information based on a Special Back- 
ground investigation completed within the 
past five years. Students must have a bacca- 
laureate degree earned with above average 
academic performance and an RPC of 365. 
College-level preparation in basic descriptive 
and inferential statistics is required. In addi- 
tion, those students whose sponsors require 
language training must have a score of at 
least 85 on the Defense Language Aptitude 
Battery or language proficiency validated by 
the Defense Language Proficiency Test. 



€ntru Dotes: Area Studies are four quarter 
courses of study with entry dates in January 
and July. In addition, two to four quarters of 
language instruction are required. If in- 
formation is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate or the Curriculor Officer for this 
curriculum. 



MID CAST, AFRICA, SOUTH RSIR 
SUBSKCIAITV 

Completion of the 681 curriculum qualifies 
an officer as a Mid Cast, Africa, South Asia 
Subspecialist with subspecialty code of 
XX21 . The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-06, Chief 
of Naval Operations (Plans, Policy and 
Operations). 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Operations Intelligence 

Commander Middle Cast Force 
STf Operations and Plans 

Commander Middle Cast for Bahrain 
POL - MIL Planner 

Joint Chiefs of Staff, UUashington, D.C. 
Mid Cast/Southwest Asia Policy 

CINCUSNAVCUR LONDON 
Area Officer 

DIA 
Head, Middle Cast, Asia, Southwest Asia 

OP-61 1 
Military Assistance Program 

Military Liaison Office Tunisia 
CTRY Director - Acting Officer 

Office of the Secretary of Defense 
Navigator 

AGF 3 LaSalk 
Intelligence Office Iran 

DIA 

Acodemic Associote: 

CJ. Laurance, Associate Professor, 
Code 56Lk, Root Hall, Room 101 A, 
(408) 646-2831, AV 878-2831. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree of 
Master of Arts in National Security Affairs are 
met en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curriculor program. 



73 



NATIONAL S6CURITV AFFAIRS/INT€LUG€NC€ 



Quarter I 

NS 3010 

NS3XXX 
NS3XXX 
NS 3020 

Quarter 2 

NS 3030 

NS 3040 

NS3XXX 
NS4XXX 



TYPICAL COURS6 OF STUD V 



Quarter 3 



Comparative Analysis and 


NS3XXX 


Research Methods 


NS 3XXX 


Rrea specialty course 


NS4XXX 


Rrea specialty course 


NS4XXX 


Analysis of International 




Relations 


Quarter 4 




NS3XXX 


American National Security 


NS4XXX 


Policy 


NS4XXX 


The Politics of Global eco- 


NS0810 


nomic Relations 


or 


Rrea specialty course 


NS0811 


Rrea specialty course 





Rrea specialty course 
Rrea specialty course 
Functional course 
Rrea specialty course 



Rrea specialty course 
Functional course 
Rrea specialty course 
Thesis Preparation 

Preparation for Compre- 
hensive examination 



Note: This year of academic coursework will 
normally be preceded or follouued by two to 
four quarters of language instruction at 
the Defense Language Institute. 



FAR €RST, SOUTHEAST, PACIFIC 
CURRICULUM 682 

Rrea Studies curricula focus on the history, 
culture, and religion of a specific region or 
country and provide students with a knowl- 
edge of current issues, economic and polit- 
ical structures and institutions, military forces, 
including strategic capabilities and policy im- 
plications, and geopolitical influences. Most 
include language study at the Defense Lan- 
guage Institute. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

Prospective students must be U.S. military 
officers or civilian employees of the U.S. 
government eligible for a Top Secret Clear- 
ance with access to Sensitive Compartment- 
ed Information based on a Special Back- 
ground Investigation completed within the 
past five years. Students must have a bacca- 
laureate degree earned with above average 
academic performance and an RPC of 365. 
College-level preparation in basic descriptive 
and inferential statistics is required. In addi- 
tion, those students whose sponsors require 
language training must have a score of at 
least 85 on the Defense Language Rptitude 
Battery or language proficiency validated by 
the Defense Language Proficiency Test. 



FRR €RST, SOUTHCAST, PACIFIC 
SUBSPCCIRLTV 

Completion of the 682 curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Far Cast, Southeast, Pacific Sub- 
speciaiist with a subspecialty code of XX22. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is OP-06, Chief of 
Naval Operations (Plans, Policy and Opera- 
tions). 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Chief of Staff 

COMNRVBRSC GURM 
Staff Negotiations Representative 

USCINPRC R6P PHILIPPIN6S 
Staff Operations and Plans 

CINCPRCFLT 
Faculty Member 

DIR 
OP-635C Rssistant for Military Sales 

OPNRV-FOR6IGN MILITRRV 
Rnalyst 

OPNRVSUPPRCT. UJashinaton, D.C. 
€ntru Dates: Rrea Studies are four quarter 
courses of study with entry dates in January 
and July. In addition, two to four quarters of 
language instruction ore required. If further in- 
formation is needed, contact the Rcademic 
Rssociate or the Curricular Officer for this 
curriculum. 



74 



NRTIONAl SECURITY flFFfilRS/INT€LUG€NC€ 



Rcodcmic Associate: 
€J. Laurance, Associate Professor, 
Code 56lk, Root Hall, Room 101R, 
(408) 646-2831, RV 878-2831. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree of 
Master of Rrts in National Security Rffairs are 
met en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURS€ Of STUDY 



Quarter 1 

NS3010 

NS3XXX 
NS3XXX 
NS 3020 

Quarter 2 

NS 3030 

NS 3040 

NS3XXX 
NS4XXX 





Quarter 3 


Comparative Analysis and 


NS3XXX 


Research Methods 


NS 3XXX 


Rrea specialty course 


NS4XXX 


Rrea specialty course 


NS4XXX 


Analysis of International 




Relations 






Quarter 4 




NS3XXX 


American National Security 


NS4XXX 


Policy 


NS4XXX 


The Politics of Global Eco- 


NS0810 


nomic Relations 


or 


Area specialty course 


NS0811 


Area specialty course 





Area specialty course 
Area specialty course 
Functional course 
Area specialty course 



Area specialty course 
Functional course 
Area specialty course 
Thesis Preparation 

Preparation for Compre- 
hensive examination 



Note: This year of academic coursework 
will normally be preceded or followed by two 
to four quarters of language instruction at 
the Defense Language Institute. 



€UROP€ AND USSR 
CURRICULUM 683 



Area Studies curricula focus on the history, 
culture, and religion of a specific region or 
country and provide students with a knowl- 
edge of currrent issues, economic and polit- 
ical structures and institutions, military forces, 
including strategic capabilities and policy im- 
plications, and geopolitical influences. Most 
include language study at the Defense Lan- 
guage Institute. 



€UROP€ RND USSR 

SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of the 683 curriculum qualifies 
on officer as a Curope/USSR Subspecialist 
with a subspecialty code of XX24. The Cur- 
riculum Sponsor is OP-06,Chief of Naval Oper- 
ations (Plans, Policy ond Operations). 
€ntru Dates: Area Studies are four quarter 
courses of study with entry dates in January 
and July. In addition, two to four quarters of 
language instruction are required. If further in- 
formation is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate or the Curricular Officer for this 
curriculum. 



75 



NATIONAL S6CURITV AFFAIAS/INT€UIG€NC€ 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Staff Plan 

NRTO 
ACOS For Plans 

SACLANT 
POL-MIL Planner 

Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Geopolitical Intelligence Office 

CINCUSNAVeUR LONDON 
Atlantic Allied Plans 

COMIN6WRRCOM 
Naval Coordinator 

6UCOM 
Staff Infrastructure Policy 

SHRPC 
Rrea Officer 

DIR 
NRTO Strategic Concepts 

OPNRV 
Country Director Spain and Portugal 

Office of Secretary of Defense 

Degree: Requirements for the degree of 
Master of Rrts in National Security Rffairs are 
met en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

Prospective students must be U.S. military 
officers or civilian employees of the U.S. 
government eligible for a Top Secret Clear- 
ance with access to Sensitive Compartment- 
ed Information based on a Special Rack- 
ground Investigation completed uuithin the 
past five years. Students must have a bacca- 
laureate degree earned with above average 
academic performance and an RPC of 365. 
College-level preparation in basic descriptive 
and inferential statistics is required. In addi- 
tion, those students whose sponsors require 
language training must have a score of at 
least 85 on the Defense Language Rptitude 
flattery or language proficiency validated by 
the Defense Language Proficiency Test. 



Academic Associate: 

€J. Laurance, Rssociate Professor, 
Code 56Lk, Root Hall, Room 101R, 
(408) 646-2831, RV 878-2831. 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDV 



Quarter 3 



Quarter 1 



NS 3XXX 
NS 3XXX 
NS4XXX 
NS4XXX 



Quarter 4 

NS3XXX 
NS4XXX 
NS4XXX 
NS0810 

or 
NS0811 



Rrea specialty course 
Rrea specialty course 
Functional course 
Rrea specialty course 



Rrea specialty course 
Functional course 
Rrea specialty course 
Thesis Preparation 

Preparation for Compre- 
hensive examination 



NS 3010 Comparative Rnalysis and 

Research Methods 
NS 3XXX Rrea specialty course 
NS 3XXX Rrea specialty course 
NS 3020 Rnalysis of International 
Relations 

Quarter 2 

NS 3030 Rmerican National Security 
Policy 

NS 3040 The Politics of Global eco- 
nomic Relations 

NS 3XXX Rrea specialty course 

NS 4XXX Area specialty course 



Note: This year of academic coursework 
will normally be preceded or followed by two 
to four quarters of language instruction at 
the Defense Language Institute. 

76 



NATIONAL S6CURITV AFFAIRS/INT6LUG6NC6 



INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

AND NEGOTIATIONS 

CURRICULUM 684 

This curriculum focuses on the security re- 
lationships between the United States and 
other nation states. Courses address the 
implications of both governmental and non- 
governmental actions, the organization and 
structure through which relationships are con- 
ducted, and the development of international 
institutions and policies that provide guide- 
lines for such interaction, including inter- 
national law, the law of war, and the law of 
the sea. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR €NTRV 

Prospective students must be U.S. military 
officers or civilian employees of the U.S. 
government eligible for a Top Secret clear- 
ance with access to Sensitive Compartment- 
ed Information based on a Special Back- 
ground Investigation completed within the 
past five years. Students must have a bacca- 
laureate degree earned with above average 
academic performance and an APC of 365. 
College level preparation in basic descriptive 
and inferential statistics is required. 



€ntry Dotes: International Organizations 
and Negotiation is a six quarter course of 
study with a single entry date in July. If further 
information is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate or the Curricular Officer for this 
curriculum. 



INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 
AND NEGOTIATIONS SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of the 684 curriculum qualifies 
an officer as a International Organizations 
and Negotiations Subspecialist with a sub- 
specialty code of XX25. The Curriculum 
Sponsor is OP-06, Chief of Naval Operations 
(Plans, Policy and Operations). 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Liaison Officer 

P€P Bahamas 
force Requirements/Programs Office 

SACLANT 
Representative for International Negotia- 
tions 

Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Intelligence Affairs Officer 

CUCOM US HQ 
Military Assistant 

U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament 
Ship Operations 

COMSC M€D 
Head, Ocean Policy Branch 

OPNAV 
Chief 

DIA 
Assistant for Nuclear Negotations 

OPNAV 
Strategic Policy Planner 

Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Academic Associate: 
Frank M. Teti, Associate Professor, 
Code 56TT, Root Hall, Room 201, 
(408) 646-2528, AV 878-2528. 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Arts in National Security Affairs are 
met en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURSE OF STUDV 



Quarter 1 




Quarter 2 


NS3010 


Comparative Analysis and 
Research Methods 


NS 3030 


NS 3400 


Domestic Content of Soviet 
National Security Policy 


NS 3040 


NS 3900 


International Organizations 


NS 3410 




and Negotiations 


NS 3902 


NS 3020 


International Relations 





American National Security 

Policy 

The Politics of Global 

economic Relations 

Soviet Notional Security 

Modern Revolution and 

Political Terrorism 



77 



NATIONAL SECURITY AFFfllRS/INT€LUG€NC€ 



Quarter 3 

NS 3960 
NS 3450 
NS 4500 

NS 4902 



Quarter 4 

NS 4251 

NS 3021 
NS 4900 
NS 3452 



International law 

Soviet Military Strategy 

Seminar in the National 

Interest 

Seminar on Modern 

Revolution and Terrorism 



Rmerican National Security 

Objectives and Net 

Assessment 

The Role of the Superpowers 

in the Third World 

Seminar in International 

Negotiations 

Soviet Naval and Maritime 

Strategy 



Quarter 5 




NS 4250 


Problems at Security 




Rssistence and Rrms 




Transfers 


NS 4262 


Seminar in Strategic 




Deception 


NS 4901 


Seminar in Ocean Policy 


NS0810 


Thesis Preparation 


Quarter 6 




NS 3961 


The Law of War 


NS 4040 


Strategic Resources and 




U.S. National Security Policy 


NS 4950 


Seminar in Rrms Control and 




National Security 


NS0810 


Thesis Preparation 



W€ST€RN H€MISPH€R€ 
CURRICULUM 685 

Rrea Studies curricula focus on the history, 
culture, and religion of a specific region or 
country and provide students with a knowl- 
edge of currrent issues, economic and polit- 
ical structures and institutions, military forces, 
including strategic capabilities and policy im- 
plications, and geopolitical influences. Most 
include language study at the Defense Lan- 
guage Institute. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

Prospective students must be U.S. military 
officers or civilian employees of the U.S. 
government eligible for a Top Secret Clear- 
ance with access to Sensitive Compartment- 
ed Information based on a Special Sack- 
ground Investigation completed within the 
past five years. Students must have a bacca- 
laureate degree earned with above average 
academic performance and on RPC of 365. 
College-level preparation in basic descriptive 
and inferential statistics is required. In addi- 
tion, those students whose sponsors require 
language training must have a score of at 
least 85 on the Defense Language Rptitude 
Battery or language proficiency validated by 
the Defense Language Proficiency Test. 



W€ST€RN H€MISPH€R€ 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Western Hemisphere Subspecial- 
ist with a subspecialty code of XX23. The Cur- 
riculum Sponsor is OP-06, Chief of Naval 
Operations (Plans, Policy and Operations). 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Political Military Planner 

Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Executive Assistant 

Inter American Defense 
Air Anti-Submarine Warfare/Plans 

COMSOLANTFOR 
Strategy and Policy Central and South 
Atlantic 

USCINCLANT 
Intelligence Analyst 

USCINCSO 
Area Officer 

DIA 
OP-61361 CUBA/CARI88CRN 

OPNRV 
Assistant for Military Sale 

OPNAV-FORCIGN MILITARV 
CTRY director 

Office of Secretary of Defense 
OP-613C Assistant Branch Head South 
America 



78 



NATIONAL S6CURITV AFf AIAS/INT€LUG€NC€ 



Academic Associate: 

6.J. laurance, Associate Professor, 
Code 56Lk, Root Hall, Room 101R 
(408) 646-2831. RV 878-2831. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree of 
Master of Rrts in National Security Rffairs are 
met en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



€ntru Dates: Area Studies are four quarter 
courses of study with entry dates in January 
and July. In addition, two to four quarters of 
language instruction are required. If further in- 
formation is needed, contact the Academic 
Associate or Curricular Officer for this 
curriculum. 

Note: This year of academic coursework will 
normally be preceded or followed by two to 
four quarters of language instruction at the 
Defense Language Institute. 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

NS 3010 
NS 3020 
NS 3501 
NS3510 



Comparative Analysis and 

Research Methods 

Rnalysis of International 

Relations 

History and Culture of Latin 

Rmerica 

Problems of Government and 

Security in Latin Rmerica 



Quarter 3 

NS 3520 

NS 3540 
NS4510 
NS 4550 



International Relations and 

Security Problems of Latin 

Rmerica 

Political Cconomy of Latin 

Rmerican Development 

Strategy 

Seminar in Problems of 

Government and Security in 

Latin Rmerica 

Seminar in Government and 

Politics in Latin Rmerica 







Quarter 4 








NS4010 


Seminar in Comparative 
Regional Security 


Quarter 2 




NS 4560 


Seminar in International 
Security Problems of Latin 


NS 3030 


Rmerican National Security 




America 




Policy 


NS 4902 


Seminar on Modern 


NS 3040 


The Politics of Global 




Revolution and Terrorism 




economic Relations 


NS0810 


Thesis Preparation 


NS 3580 


U.S. Interests in Latin Rmerica 


or 




NS 3550 


The Role of the Military in 


NS0811 


Preparation for 




Latin Rmerica 




Comprehensive Cxaminatic 



79 



I NRTIONfll SECURITY flFFRIRS/INT€lUG€NC€ 



STRRT6GIC PLANNING 
CURRICULUM 687 

This curriculum is designed to provide the 
student with on understanding of the genera- 
tion and use of military power in support of 
notional objectives, the process of U.S. stra- 
tegic decision-making, and the deployment 
of military forces, including maritime nuclear 
strategic and theater forces in peacetime and 
under conditions of conventional and nuclear 
war. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

Entrance is open to officers and civilian 
employees of the U.S. government eligible 
for o Top Secret clearance with access to Sen- 
sitive Compartmented Information based on 
a Special Background Investigation com- 
pleted within the past five years. R baccalau- 
reate degree earned with above average 
academic performance and a minimum RPC 
of 345 ore required. 

€ntry Dates: Strategic Planing is a six 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
January and July. If further information is 
needed, contact the Rcademic Rssociate or 
the Curricular Officer of this curriculum. 

Rcademic Associate: 

Frank M. Teti, Associate Professor, 
Code 56Tt, Root Hall, Room 201, 
(408) 646-2528, RV 878-2528. 



STRRTCGIC PLANNING 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of the 687 curriculum qualifies 
an officer as a Strategic Planning Subspecial- 
ist with subspecialty codes of XX27 and 
XX26. The Curriculum sponsor is OP-06, Chief 
of Naval Operations (Plans, Policy and 
Operations). 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

International Plans 

COMCRNLRNT 
War Plans 

CINCUSNRV6UR 
Staff Plans 

SHRPC 
NRTO Plans Officer 

COMSTRIKCFUIRNT 
Navy Plans Officer 

Special Operations 
Nuclear UJeapons/Rir Warfare 
Instructor 

NUCWCRPTRRGRIRNT/PRC 
SS8N Current Operations 

USCINCLRNT 
Head Trident Strategic Weapons 

OPNRV 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Rrts in National Security Rffairs are 
met en route to satisfying the skill require- 
ments of the curricular program. 



YVPICRL COURS6 OF STUDV 



Quarter 1 

NS3152 

OS3101 
NS 3400 
NS 3020 

Quarter 2 

NS 3030 

NS 3040 
NS3150 
NS3410 



Naval Warfare and the 
Threat environment 
Statistical Analysis for 
Management 

Domestic Context of Soviet 
Notional Security Policy 
Analysis of International 
Relations 



Rmerican National Security 

Policy 

The Politics of Global 

economic Relations 

Intelligence Data Rnalysis 

and Research Methods 

Soviet National Security 



Quarter 3 




NS 4500 


Seminar in the National 




Interest 


NS 3230 


Strategic Planning and U.S. 




National Security Policy 


NS 3450 


Soviet Military Strategy 


Quarter 4 




NS 3250 


Defense Resources 


NS 3280 


Nuclear Weapons and 




Foreign Policy 


NS 3452 


Soviet Naval and Maritime 




Strategy 


NS 4251 


Rmerican Not Sec Obj and 




Net Assessment 


NS 4230 


Seminar in Strategic Planning 



80 



NflTIONfil SECURITY RFFfllRS/INT€UIG€NC€ 



Quarter 5 




Quarter 6 


NS 4250 


Problems of Security 






Assistance and firms 


PH 3600 


NS 3902 


Modern Revolution and 






Political Terrorism 


NS 4040 


NS 4262 


Seminar in Strategic 






Deception 


NS 4261 


NS0810 


Thesis Preparation 


NS0810 



UUeapons Systems and 
UUeapons Effects 
Strategic Resources and 
U.S. National Security Policy 
Survey of Strategic Studies 
Thesis Preparation 



INT€LUG€NC€ 
CURRICULUM 825 

This curriculum is a technical, interdisciplin- 
ary program integrating the study of political 
science, data analysis, aeronautical engi- 
neering, operations research, physics, elec- 
trical engineering, information systems, and 
oceanography into an understanding of intel- 
ligence. 

Coursework addresses three broad fields: 
defense technology, analysis and manage- 
ment, and national security affairs. Defense 
technology courses are designed to address 
the special problems of technical intelligence, 
emphasizing technical literacy. The analysis 
and management sequence provides a 
grounding in quantitative techniques and 
research methods. National security affairs 
courses address the interface betuueen inter- 
national politics and national security 
objectives. 



R€QUIfl€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

Prospective students must be U.S. military 
officers or civilian employees of the U.S. gov- 
ernment eligible for a Top Secret clearance 
with access to Sensitive Compartmented 
Information based on a Background Investi- 
gation completed uuithin the past five years. 
They must have a baccalaureate degree 
earned with above average academic per- 
formance and a minimum RPC of 334. 

€ntru Dates: Intelligence is a six quarter 
course of study with starting dates in fipril 
and October. In addition, all students will 
report for a math and physics refresher in mid 
February or mid Rugust. If further information 
is needed contact the Rcademic Rssociate or 
the Curricular Officer of this curriculum. 



INT€LUG€NC€ SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Intelligence Specialist with a 
subspecialty code of XXI 7. The Curriculum 
Sponsor is Naval Intelligence Command. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Operations Intelligence Rnalyst 

NRVOPINTC6N, UUashington, D.C. 
Technical Intelligence 

COMNFIVFOR JfiPfiN 
Naval Rttache 

Rttache USSR 
Commander Shore Rctivity 

NISC, UUashington, D.C. 
Staff Operations/Submarine Operations 

CINCUSNfiVCUR LONDON 
Intelligence Officer 

COMSUBGRU 
Surface Rnalyst 

FOSIF ROTR SPRIN 
Tactical Intelligence 

Office of the Secretary of Defense 
Intelligence Officer 

UUar College,, Newport, R.I. 
Intelligence Production Rnalyst 

NORRD/FIDCOM JNT SUPP 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in National Security Rffairs 
are met en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 

Rcademic Rssociate: 

Robert L Rrmstead, Rssociate Professor, 
Code 61 Rr, Spanagel Hall, Room 1 12, 
(408) 646-2125, RV 878-2125. 

N.K. Green, LCDR, USN, 

Code 56Gn, Root Hall, Room 209, 

(408) 646-3038, RV 878-3038 



81 



NRTIONfll S6CURITV flFFfllRS/INT€LUG€NC€ 




TVPICflL COURSC OF STUDV 



Quarter 1 




OC 2001 


Ocean Systems 


NS2154 


Intelligence and the Military 


NS3150 


Intelligence Data Analysis 




and Research Methods 


NS 3030 


American National Security 




Policy 


Quarter 2 




S6 2002 


6lectro-magnetic Systems 


OS 3404 


Man-Machine Interaction 


NS 3450 


Soviet Military Strategy 


NS 3020 


Analysis of International 




Relations 


Quarter 3 




A€ 3005 


Survey of Aircraft: and Missile 




Technology 


NS3410 


Soviet National Security 


NS 4251 


American National Security 




Objectives and Net 




Assessment 


NS3151 


Intelligence Systems and 




Products 



Quarter 4 




€1 2790 


Communications Systems 




Analysis 


NS 3902 


Modern Revolution and 




Political Terrorism 


NS 4500 


Seminar in the National 




Interest 


NS 4250 


Problems of Security 




Assistance and Arms 




Transfers 


Quarter 5 




S€ 3004 


Weapons Systems Analysis 


OS 3002 


Operations Research for 




Intelligence 


NS 3452 


Soviet Naval and Maritime 




Strategy 


NS0810 


Thesis Preparation 


Quarter 6 




S€ 4006 


Technical Assessment and 




Intelligence Systems 


NS4152 


Problems of Intelligence 




and Threat Analysis 


NS0810 


Thesis Preparation 


IS 3606 


Management Information 




Systems and the Computer 



82 



NAVAL €NGIN€€AING 



NfWni €NGIN€€RING PROGRAMS 



Curriculor Officer: 

Walter fi. €ricson, CAPT, USN 
Code 34, Halligan Hall, Room 220, 
(408) 646-2033, flV 878-2033 



NAVAL €NGIN€€MNG PROGRAMS 
CURRICULUM 570 



The objective of this program is to provide 
graduate education, primarily in the field of 
Mechanical engineering. The graduate will 
have the technical competence to operate 
and maintain modern warships and naval 
systems. He will be able to participate in 
technical aspects of naval systems acquisi- 
tions for technological advances in naval 
ships and systems. Through emphasis on the 
design aspect within the program, the gradu- 
ate will be well prepared to apply these ad- 
vances in technology to the warships of the 
future, fin original research project resulting 
in a finished thesis is an integral part of the 
curriculum. The schedule of classes is arranged 
to provide time during the final two quarters 
for concentration in this area of specializa- 
tion. 



R<EQUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 



A baccalaureate degree or its equivalent 
is required, preferably in an engineering dis- 
cipline. A minimum academic profile code 
(APC) of 323 (334 via Engineering Science 
Curriculum, 460) is required. This equates to a 
minimum grade point average of 2.20, with 
mathematics through differential and integral 
calculus, and one year of calculus based 
physics as non-waiverable requirements. The 
program is open to naval officers in the rank 
of LTJG through LCDR in the 1 1 XX/ 1 4XX com- 
munity, equivalent grade officers of other 
U.S. services, and qualified foreign military 
officers. DoD employees are also eligible. 
Current enrollment is approximately 1 1 5 
students. 



NRVAL €NGIN€€RING 
SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Naval Engineering Specialist with 
a subspecialty code XX54P. The Curriculum 
Sponsor is Naval Sea Systems Command. A 
limited number of particularly well qualified 
students may be able to further their educa- 
tion beyond the Master's Degree and seek 
the degree of Mechanical Engineer and a 
XX54N Subspecialty Code. 
Typical Subspecialty Assignments: 

Upon award of the XX54P subspecialty 
code, the officer becomes eligible for assign- 
ment to those billets identified as requiring 
graduate education in Naval Engineering. 
Typical of these billets are the following: 

Industrial Activities — Shipyard, SUPSHIP, 
Ship Repair Facility 

Mechanical Engineering Instructor, USNA 

Tender Repair Officer (Engineering Duty 
Officer) 

Fleet/Type Commander Staff 

SIMA 

Board of Inspection and Survey 

Propulsion Examining Board 
€ntry Dates: Naval Engineering is an eight 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
April and October. For Engineering Duty Of- 
ficers, the program is nine quarters long. If fur- 
ther information is needed, contact the Aca- 
demic Associate or the Curriculor Officer for 
this curriculum. 

Academic Associate: 

Robert H. Nunn, Professor, 
Code 69Nn, Halligan Hall, Room 207, 
(408) 646-3424, AV 878-3424. 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
are met as a milestone en route to satisfying 
the skill requirements of the curriculor pro- 
gram. 



83 



NflVRL ENGINEERING 



TVPICflL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter I 

MR 1118 (5-2) Multivariate Calculus 
6C 2170 (4-2) Intro to Electrical Eng 
M€ 2101 (4-1) Thermodynamics 
M6 2501 (3-0) Statics 

Quarter 2 

MR 2047 (4-0) Linear Rlgebra & Vector 

Rnalysis 
M€ 2440 (3-0) Methods of Eng 

Computation 
ME 2441 (0-2) 6ng Computational Lab 
ME 2502 (4-1) Dynamics 
M€ 2601 (3-2) Solid Mechanics I 

Quarter 3 

MR 2121 (4-0) Ordinary Differential 

Equations 
EC 2370 (3-2) Electromech Energy 

Conversion 
M€ 3611 (4-0) Solid Mechanics II 
ME 2201 (3-2) Intro to Fluid Mechanics 

Quarter 4 

MR 3132 (4-0) Partial Differential 

Equations 
ME 3150 (4-2) Heat Transfer 
ME 2410 (2-3) Mechanical Engineering 

Lab 
ME 3201 (3-2) Intermediate Fluid 

Mechanics 

Quarter 5 

*ME 2301 (4-0) Intro to Naval Architecture 
MS 3201 (3-2) Materials Science 
ME 3220 (3-2) Auxiliary & Turbomachinery 
ME 371 1 (4-1 ) Design of Machine 
Elements 



Quarter 6 

MR 3232 (3-2) Numerical Rnalysis 
MS 3202 (3-2) Failure Rnalysis 
ME 3521 (3-2) Vibrations 
ME 3240 (3-0) Reciprocating Si Gas 
Turbine Power plants 
ME 3241 (0-3) Marine Eng Lab 

Quarter 7 

ME 3801 (3-2) Linear Rutomatic Controls 
ME 3230 (4-0) Nuclear Power Systems 
ME 4XXX Elective 

ME 4XXX Elective 

Quarter 8 

ME 4802 (3-2) Marine Propulsion Control 

Systems 
*ME 4XXX Elective 

ME 0810 Thesis 

ME 0810 Thesis 

Quarter 9 

*OS 3104 (4-0) Statistics for Science & 

Engineering 
*ME 4XXX Elective 

ME 0810 Thesis 

ME 0810 Thesis 



*Unrestricted Line Officers do not take 
asterisked courses. 



84 



OP6RRTIONS RNflLVSIS 



OP€RfiTIONS RNRIVSIS PROGRRMS 



Curriculor Officer 

Thomas €. Halwachs, CDR, U.S.N. 
Code 30, Root Hall, Room 232, 
(408) 646-2786, AV 878-2786. 



OP€RRTIONS RNflLVSIS 
CURRICULUM 360 

This program provides education in the 
application of quantitative analyses to oper- 
ational, tactical, and managerial problems. 
The disciplines of mathematics, probability, 
statistics, economics, human factors, physi- 
cal science, and optimization which the officer 
student learns here, or brings with him, supply 
the theoretical background for analyzing 
alternative choices in tactical and strategic 
warfare and in planning, budgeting and pro- 
curement of systems and forces. The course of 
study generates computational capability 
and develops skills in identifying relevant 
information, generating decisions criteria, 
and selecting alternatives. This education 
enhances performance in all duties through- 
out a military career, including operational 
billets, technical management assignments 
and policy making positions. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

R baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades in mathematics is required. Com- 
pletion of mathematics through single vari- 
able differential and integral calculus is con- 
sidered minimal preparation. A one year 
course in college physics is highly desired. 
Students lacking these quantitative prereq- 
uisites will be accepted, in certain cases, 
where their under-graduate records indicate 
that they are exceptional students and there 
are other possible indicators of success such 
as Graduate Record examination scores, cor- 
respondence or extension courses in quanti- 
tative subjects, and outstanding motivation 
for the program. Rn RPC of 324 is required. 



OPCRRTIONS RNRLVSIS 
SUBSKCIRLTV 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as on Operations Rnalysis Subspecial- 
ist with a subspecialty code of XX42P. The 
Curriculum Sponsor is OP-91, Program 
Resource Appraisal Division. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Destroyer Squadron Chief Staff Officer 
OPNAV Air UUarfare Program Analyst 
JCS Analyst 

Director OPS Research, SACLANT 
Asst Staff OPS/PLANS, COMCARGRU 
Staff OPS & PLANS, COMTHIRDFLT 



€ntry Dates: Operations Analysis is on eight 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
April and October. If further information 
is needed, contact the Academic Associate 
for this curriculum or the Curricular Officer. 



Academic Associate: 

James D. Csary, Professor, 

Code 55Cy, Root Hall, Room 273, 

(408) 646-2780, AV 878-2780. 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Operations Research are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of the curricular program. 



85 



OP6RATIONS ANfilVSIS 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

Ofl 2200 (4-1) Computational Methods 
for Operations Research 
Mfl 1116 (5-0) Multivariate Calculus 
MA 2042 (4-0) Linear Algebra 
OA 3101 (4-1) Probability 

Quarter 2 

OA 2600 (4-0) Introduction to Operations 

Analysis 
MA 31 10 (4-0) Topics in Intermediate 

Analysis 
PH 3321 (4-0) Radiating Systems 
OA 3102 (4-1) Probability and Statistics 

Quarter 3 

OA 3201 (4-0) Linear Programming 

OA 3401 (4-0) Human Factors in Systems 

Design l-ll 
OA 3301 (4-0) Stochastic Models I 
OA 3103 (4-1) Statistics 

Quarter 4 

OA 3602 (4-0) Search Theory and 

Detection 
AS 3610(4-0) economic Analysis and 

Operations Research 
OA 3302 (4-0) Systems Simulation 
OA 3104 (3-1) Data Analysis 



Quarter 5 

(first six weeks) 

OA 3601 (4-1) Combat Model and 
Games 

AS 361 1 (4-1) Planning and Capitol 
Allocation in the 
Department of Defense 

(last six weeks) 

6XP6RI6NCC TOUR OFF CAMPUS 

Quarter 6 

OA 4604 (4-0) UUargaming Analysis 
OA 4201 (4-0) Nonlinear and Dynamic 

Programming 
OA 4301 (3-2) Stochastic Models II 
OAXXXX elective 



Quarter 7 

PH 3600 (4-0) 

OA 4603 (3-2) 
OA 0810 (0-0) 
OAXXXX 

Quarter 8 

OA 4602 (4-0) 
OA 0810 (0-0) 
OAXXXX 
OAXXXX 



UUeapons Systems and 
Weapons effects 
Test and evaluation 
Thesis Research 
elective 



Campaign Analysis 
Thesis Research 
elective 
elective 



OP€RRTIONRL LOGISTICS 
CURRICULUM 361 



This program provides education in mathe- 
matics, probability and statistics, physical 
science, economics, logistics and computer 
science. These disciplines supply the theoret- 
ical background for analyzing alternative 
choices in planning for sustainability of Naval 
Forces involved in long range deployments. 

The course of study generates computa- 
tional capability and develops skills in identi- 
fying relevant information, generating deci- 
sion criteria, and selecting alternatives. This 
education enhances performance in all duties 
throughout a military career, including opera- 
tional billets, technical management assign- 
ments, and policy making positions. 



OPCRRTIONRL LOGISTICS 
SUBSP€CIRLTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Operations Logistics Subspecial- 
ist with a subspecialty code of XX43P. The 
curriculum sponsor is OP-04, Office of Chief 
of Naval Operations (Logistics). 
Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

AGOS, SACLANT 

LOG. PLANS, CINCUSNAVeUR 

LOG. PLANS, CINCPACFLT 

OPNAV Fleet Mobilization 

JCS Logistics 

UUarfare Analyst, NSURFUUPC 

OSD Analyst 

USCINPAC Analyst 

Head Special Studies, Strategic 
Systems Project Officer 

VX-1 Analyst 

UUar College Professor 



86 



OP6RATIONS flNRLVSIS 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree with above aver- 
age grades in mathematics is required. Com- 
pletion of mathematics through single vari- 
able differential and integral calculus is con- 
sidered minimal preparation, fl one year 
course in college physics is highly desired. 
Students lacking these quantative prerequi- 
sites will be accepted, in certain cases, where 
their under-graduate records indicate that 
they are exceptional students and there are 
other possible indicators of success such as 
Graduate Record examination scores, corres- 
pondence or extension courses in quantita- 
tive subjects, and outstanding motivation for 
the program. 



€ntru Dotes: Operational Logistics is on 
eight quarter course of study with a single 
entry date in October. If further information 
is needed, contact the Academic Associate 
for this curriculum. 

Academic Associate: 

F. Russell Richards, Associate Professor, 
Code 55Rh, Root Hall, Room 271, 
(408) 646-2543, RV 878-2543. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Operations Research are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of the curricular program. 



TVPICRL COURS6 OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

OR 2200 (4-1 ) Computational Methods 
for Operations Research 
MA 1116 (5-0) Multivariate Calculus 
MA 2042 (4-0) Linear Algebra 
OA 3101 (4-1) Probability 

Quarter 2 

OA 2600 (4-0) Introduction to Operations 

Analysis 
MA 31 10 (4-0) Topics in Intermediate 

Analysis 
MN 3372 (4-0) Material Logistics 
OA 3102 (4-1 ) Probability and Statistics 

Quarter 3 

OA 3201 (4-0) Linear Programming 
OA 3700 (4-0) Mobilization 
OA 3301 (4-0) Stochastic Models I 
OA 3103 (4-1) Statistics 

Quarter 4 

OA 4202 (4-0) Network Flows and 

Graphs 
AS 3610(4-0) economic Analysis and 

Operations Research 
OA 3302 (4-0) Systems Simulation 
OA 3104 (3-1 ) Data Analysis 



Quarter 5 

(first six weeks) 

OA 3601 (4-1 ) Combat Model and 
Games 

AS 3611 (4-1) Planning and Capital 
Allocation in the 
Department of Defense 

(last six weeks) 

6XP6RI6NC6 TOUR OFF CRMPUS 

Quarter 6 

OR 4604 (4-0) UUargaming Analysis 
OA 4201 (4-0) Nonlinear and Dynamic 

Programming 
OA 4610 (4-0) Logistics in UUarfare 

Support 
OAXXXX elective 

Quarter 7 

MN 4373 (4-0) Transportation Mgmt 
MN 4310 (4-0) Integrated Logistic 

Support 
OA 0810 (0-0) Thesis Research 
OAXXXX elective 

Quarter 8 

OA 4602 (4-0) Campaign Analysis 
OA 0810 (0-0) Thesis Research 
OAXXXX elective 

OAXXXX elective 



87 



W€APONS eNGIN€€RING 



WEAPONS €NGIN€€RING PROGRAMS 



Curriculor Officer 

Milo J. Kilmer, II, CDR, USN, 

Code 33, Spanagel Hall, Room 328, 

(408) 646-21 16/7, RV 878-21 16/7, 



W€RPON SVSTCMS €NGIN€€RING 
CURRICULUM 530 

This program is designed to meet the 
needs of the military services for an officer 
having a strong broad-based technical ed- 
ucation with particular applications toward 
weapons systems. The fundamental task of 
the UUeapons 6ngineering subspecialty com- 
munity is the design, development, test and 
evaluation, acquisition, operation and sup- 
port of naval weapon systems. In support of 
this career pattern, the objective of these 
curricula is to provide that advanced technical 
education on a broad foundation encompass- 
ing the basic scientific, analytic and engineer- 
ing principles underlying the field of naval 
weaponry. The specific areas of study and 
the levels of expertise to be attained are for- 
mulated to insure a sound basis for technical 
competence and for subsequent growth as 
may be required to support the fundamental 
task of the community. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree with mathematics 
through differential and integral calculus and 
a calculus-based basic physics sequence are 
required for direct input. Courses in the physi- 
cal sciences and engineering are highly desir- 
able. Officers not having the required qualifi- 
cations for direct input enter the program 
indirectly through the Engineering Science 
Curriculum discussed elsewhere in this cat- 
alog. Rn RPC of 323 is required. 



W€RPONS SVST€MS €NGIN€€RING 
SUBSPCCIRITV 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an UUeapons Systems engineering 
Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 
XX61. The Curriculum Sponsor is Naval Sea 
Systems Command Headquarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

NTDS-CIC 

FLTCOMSDSSR, San Diego, Ca. 
ULIarfare Systems Officer 

SPRUURR OPSUPFLD 6 
UUeapons Instructor 

Naval Rcademy, Rnnapolis, Md. 
Staff Readiness (UUeapons) 

COMCRUD6SGRU 1,2,3,5,8,12 

€ntry Dotes: UUeapons Engineering is a nine 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
March and October. If further information is 
needed, contact the Rcademic Rssociate for 
this curriculum. 

Academic Associate: 

James V. Sanders, Rssociate Professor 
Code 61 Sd, Spanagel Hall, Room 1466, 
(408) 646-2931, RV 878-2931. 

Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Engineering Science are 
met as a milestone en route to satisfying the 
skill requirements of the curriculor program. 
On a case by case basis, some students, de- 
pending on background may earn a Master 
of Science in Physics or one of the engineer- 
ing disciplines. 



88 



WEAPONS ENGINEERING 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 


Quarter 5 


MA 1116 (5-0) Multivariate Calculus 


PH 3360(4-1) Electromagnetic Wave 


MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra and Vector 


Propagation 


Analysis 


PH 3161 (4-1) Fluid Dynamics 


EC 2170(4-2) Introduction to Electrical 


CS 3201 (3-2) Computer Architecture 


Engineering 




PH 1 121 (3-2) Basic Physics 1: Mechanics 


Quarter 6 


Quarter 2 


Specialization Course 




MS 3201 (3-2) Materials Science 


MA 2121 (4-0) Differential Equations 


EC 3670 (4-2) Principles of Radar 


CS 2450 (3-1) Fortran 


Systems 


EC 2810(3-2) Digital Machines 


CS 3550 (3-2) Computers in Combat 


PH 1 322 (4-0) Physics II: Electricity and 


Systems 


Magnetism 


Quarter 7 


Quarter 3 






Specialization Course 


PH 2151 (4-1) Mechanics 1: Particle 


PH 3461 (4-1) Explosions Si Explosives 


Mechanics 


OS 3104 (4-0) Statistics for Science and 


EC 2420 (3-0) Linear Systems 


Engineering 


MA 3132 (4-0) Partial Differential 


XX 0810 Thesis 


Equations and Integral 
Transforms 


Quarter 8 


PH 2223 (4-2) Physics III: Optics 


Specialization Course 


Quarter 4 


MS 3202 (3-2) Failure Analysis and 
Prevention 


EC 2410 (3-0) Fourier Analysis Signals 


XX 0810 


and Systems 


Quarter 9 


EC 2300 (3-2) Control Systems 




PH 2681 (4-2) Introductory Quantum 


Specialization Course 


Physics 


AE 4712(3-2) Missile Systems Design 


PH 2724 (4-0) Physics IV: 


and Integration 


Thermodynamics, Fluids 


XX 0810 Thesis 


& Acoustics 


XX 0810 Thesis 



89 



WEAPONS 6NGIN66RING 



W€flPON SYSTCMS SCI€NC€ 
CURRICULUM 531 

This program is designed to meet the 
needs of the military services for officers who 
have a strong broad-based technical educa- 
tion with graduate emphasis in engineering 
physics and its applications. 

In addition to the introductory and core 
courses previously described, all students in 
this curriculum take additional courses in elec- 
tromagnetic phenomena and statistical phys- 
ics. In-depth option sequences of two or more 
courses are offered wherein students special- 
ize in a particular area of physics. Students 
also engage in thesis research in an area 
related to these advanced studies. 



fl€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 

A baccalaureate degree with mathematics 
through differential and integral calculus and 
a calculus-based basic physics sequence are 
required for direct input. Courses in the physi- 
cal sciences and engineering are highly de- 
sirable. Officers not having the required qual- 
ifications for direct input enter the program 
indirectly through the Engineering Science 
curriculum. 

Officers may enhance their selectability by 
taking off-campus courses, including partici- 
pation in the Postgraduate School Continuing 
education program. An APC of 323 is required. 



W€flPONS SVSTCMS SCI€NC€ 
SUBSPCCIRLTV 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a UUeapons Systems Science Sub- 
Specialist with a subspecialty codeofXX63. 
The Curriculum Sponsor is Naval Sea Systems 
Command Headquarters. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

UUeapons Department Head 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 
Research Associate 

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (6) 
Physics Instructor 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 
Research Associate 

Los Alamos National Laboratory 
Clectro-Optics Project Officer 

Naval Ocean Systems Center, San 
Diego, Ca. 
Testing Officer 

COMOPTCVFOR 
Research Officer 

Naval Research Laboratory 
Project Management 

Naval Sea Systems Command (4) 
€ntry Dotes: UUeapon Systems Science is a 
nine quarter course of study with entry dates 
in March and October. If further information 
is needed, contact the Academic Associate 
for this curriculum. 
Academic Associate: 

James V. Sanders, Associate Professor, 
Code 61 Sd, Spanagel Hall, Room 1466, 
(408) 646-2931, AV 878-2931. 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Physics are met as a 
milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter 1 

MA 1116 (5-0) Multivariate Calculus 
MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra and Vector 

Analysis 
6C 2170(4-2) Introduction to electrical 

engineering 
PH 1 121 (4-2) Physics I: Mechanics 



Quarter 2 

MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
PH 2911 (3-2) Computational Physics 
eC 2810(3-2) Digital Machines 
PH 1322(4-0) Physics II: electricity and 
Magnetism 



90 



W6RPONS €NGIN€€RING 



Quarter 3 


PH 


2151 (4-1) Mechanics 1: Particle 




Mechanics 


6C 


2420 (3-0)Linear Systems 


PH 


3990 (4-0) Methods of Theoretical 




Physics 


PH 


2223 (4-2) Physics II: Optics 


Quarter 4 


PH 


3152 (4-1) Mechanics II: extended 




Systems 


PH 


2351 (4-1) eiectromagnetism 


PH 


2681 (4-2) Introductory Quantum 




Physics 


PH 


2724 (4-0) Physics IV: 




Thermodynamics, Fluids 




& Rcoustics 


Quarter 5 



PH 3782 (4-0) Thermodynamics & 
Statistical Physics 

PH 3352 (4-0) electromagnetic Waves 

PH 3683 (4-2) Intermediate Quantum 
Physics 

CS 3201 (3-2) Introduction to Computer 
Architecture 

Quarter 6 

PH XXXX Specialization Course 

6C 3670 (4-0) Principles of Radar 

Systems 
6C 2300 (3-2) Control Systems 
CS 3550 (3-2) Computers in Combat 

Systems 



Quarter 7 

PH XXXX Specialization Course 

PH 4353 (4-0) Topics in Advanced 

electricity and Magnetism 
PH 3161 (4-1) Fluid Dynamics 
PH 0810 Thesis 

Quarter 8 

PH XXXX Specialization Course 

PH 3461 (4-1) explosions & explosives 
PH 4984 (4-0) Rdvanced Quantum 

Physics 
PH 0810 Thesis 



Quarter 9 




PH 


XXX 


Specialization Course 


MS 3201 (3-2) Materials Science and 






engineering 


PH 


0810 


Thesis 


PH 


0810 


Thesis 



NUClCflR PHVSICS 

(WCflPONS & €FF€CTS) 

CURRICULUM 532 



This program is designed to meet the 
needs of the naval service for officers who 
have a broad technical education wtih a grad- 
uate specialization in the physics of nuclear 
weapons and weapons effects. The graduate 
specialization sequence consists of a series 
of courses in the area of nuclear physics, 
effects of nuclear explosions, hardening tech- 
nologies and nuclear warfare analysis. Stu- 
dents can also take elective courses in this or 
related areas and are expected to engage 
in thesis research in their field of specializa- 
tion. 



R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR €NTRV 



R baccalaureate degree with mathematics 
through differential and integral calculus and 
a calculus-based basic physics sequence are 
required for direct input. Courses in the physi- 
cal sciences and engineering are highly 
desirable. Officers not having the required 
qualifications for direct input enter the pro- 
gram indirectly through the engineering Sci- 
ence Curriculum discussed elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

Officers may enhance their selectability by 
taking off-campus courses, including partici- 
pation in the Postgraduate School Continuing 
education program which has been outlined 
earlier in the catalog. Rn RPC of 323 is 
required. 



91 



WEAPONS €NGIN€€RING 



NUCICRR PHVSICS 
SUBSP€ClfllTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as a Nuclear Physics (Weapons & 
Effects Subspecialist with a subspecialty 
code of XX67. The Curriculum Sponsor is 
OP-981N, Headquarters, Nuclear Branch. 



Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Test Manager 

Defense Nuclear Agency (DNfl) 
Research & Development Coordinator 

Defense Nuclear Agency (DNR) 
Physicist 

Defense Nuclear Rgency (DNR) 
Tactical Nuclear Weapons/ Plans 

CINCLRNT (2) 
Test Officer/Programs Officer 

DNR, Dirkland RFB (2) 
Navy Research Officer 

Los Rlamos National Laboratory (3) 
Navy Research Officer 

Laturence Livermore Laboratory 
Nuclear effects Officer/Nucleonics Officer 

SPRWRRSVSCOM (2) 
Nuclear Physicist 

DNR, Los Rlamos 
Instructor 

Nuclear Weapons Training Group, 

Rtlantic 



€ntru Dates: Nuclear Physics is a nine quar- 
ter course of study with entry dates in March 
and October. If further information is needed, 
contact the Rcademic Rssociate for this cur- 
riculum. 



Rcademk Rssociate: 

James V. Sanders, Rssociate Professor, 
Code 61 Sd, Spanagel Hall, Room 1468, 
(408) 646-2931, RV 878-2931 



Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in Physics are met as a 
milestone en route to satisfying the skill re- 
quirements of the curricular program. 



TVPICRL COURSC OF STUDY 

Quarter I 

MR 1116 (5-0) Multivariate Calculus 
MR 2047 (4-0) Linear Rlgebra & Vector 

Rnalysis 
CC 2170 (4-2) Introduction to electrical 

Engineering 
PH 1121 (4-2) Physics I: Mechanics 

Quarter 2 

MR 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 
PH 291 1 (3-2) Computational Physics 
6C 2420 (3-0) Linear Systems 
PH 1322(4-0) Physics II: electricity & 
Magnetism 

Quarter 3 

PH 2151 (4-1) Mechanics I: Particle 

Mechanics 
eC 2300 (3-2) Control Systems 
PH 3990 (4-0) Methods of Theoretical 

Physics 
PH 2223 (4-2) Physics III: Optics 

Quarter 4 

PH 3152(4-1) Mechanics II: extended 

Systems 
PH 2351 (4-1) eiectromagnetism 
PH 2681 (4-2) Introductory Quantum 

Physics 
PH 2724 (4-0) Physics IV: Thermo- 

Dynamics, Fluids & 

Rcoustics 



Quarter 5 

PH 3161 (4-1) Fluid Dynamics 

PH 3352 (4-0) electromagnetic Waves 

PH 3782 (4-0) Thermo Dynamics & 

Statistical Physics 
PH 3911 (3-1) Simulation of Physical 

Systems 

Quarter 6 

PH 3855 (4-2) Nuclear Physics 

PH 4751 (3-1) Semiconductor Physics 

(last six weeks) 

expeRieNce tour 



92 



WEAPONS €NGIN€<ERING 



Quarter 7 

PH 4856(4-1) Physics of Nuclear 

6xplosions 
PH 4353 (4-0) Topics in Advanced 

electricity and Magnetism 
PH 3683 (4-2) Intermediate Quantum 

Physics 
PH 0810 Thesis 

Quarter 8 

PH 4857 (4-0) Nuclear UUeapons effects 

& Hardening 

Technologies 
PH 3461 (4-1) Explosions & explosives 
PH 4984 (4-0) Advanced Quantum 

Physics 
PH 0810 Thesis 

Quarter 9 

Se 4858 (4-0) Nuclear UUarfare Analysis 
MS 3201 (3-2) Materials Science 6t 

engineering 
PH 0810 Thesis 

PH 0810 Thesis 



UNDCRWATCR ACOUSTIC SYSTCMS 
CURRICULUM 535 

Underuuater Acoustic Systems is an inter- 
disciplinary program. Courses are drawn prin- 
cipally from the fields of physics, electrical 
engineering, computer science and mathe- 
matics. Although broadly based, the empha- 
sis is on underuuater acoustics and signal pro- 
cessing applications to undersea warfare. As 
can be seen in the following list, courses in- 
cluded relate to the generation and propaga- 
tion of sound in the ocean, military applica- 
tions of underwater sound and the electrical 
engineering and computer science aspects of 
signal processing in sonar systems. Also in- 
cluded are topics concerning the effects of 
the noise environment on people. 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR CNTRV 

A baccalaureate degree with mathematics 
through differential and integral calculus and 
a calculus-based basic physics sequence are 
required for direct input. Courses in the physi- 
cal sciences and engineering are highly de- 
sirable. Officers not having the required quali- 
fications for direct input enter the program in- 
directly through the engineering Science Cur- 
riculum discussed elsewhere in this catalog. 



Officers may enhance their selectability by 
taking off-campus courses, including partici- 
pation in the Postgraduate School Continuing 
education program which has been outlined 
earlier in the catalog. An APC of 323 is re- 
quired. 

UND€RWAT€R ACOUSTICS 

SUBSPECIALTY 

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an 
officer as an Underwater Acoustics Subspe- 
cialist with a subspecialty code of XX56. The 
Curriculum Sponsor is Naval Sea Systems 
Command/Commander Space and Naval 
UUarfare Systems Command. 

Typical Jobs in this Subspecialty: 

Physics Instructor 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 
OP-981H 

OPNAV 
Instructor 

Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, 

CA 
Training Officer 

PDUU-124 (Undersea Surveillance) 
Staff 

Commander 7th fleet 
Staff 

COMNAVSURRANT 
Test & evaluation Officer 

OPTCVFOR 
Strategic Systems Project Officer 

Director of SSPO 
Staff Anti-Submarine UUarfare 

NAVSCASVSCOM 
Research & Development Project Officer 

Office of Secretary of Defense 

Entry Dates: Underwater Acoustics is a nine 
quarter course of study with entry dates in 
March and October. If further information is 
needed, contact the Academic Associate for 
this curriculum. 

Academic Associate: 

James V. Sanders, Associate Professor, 
Code 61 Sd, Spanagel Hall, Room 1468, 
(408) 646-2931, AV 878-2931. 
Degree: Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in engineering Acoustics 
are met as a milestone en route to satisfying 
the skill requirements of the curricular pro- 
gram. 



93 



UUeflPONS 6NGIN66RING 



TYPICAL COURS€ OF STUDY 



Quarter I 

PH 1121 (4-2) Physics I: Mechanics 
MA 1116 (5-0) Multivariate Calculus 
MA 2047 (4-0) Linear Algebra Si Vector 

Analysis 
6C 2107(4-2) Introduction to €lectrical 

engineering 



Quarter 2 

PH 21 19 (4-1 ) Oscillation & Waves 

MA 2121 (4-0) Differential equations 

€C 2200 (3-3) electronics engineering I 

eC 2810(3-2) Digital Machines 



Quarter 3 

PH 3451 (4-2) Fundamental Acoustics 
PH 3990 (4-0) Methods of Theoretical 

Physics" 
eC 2210 (3-2) electronics engineering II 
eC 2410(3-0) Fourier Analysis of Signals 

& Systems 



Quarter 4 

PH 3452(4-1) Underuuater Acoustics 
OS 2102 (4-1) Introduction to Applied 

Probability for electrical 

engineering 
eC 2400 (3-0) Discrete Systems 
eC 2500 (3-2) Communications Theory 



Quarter 5 

PH 3458 (4-0) 

eC 3400 (3-0) 
eC 3500 (4-0) 
CS 2970 (5-0) 

Quarter 6 

PH 4410 (0-6) 

CS 3300 (3-1) 
CS 3111 (4-0) 
eC 4570 (4-0) 

Quarter 7 

PH 4453 (4-0) 

OC 3261 (4-0) 
Thesis 

Quarter 8 

PH 4454 (3-2) 

eC 4450 (4-1) 
Thesis 

Quarter 9 

CS 3460 (3-1) 
PH 3166 (4-2) 

Thesis 



Noise, Shock & Vibration 

Control 

Introduction to Digital 

Signal Processing 

Analysis of Random 

Signals 

Structured Programming 

with PASCAL 



Advanced Acoustics 
Laboratory 
Data Structures 
Principles of Programming 
Decision & estimation 
Theory 



Sound Propagation in the 

Ocean 

Oceanic Factors in 

Underuuater Sound 



Transducer Theory & 

Design 

Sonar Systems 

engineering 



Software Methodology 
Physics of Underwater 
Vehicles 



94 



CURRICUIR CONDUCTED RT OTHER UNIVERSITIES 



CURRICULA CONDUCTED RT OTH€R UNIV€RSITI€S 

ROB€RT C. SIV€RUNG, Commander, U.S. Navy; Manager Civilian Institutions Program; A.B., frank- 
lin and Marshall College, 1966; M.S. in Management, Naval Postgraduate School, 1983. 
The Navy's fully-funded graduate education program supports 71 subspecialties. This involves 
73 curricula, 40 at NPS and 33 at over 45 civilian institutions. Programs available at NPS are not 
offered at civilian institutions. Approximately 20% of the fiscal year officer graduate education 
assignments are slated for these universities. Where more than one school is listed for a particular 
curriculum, subspecialty education placement officers plan quota distribution. 

In order to qualify for the Civilian Institutions Program, officers must be PG School selected and 
must meet all the requirements of an officer entering Naval Postgraduate School. 

Curriculum Number lenqth Institution Primary Consultant 

Chemistry 382 2 yrs. Various NAVSEASVSCOM 

Criminal law 884 1 yr. Various NJflG 

€ducation and Training 867 12-18 mos Various CNET 

Management 

Environmental law 880 1 yr. Various NJflG 

Facilities engineering 47X 1-2 yrs. Various NAVFACENGCOM 

Forensic Science and law 885 1 yr. George Washington Univ NJflG 

International law 887 1 yr. Various NJflG 

Joint Intelligence 990 9-12 mos. Defense Intell. Sen.* NAV1NTCOM 

labor law 886 1 yr. Various NJflG 

Advanced Military Justice 881 9-12 mos. JAG School NJAG 

logistics Management 700 1 5 mos. Air Force Inst, of 

Technology* NAVAIRSVSCOM 

Naval Const. & Cngrg. 51 2-3 yrs. M.I.T NAVSEASVSCOM 

Nuclear Physics 521 18 mos. Air Force Inst, of CNO-OP98IN 

(Weapons & Effects) Technology* 

Nuclear Engineering (ED) 520 1 8-24 mos. MIT NAVSEASVSCOM 

Ocean Engineering 472 1 -2 yrs. Various NAVFACENGCOM 

Ocean law 883 1 yr. Various NJAG 

Petroleum Management 811 17 mos. U. of Kansas NAVSUPSVSCOM 

Petroleum Engineering 630 1 2-24 mos. Various NAVFACENGCOM 

Public Affairs 920 1 yr. Various CHINFO 

Religion 97X 9 mos. Various CHCHAP 

Retailing 830 1 yr. Various NAVSUPSVSCOM 

Subsistence Technology 860 1 5-21 mos. Michigan St.* NAVSUPSVSCOM 

Supply Aquis/Distrib Mgmt 810 12-18 mos. Various NAVSUPSVSCOM 

Tax law 882 1 yr. Various NJAG 



♦No NROTC Unit at Institution 

Inquiries concerning curricula conducted at other universities should be directed to Manager, 
Civilian Institutions Program, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943. Telephone 
(408) 646-2319 or autovon 878-2319. 

95 




K -" 



&m? 



w» ; 




The faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School performs its graduate education 
functions through eleven academic departments: 



Administrative Sciences 

Aeronautics 

Computer Science 

Electrical & Computer Engineering 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 



Meteorology 

National Security Affairs 

Oceanography 

Operations Research 

Physics 



and four interdisciplinary Academic Groups, each headed by a chairman: 



Antisubmarine UUarfare 

Command, Control Si Communications 



Electronic UUarfare 
Space Systems 



The departmental facilities, degree requirements, and course offerings are 
contained in the individual department descriptions which follouu. 

In support of the courses of study, an active research program is carried on by 
the faculty and students. The research projects are supported by the Office of 
Naval Research, the Director of Naval Laboratories, the various Naval Systems 
Commands, and the National Science Foundation, as well as by other agencies 
and organizations. The ongoing projects cover a broad spectrum of research 
problems and include both theoretical and experimental investigations. 

The faculty maintains a close liaison with the programs of the Department of 
Defense research laboratories and development centers, and the knowledge 
acquired and maintained through this association is incorporated throughout 
the instructional program. 

The undergraduate-level courses included in the departmental offerings are 
taken for remedial study by students, as required, to prepare them for the grad- 
uate-level program. Much of this preparatory subject matter is available for off- 
campus self-study through the School's Continuing Education Program. 

In the course listings that follow, the first two letters in the course designator 
refer to the department in which it is taught. The following table lists the course 
alpha prefix codes by department: 



Administrative Sciences 

Service Courses AS 

Telecommunications Systems Management CM 

Information Systems IS 

97 



ACRDCMIC DCPRRTMCNTS AND COURSC DCSCRIPTIONS 



Management MN 

Aeronautics AC 

Antisubmarine UUarfare ST 

Command, Control And Communications CC 

Computer Science CS 

electrical and Computer engineering CC 

electrical Operations CO 

electronic UUarfare CUU 

Mathematics MA 

Mechanical engineering MC 

Materials Science MS 

Meteorology MR 

National Security Affairs NS 

Oceanography 

Oceanographic Sciences OC 

Hydrographic Sciences GH 

Operations Research 

Operations Analysis OA 

Service Courses OS 

Physics PH 

Chemistry CH 

Science And engineering SC 

Space Systems SS 

The courses are assigned course numbers in accordance with their levels of 
academic credit as follows: 

0001-0999 No credit 
1000-1999 lower division credit 
2000-2999 Upper division credit 
3000-3999 Upper division or graduate credit 
4000-4999 Graduate credit 

The two numbers in parenthesis (separated by a hyphen) following the 
course title indicate the hours of instruction per week in classroom and labora- 
tory respectively. Laboratory hours are assigned half the value shown in calcu- 
lating quarter hours for the credit value of the course. Thus a (3-2) course (hav- 
ing three hours recitation and two hours laboratory) will be assigned credit 
value of 4 quarter hours. 



98 



ADMINISTRflTIV€ SCI6NC6S 



D€PfiRTM€NT OF 
ADMINISTRATIVE SCI€NC€S 



Choirmon: 

UUillis R. Greer, Jr., Professor, 
Code 54, Ingersoll Holl, Room 230, 
(408) 646-2161, RV 878-2161. 

Associate Chairmen: 

Instruction: 

Jomes M. Fremgen, Professor, 

Code 54Fm, Ingersoll Holl, Room 301 

(408) 646-2644, flV 878-2644. 

Research: 

Shu S. Lioo, Professor, 

Code 54Lc, Ingersoll Hall, Room 302, 

(408) 646-2505, RV 878-2505. 

Sponsored Research: 

Norman F. Schneideiuind, Professor, 
Code 54Ss, Ingersoll Hall, Room 31 1, 
(408) 646-2719, RV 878-2719. 



The Department of Rdministrative Sciences 
has primary responsibility for three academic 
programs and awards three graduate de- 
grees. The largest program is a group of cur- 
ricula in Rdministrative Science. These curric- 
ula include Requisition and Contract Manage- 
ment, Financial Management, Manpower/ 
Personnel Training Rnalysis, Material Logis- 
tics Support, Systems Inventory Manage- 
ment, and Transportation Management. 
Graduates of these curricula are awarded the 
degree Master of Science in Management. 
Next largest is the Computer Systems Man- 
agement Curriculum, whose graduates re- 
ceive the Master of Science in Information 
Systems. Finally, the Telecommunications 
Systems Management Curriculum leads to the 
degree Master of Science in Telecommunica- 
tions Systems Management. 

The Department has two microcomputer 
laboratories for instructional and research 
purposes. One contains several types of per- 
sonal computers which are used for instruc- 
tion in programming, computer networks, and 
data base management. Several of these 



computers are linked with the School's main- 
frame computer and with the Defense Data 
Network, as well as being linked together in a 
local network. The other laboratory consists 
of a network of five microcomputers. It repli- 
cates a system used in various Coast Guard 
installations and is used largely by Coast 
Guard students. 

The Rdministrative Science curricula have 
been reviewed by the National Rssociation of 
Schools of Public Rffairs and Rdministration 
and have been found to be in substantial con- 
formity with its standards for graduate pro- 
grams in public administration. 



MflSTCR OF SCI€NC€ 
IN INFORMATION SVSTCMS 

R candidate for the degree of Master of 
Science in Information Systems must success- 
fully complete or validate core courses in 
each of the following disciplines: 

Recounting and financial management 

Organizational sciences 

Information systems 

Computer Science 

economics 

Management theory and practice 

Quantitative methods 

In addition, each candidate's curriculum 
must include the successful completion of 48 
quarter hours of graduate-level course work 
and an acceptable thesis or project. Rt least 
12 quarter hours of the course work must be 
at the 4000 level. Further, this graduate-level 
course work must include at least 24 quarter 
hours in Rdministrative Sciences and at least 
16 quarter hours in Computer Science. 

The candidate's program must be ap- 
proved by the Chairman of the Department of 
Rdministrative Sciences. 



99 



RDMINISTRRTIV6 SCI6NC6S 



MnST€fl OF SCI€NC€ 
IN MANRG€M€NT 

The degree Master of Science in Manage- 
ment requires: 

a. Completion or validation of the Man- 
agement Fundamentals program, which con- 
sists of a total of 32 quarter hours of 2000 
and 3000 level courses, including a minimum 
of the following hours by disciplines: 

Accounting and financial management 6 
economics 6 

Organization and management 6 

Quantitative methods 8 

b. In addition to the above, completion of 
a minimum of 48 hours of graduate-level 
courses, at least 1 2 hours of which are at the 
4000 level. 

c. The completion of an approved se- 
quence of courses in the student's area of 
concentration. 

d. The submission of an acceptable thesis 
on a topic previously approved by the De- 
partment of Administrative Sciences. 

e. Final approval of a program from the 
Chairman, Department of Administrative 
Sciences. 

MnST€R OF SCI€NC€ 

IN T€l€COMMUNICnTIONS SVSTCMS 

MflNflG€M€NT 

The degree of Master of Science in Tele- 
communications Systems Management will 
be awarded at the completion of an inter- 
disciplinary program that satisfies the follow- 
ing requirements: 

a. A minimum of 56 quarter hours of grad- 
uate-level work, of which at least 1 2 quarter 
hours must represent courses at the 4000 
level. 

b. The program must consist of a minimum 
of graduate-level credit as follows: 

Administrative sciences and 

quantitative methods 40 

Communications systems and 

computer science 1 6 

c. In addition to the 56 quarter hours of 
graduate-level course credit, an acceptable 
thesis must be completed. 6ach thesis shall 
have an advisor and a second reader, at least 
one of whom must be from the Department of 
Administrative Sciences. 

d. The program must be approved by the 
Chairman of the Department of Administrative 
Sciences. 



D€PftRTM€NTRL COURS€ 
OFFERINGS 

RS 1501 €nglish languogc Skills (0-4). 
A course in basic Cnglish to increase speaking and 
uuriting skills and to increase comprehension. A pre 
and post conversation test is administered to each 
student. Open only to Allied Officers. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

RS 3610 economic Analysis and Operations 
Research (4-0). 

A presentation of basic economic concepts in- 
volved in the decision processes of individuals and 
groups foced with scarcity of resources. Topics 
covered include consumer theory and demand, 
individual behavior under uncertainty, producer 
theory and supply, firm behavior under uncertainty, 
output and input market structures, partial ond 
general equilibrium analysis, and market imperfec- 
tions and welfare analysis. PA6A6QUISIT6S: MA 
2042, MA 2110 (concurrently), and OA 3201 (con- 
currently). 



RS 3611 Planning and Capital Allocation in the 
Department of Defense (4-1). 
extension of concepts discussed in AS 361 to al- 
location of resources over time. Covered are mod- 
els of consumption and production over time, op- 
timal investment decision rules and investment 
under uncertainty.- Models of welfare economics 
and cost-benefit analysis are presented. Also 
covered are planning and decentralization tech- 
niques using decomposition algorithms. Cost effec- 
tiveness and costing models from current practices 
in DOD are examined. Institutional procedures and 
processes such as PPBS, budget enactment and 
apportionment, FVDP, systems acquisition/DSAAC 
and ZBS are also discussed. PACACQUISIT6S: AS 
3610 and OA 3103. 



Graduate Courses 

RS 4601 Decision Making in Command (4-0). 
This course will focus on the processes and mech- 
anisms of decision making in military organizations, 
especially in the context of war. After a review of 
concepts, theories, and models relevant to deci- 
sion making in organizations, the course will ana- 
lyze the nature of and constraints on command and 
control in military organizations. Also, a comparison 
will be made of the consequences of different or- 
ganization structures on decision making ond im- 
plementation. Topics covered will include strategy, 
implementation, technology, organization design, 
and conflict resolution. PA6ACQUISIT6S: CM 3111 
and OS 3636 (or equivalent). 



100 



RDMINISTRRTIV6 SCI6NC6S 



AS 4613 Theory of Systems Analysis (4-0). 
Systems analysis (cost-effectiveness analysis) 
formulated as commensurable and incommensur- 
able physical capital investment choice models. 
Cmphasis on decision rules and the nature of op- 
portunity costs with respect to scale and timing of 
investment. Interpretation of methods of risk, mod- 
eling, and solution computation. Theory of the sec- 
ond best; theory of the social discount rate. Intro- 
duction to models of planning and control emphasi- 
zing decentralization of the decision-making prob- 
lem. PREREQUISITES: AS 361 1 and OA 4201 (con- 
currently). 



T€L€COMMUNICnTIONS SVST€MS 
MnNflG€M€NT COURS6S 



CM 0001 Seminor for Telecommunication Systems 

Management Students (0-2). 

Guest lectures. Thesis and research presentations. 

CM 0810 Thesis Research for Telecommunications 
Systems Management Students (0-0). 
Every student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

CM 3001 €conomic evaluation of Telecommunica- 
tions Systems I (4-0). 

Study of economic evaluation concepts and meth- 
ods for planning, coordinating, and controlling tele- 
communications systems. Topics include cost per- 
formance (value) analyses, capacity planning, 
pricing of telecommunications services, and make, 
lease, or buy decisions. PREREQUISITE: MN 2155. 

CM 3002 economic evaluation of Telecommunica- 
tions Systems II (4-0). 

Continuation of material in CM 3001. PREREQ- 
UISITE: CM 3001. 

CM 31 1 1 C3 Mission and Organization (4-0). 
A survey of command, control, and communications 
organizations within OSD, JCS, and the Service 
Headquarters. Execution of National Strategic Nuc- 
lear Policy and planning for joint employment of 
general purpose forces are discussed. Service com- 
bat organization and service tactical C3 systems 
are covered. €mphasis is on description of existing 
C3 organizations and systems, with brief historical 
perspective. PRCREQUISITC: SECRET clearance. 

CM 31 1 2 Navy Telecommunications Systems (4-0). 
Description of the Naval Telecommunications Sys- 
tem, with emphasis on the organization and man- 
agement control and operational direction of the 
facilities. Current subsystems are described in de- 
tail. PREREQUISITES: SECRET clearance and CM 
31 1 1 or permission of the Instructor. 



Graduate Courses 

CM 4003 Seminar in Telecommunications Systems 
Management (1-0 to 4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of current interest in 
telecommunications systems, to be determined by 
the instructor. PREREQUISITES: A background in 
telecommunications systems and permission of the 
Instructor. 

CM 4502 Telecommunication Networks (4-0). 
This course covers telecommunications network de- 
sign, development, and managment topics, includ- 
ing service requirements determination, signaling, 
interoperability, switching, synchronization proto- 
cols, demand, and architecture. A variety of applica- 
tions will be presented. PREREQUISITE: IS 3502. 

CM 4925 Telecommunications Systems, Industry, 
and Regulation (4-0). 

Study of the telecommunications industry (domes- 
tic and international) and its regulation by Cong- 
ress, Executive Branch, Federal Communications 
Commission, and International Telecommunications 
Union. Consideration of special issues, including 
allocation of the spectrum, telecommunication ser- 
vice pricing, and DOD lease decisions. PREREQ- 
UISITES: CM 3002 and OS 3005. 

INFORMATION SVST€MS COURS€S 

IS 0001 Seminar for Computer Systems Manage- 
ment Students (0-2). 
Guest lectures. Thesis and research presentations. 

IS 0810 Thesis Research for Computer Systems 
Management Students (0-0). 

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

Upper Division Courses 
IS 2000 Introduction to Computer Management 

(3-0). 

This course will provide an introduction to the field 
of automatic data processing and the functions and 
and responsibilities of the computer manager. 
Specific topics indude a survey of contemporary 
computer applications, hardware and software, 
and introductions to personnel management, finan- 
cial management, quantitative methods, and com- 
puter science in the computer management func- 
tion. 

IS 2100 Information Systems Laboratory (0-2). 
The objective is to develop computer literacy early 
in the Computer Systems Management student's 
program and to reinforce material in IS 2000. Stu- 
dents will perform elementary laboratory assign- 
ments involving use of microcomputer systems and 
digital logic; hardware architecture; machine, as- 
sembly, and high-order language programming; 
and application packages such as database man- 
agement and word processing. PREREQUISITE: IS 
2000. 



101 



RDMINISTRRTIV6 SCIENCES 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

IS 3000 Distributed Computer System (4-0). 
This course covers the technology, application and 
management of distributed computer systems. 
Specific topics include distributed processing, dis- 
tributed data base management, communication 
facilities and protocols, economic and performance 
analysis, and managerial and organizational prob- 
lems. PREREQUISITES: CS 281 0, CS 30 1 or CS 3400, 
and IS 31 70 (may be taken concurrently). 

IS 3100 Survey of Contemporary Computer Sys- 
tems (3-0). 

Study and analysis of contemporary large, mini, 
and micro computer systems, including harduuare, 
applications of softuuare, operating systems, and 
price characteristics. Emphasis is on the study and 
comparison of specific vendor's systems which are 
available in the market and evaluation of their ap- 
plicability to various military requirements. Trends 
in computer technology and pricing structures. PRE- 
REQUISITES: CS 281 0, CS 301 or CS 3400, CS 3030 
or CS 3112, and IS 3170. 

IS 3170 €conomk Evaluation of Information Sys- 
tems I (4-0). 

Study of economic evaluation concepts and meth- 
ods for planning, coordinating, and controlling com- 
puter-based information systems design, imple- 
mentation, and analysis. Topics included are cost 
performance (value) analysis, capacity planning, 
capital budgeting techniques, capital budgeting 
systems, budgeting and pricing for computer ser- 
vices, information resource management, and a 
study of the information industries (computers, 
softuuare, and telecommunications). PREREQUISITE: 
MN 2155. 

IS 3171 Economic Evaluation of Information Sys- 
tems II (4-0). 

Continuation of material in IS 31 70. PREREQUISITE: 
IS 31 70. 

IS 3183 Management Information Systems (4-0). 
Study of what an information system is, how the 
computer and other resources fit into the system, 
and management considerations involved in com- 
puter-based and other information systems. Study 
of computer and MIS concepts. PREREQUISITES: MN 
31 05 and a basic computer course. 

IS 3220 Computer Center Management (3-2). 
Theory and practice of the management of com- 
puter center operations. Specific topics include 
facilities planning, production scheduling and con- 
trol, operational procedures, and computer per- 
formance evaluation. PREREQUISITES: CS 3030 and 
OS 3004. 



IS 3502 Computer Networks: Wide Rrea/Local 
Area (4-0). 

Analysis, evaluation, management and develop- 
ment of wide oreo and local area computer net- 
works and supporting packet switching computer 
communication systems. Specific topics include net- 
work architectures, protocols, functions, standards, 
error detection/correction, cost reduction, inter- 
connection, management, and security. Example 
systems include Defense Data Network, System 
Network Architecture, DECNET, Ethernet, token ring, 
broadband, fiber optics, private automatic branch 
exchanges, and satellite communications systems. 
PREREQUISITES: CS 2810. CS 3010, and OS 3004. 



Graduate Courses 

IS 4182 Information Systems Management (4-0). 
Management of RDP in the Federal government, 
especially in the Department of Defense. Specific 
topics include computer center and computer sys- 
tem development management, procurement of 
computer systems, and installation and effective 
utilization of RDP systems. PREREQUISITE: IS 4200 
(concurrently). 

IS 4183 Applications of Database Management 
Systems (4-0). 

Rpplications-oriented introduction to database 
management systems technology. Survey of cur- 
rent database systems and approaches to data- 
base technology. Technical and administrative con- 
siderations involved in a database implementation 
project are considered. Students will be expected 
to implement on applications systems using a 
database management package. PREREQUISITES: 
CS 3010, CS 3020, and IS 2000. 

IS 4185 Decision Support Systems (4-0). 
The application and design of computer-based in- 
formation systems for management planning, con- 
trol, and operations. PREREQUISITES: IS 2000, MN 
3105, and OS 3101. 

IS 4200 System Analysis and Design(4-0). 

This course covers computer-based system devel- 
opment, including the following concepts, metho- 
dologies, and techniques: information system re- 
quirements analysis, technical and economic feasi- 
bility studies, system costing, functional specifica- 
tions, computer and data communication hardware 
and software trade-off evaluations and specifica- 
tions, conversion, and testing. PREREQUISITES: 
CS 2810, CS 3010, and CS 3020 or CS 2810, CS 
3111, and CS 3400. 



102 



ADMINISTRATE SCI6NC6S 



IS 4300 Software engineering and Management 

(4-0). 

The objective of this course is to educate the stu- 
dent in areas of great concern to the Department of 
Defense in the fields of softuuare engineering and 
management. This will be accomplished by study- 
ing the uuealth of material available in the litera- 
ture and applying what has been learned by using 
the computer to analyze typical software. UUritten 
and oral technical and management reports will be 
made to document the student's findings. PRC-RCQ- 
UISIT6S: CS 3030, IS 3171, and OS 3004. 

IS 4925 Seminar in Information Systems (1-0 to 
4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of current interest in in- 
formation systems, to be determined by the in- 
structor. PR^RCQUISITCS: fl background of informa- 
tion systems and permission of the Instructor. 



MflNf)G€M€NT COURS€S 

MN 0001 Seminar for Administrative Science Stu- 
dents (0-2). 
Guest lectures. Thesis and research presentations. 

MN 0810 Thesis Research for Administrative Sci- 
ence Students (0-0). 

6very student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 



Upper Division Courses 

MN 2031 €conomic Decision Making (4-0). 
The macroeconomic section focuses on methods of 
national income determination, the consumption 
function, the multiplier, and the impact of fiscal and 
monetary policies. The microeconomic section ana- 
lyzes individual economic decisions and their rela- 
tion to attainment of market equilibria. PRC-RC-Q- 
UISIT6: MR 2300 (concurrently). 

MN 2111 Seminar in Manpower, Personnel, and 
Training Issues I (0-2). 

Rn introduction to the institutional and issue focus 
of the military MPT system. Graded on a Pass/Foil 
basis only. 

MN 2112 Seminar in Manpower, Personnel, and 
Training Issues II (0-2). 

€xposure to elementary analysis of problems and 
issues in the contemporary military MPT system. 
Graded on a Pass/fail basis only. 

MN 2113 Seminar in Manpower, Personnel and 
Training Issues III (0-2). 

Presentation and discussion of contemporary is- 
sues and problems associated w ith components of 
the MPT arena. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 



MN 2114 Seminar in Manpower, Personnel, and 
Training Issues IV (0-2). 

F\n in-depth series of analyses of MPT issues and 
problems selected to integrate the skills covered in 
courses in the fourth quarter of the MPTR curriculum 
and to provide suggestions for thesis topics. 
Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 

MN 2150 Financial Accounting (4-0). 
Study of basic accounting concepts and standards. 
Specific topics include the accounting cycle, asset 
valuation, equities and capital structure, earnings 
measurement, cash flow analysis, and financial 
statement analysis. (May be taken through Con- 
tinuing education.) 

MN 2155 Accounting for Management (4-0). 
Brief introduction to financial accounting, with em- 
phasis on the content and analysis of financial 
statements. Specific topics in management ac- 
counting include fundamentals of cost accounting, 
cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, relevant 
costs for decision making, capital budgeting, and 
financial performance measures. (Closed to stu- 
dents in Rdministrative Science curricula.) 

MN 2302 Seminar for Acquisition and Contracting 
Students (0-3). 

Guest lectures. Thesis and research presentations. 
Certified Professional Contracts Management cer- 
tificate examinations. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis 
only. 

MN 2901 MPT Computer Skills Development (0-2). 
Rn introduction to the use and operation of both 
the NPS mainframe computer system and micro- 
computers, with emphasis on the relationship to 
the requirements of the MPTR curriculum. Exposure 
to pertinent software packages and data files. 
Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

MN 3101 Personnel Management (4-0). 
Study of the principles and practices of personnel 
administration in business and government organ- 
izations. R survey of the history, development, and 
current status of labor-management relations in 
industry and government. Analysis of the labor 
market and the implications of government regula- 
tions for wages and labor-management bargain- 
ing. PR6R6QUISIT6: MN 3105. 

MN 3105 Organization and Management (4-0). 
Study of managing organizations in a dynamic en- 
vironment. Cmphasis is on managerial decision 
making, planning and control, organizational struc- 
ture and planned organizational change, and their 
systemic impacts on organizational effectiveness 
and adaptation. 



103 



flDMiNisTRirnve sciesices 



MN 311 1 Personnel Management Processes (4-0). 
R broad coverage of human behavior in the work 
situation, with special emphasis on the problem of 
work in the Naval environment. Topical areas cov- 
ered include selection, placement, training, and 
evaluation of personnel; motivation, remuneration, 
morale, supervision, and working conditions in 
organizations; equipment design and man-machine 
relationships; and consumer (user) behavior and 
the impact of technological programs. PR6RCQ- 
UISIT€S: MN 3105 and OS 3106 (concurrently). 

MN 3123 Military Sociology (4-0). 
Rn exploration of classical theories of sociology 
pertaining to civilian-military relations with modern 
applications to command and control problems. 
Sexism, racism, family dissolution, unionization, 
bureaucratic inertia, career patterns, and profes- 
sionalism are considered from the perspective of 
sociology. Pfl€R€QUISIT€: MN 3105. 

MN 3140 Microeconomic Theory (4-0). 
Determination of the allocation of resources and 
the composition of output. Consumer and producer 
choice theory. Partial and general equilibrium ana- 
lysis. UUelfare economics. Rpplications to defense 
problems ore emphasized. PRC-R6QUISITC-S: MR 
2300 and MN 2031. 

MN 3161 Managerial Recounting (4-0). 

Introduction to cost accounting, including job order 
systems, overhead costing, variable and absorp- 
tion costing, and standard costs. 6mphasis is on 
applications of accounting data to planning, con- 
trol, and decision making. Topics covered include 
budgeting, flexible budgets, variance analysis, per- 
formance measures, cost-volume-profit analysis, 
cost analysis for decision making, and capital bud- 
geting. PR6RCQUISITC-: MN 2150 (May be taken 
through Continuing Education.) 

MN 3172 Public Policy Processes (4-0). 
R presentation of means by which resources are 
allocated to the production of goods in the de- 
fense sector. Defense budget preparation. Presi- 
dential policy making and management and Con- 
gressional budget action are considered and are 
set within the theory of public goods. PRCR6Q- 
UISIT6: MN 3140. 

MN 3301 Systems Acquisition and Project Manage- 
ment (4-0). 

This course provides the student with an under* 
standing of the underlying philosophies and con- 
cepts of the systems acquisition process and the 
practical application of project management meth- 
ods within this process. Topics include the evolution 
and current state of systems acquisition manage- 
ment; the defense systems acquisition cycle; user- 
producer acquisition management disciplines and 
activities; and project planning, organization, staf- 
fing, directing, and controlling. 



MN 3303 Principles of Requisition and Contracting 

(4-0). 

Introduction to the principles of acquisition and con- 
tracting. This course studies the fundamentals of 
the Federal Requisition Regulation and the DOD 
Supplement; the acquisition and contracting pro- 
cesses, including requirements determination, 
acquisition strategies, basic contract law, ethics, 
and contracting methods; and acquisition/contract 
management techniques. PRCR6QUISIT6: MN 31 05. 



MN 3304 Contract Pridng and Negotiations (4-0). 
This course involves the study of pricing theory and 
strategies, cost methods, cost and price analysis, 
cost principles, Cost Recounting Standards, and 
contract negotiations. Students develop and 
sharpen negotiating skills by particpating in practi- 
cal negotiation exercises. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: MN 
3140, MN 3303, and OS 3105. 



MN 3305 Contract Administration (4-0). 
This course stresses the management skills and 
techniques necessary for the successful administra- 
tion of government prime contracts and subcon- 
tracts. Topics include managing contract progress 
and performance, change control, quality control, 
cost/financial control, property, terminations, and 
regulatory and policy concerns. PRC-R6QUISITC-: MN 
3304. 



MN 3307 RDP Requisition (4-0). 
Introduction to the management principles, con- 
cepts, and issues involved in Federal government 
acquisition of RDP requirements. The course fo- 
cuses on the concepts of system acquisition and 
project management, as they pertain to RDP acqui- 
sition and specific purchases of computer hardware 
and software, and on administrative issues through 
the use of case studies. PR6R6QUISIT6: enrollment 
in Computer Systems Management curriculum or 
permission of the Instructor. 



MN 3308 Introduction to Systems engineering 

(4-0). 

This course provides the student with on intro- 
duction to system design and development; the 
underlying philosophy, concepts, and methodol- 
ogy of systems engineering; and its applications in 
the Department of Defense and in the Navy. Topics 
covered include an overview of systems engineer- 
ing, the system life cycle and system design pro- 
cess, decision analysis, and the systems engineer- 
ing disciplines. Cmphasis is placed on the planning 
and design phases of the system life cycle. PRC-- 
RC-QUISIT6: R course in statistics. 



104 



flDMINISTRRTIVe SCI€NC€S 



MN 331 1 Requisition Management Simulation 

(0-4). 

This course is o system life cycle, computer-based 
simulation, interactive laboratory exercise in which 
students, in teams, plan, organize, and manage the 
development and production of a missile system. 
Trade-offs among performance, reliability, cost, 
and schedule; evaluation of technical proposals; 
contract and incentive negotiations; and DSflRC re- 
views are included. PRCRCQUISITC: MN 3301 orMN 
3307 (may be taken concurrently). Graded on a 
Pass/Fail basis only. 

MN 3333 Managerial Communication Skills (4-0). 
Study of communicating as an integral function of 
management. A competency-oriented course de- 
signed to enable students to develop proficiency in 
those aspects of speaking, listening, writing, and 
reading that are particularly relevant to manage- 
ment. Considers various facets of human communi- 
cation in 2-person, small group, audience-sized, 
and organization-wide situations. Topics include 
subordinate-superior interactions, conducting 
meetings, making presentations, writing point 
papers, resolving conflicts, and telecommunicating. 
PRCRCQUISITC: enrollment in an Administrative 
Science curriculum or permission of the Instructor. 

MN 3371 Contracts Managements and fldministra- 
tion (4-0). 

Study of the characteristics and phases of the con- 
tracting process. Coverage includes planning, ex- 
ecution, and control of the contracting process; 
techniques used in purchasing goods and services 
of varying complexities; and the relationship of con- 
tracting to the acquisition process. 

MN 3372 Material Logistics (4-0). 
An overview of the elements of business logistics, 
including purchasing, inventory management, 
warehousing, materials handling, transportation 
and traffic management, facilities location, and the 
structure of the logistics function within an organ- 
ization. PRCRCQUISITC: OS 3105. 

MN 3373 Transportation Management I (4-0). 
Analysis of transportation systems from a mana- 
gerial perspective. Topics include carriers and users 
of systems; alternative modes; intra and intermod- 
al competitive relationships; regulatory and legal 
considerations; demand, cost, and pricing analysis,- 
and managerial resource allocation problems. Ap- 
plication of these topics to the U.S. domestic freight 
transportation network. PRCRCQUISITC: MN 3140 
(may be taken concurrently). 

MN 3374 Production Management (4-0). 
This course examines the production process. 
Cmphasis is distributed among the technical, mana- 
gerial, and defense aspects of production. Topic 
coverage ranges from production planning through 
production control. PRCRCQUISITCS: MN 3105 and 
OS 3106. 



MN 3375 Material Handling Systems (4-0). 
A study of the principles and systems concepts of 
materials handling and their application in the de- 
sign of a materials handling system. An overview of 
current DOD automated materials handling sys- 
tems is also provided. 

MN 3377 Inventory Management (4-0). 
The inventory management process of the Naval 
Supply Systems Command, with emphasis on the 
procedures for determining when and how much of 
a given item to order. Provisioning, wholesale and 
retail replenishment, and the supply budgetary 
process. Required for all Supply Corps officers in 
Administrative Science curricula, except Systems 
Inventory Management. PRCRCQUISITC: OS 3105. 

MN 3650 Health economics (4-0). 
An overview and analysis of the underlying ele- 
ments of the continuing problems in the military 
and civilian health care delivery systems. Clements 
covered are organizational structure and change 
in the mode of health care delivery; supply, de- 
mand, output, and quality measurement of health 
services; the impact of health care legislation; and 
the relationship of the military and civilian sectors. 
PRCRCQUISITC: A course in microeconomics. 

MN 3760 Manpoujer economics I (4-0). 
An introduction to the theoretical aspects of labor 
economics. Concepts covered include the supply of 
labor, the demand for labor, market wage deter- 
mination, internal labor market, human capital for- 
mation, migration and mobility, compensating 
wage differentials, earnings equation, pay and 
employment discrimination, and unemployment 
and inflation. PReRCQUISITIC: MN 3140. 

MN 3801 Technology Transfer (4-0). 
The study of dissemination and utilization of tech- 
nology and associated problems, with emphasis 
on communications, sociology, and organizational 
factors. PRCRCQUISITC: MN 3105 or graduate 
standing in a technical curriculum and persmission 
of the Instructor. 

MN 3900 Readings in Administrative Science (1-0 
to 4-0). 

An individualized program of readings and study in 
some area of the administrative sciences, de- 
signed to meet the student's special educational 
needs. PRCRCQUISITCS: A background in the area of 
study and departmental approval. Graded on a 
Pass/Fail basis only. 

MN 3902 MPT Computer Skills enhancement (0-2). 
extension and application of the basic skills cov- 
ered in MN 2901 . with particular reference to appli- 
cations in current course work. PRCRCQUISITC: MN 
2901. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 



105 



ADMINISTRATE SCI€NC€S 



MN 3903 MPT Computer Applications (0-2). 
Cmpirical analysis of MPT issues and concepts cov- 
ered in MN 3760 and MN 2113, taken concurrently. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: MN 3902. Graded on a Pass/Fail 
basis only. 



Graduate Courses 

MN 4105 Management Policy (4-0). 
Study and analysis of complex managerial situa- 
tions requiring comprehensive integrated decision 
making. Topics include operational and strategic 
planning, policy formulation, executive control, en- 
vironmental adaptation, and management of 
change. Case studies in both the public and private 
sectors are used. PRCRCQUISITC: Open only to stu- 
dents in the final quarter of an Administrative Sci- 
ence curriculum, Computer Systems Management, 
or Telecommunications Systems Management. 

MN 4106 Manpower Personnel Policy Analysis 

(4-0). 

Study and analysis of manpouuer/personnel policy 
alternatives with emphasis on identifying the 
trade-offs involved, the dynamic impact of major 
policy decisions, and the short-term and long-term 
consequences of decisions. Revieuu, use, and eval- 
uation of tools to aid in selecting policy alterna- 
tives. Study of representative cases. PRCRCQUI — 
SITC-: Open only to students in the final quarter of 
the Manpower, Personnel and Training Analysis cur- 
riculum. 

MN 4110 Multivariate Manpower Data Analysis 

(4-2). 

Study of multivariate statistical methods for analyz- 
ing manpower problems. Cmphasis is on use and 
interpretation of multiple regression and related 
techniques as applied to large personnel data 
sets. Skills in the use of computer packages such as 
SPSS and SAS are developed. PRCRCQUISITC: OS 
3106. 

MN 4117 Job Analysis and Personnel Training 

(4-0). 

Study of job analysis and its use in determining 
training requirements. Consideration of instruction- 
al systems development and training pipeline man- 
agement. Attention to cost-benefit issues involving 
training in regard to selection, equipment design, 
changing job requirements, and career develop- 
ment. PR6R6QUISIT6: MN 31 1 1 . 

MN 41 19 Seminar in Monpower Analysis (1-0 to 
4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of current interest in 
manpower analysis, to be determined by the in- 
structor. PRCRCQUISITCS: A background in man- 
power analysis and permission of the Instructor. 



MN 4121 Organization Theory (4-0). 
Study of the major theories of modern organiza- 
tions. This course emphasizes the analysis of or- 
ganizational phenomena from multiple perspec- 
tives, using theories of individual, group, and or- 
ganizational behavior. Topics include organization 
design and culture, political analysis of organiza- 
tions, management of change, open systems theo- 
ry, and contingency theories. PRCRCQUISITC: MN 
3105. 

MN 41 22 Planning and Control: Measurement and 
evaluation (4-0). 

Theory and techniques of the managerial functions 
of planning and control. Cmphasis is placed on the 
effects of the planning and control structure on the 
behavior of human components of the system. Top- 
ics include the problems associated w ith the util- 
ization of surrogates for measurement purposes; 
the analysis of the influence of assumptions, val- 
ues, and objectives on the planning and control 
process; budgeting and forecasting; and perfor- 
mance evaluation and the reward structure. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: MN 3105 and MN 3161. 

MN 4125 Managing Planned Change in Complex 
Organizations (4-0). 

examination of the approaches to planning and 
managing change efforts in complex social systems 
made up of the interdependent components of 
technology, structure, task, and people and of the 
role of the manager or staff specialist and the pro- 
cess of helping. Cmphasis is placed on strategies 
and technologies for diagnosis and planning aimed 
at effective implementation. Opportunities for 
practice using both simulations and actual organ- 
izational cases. Focuses on problems involved in ef- 
fective implementation of technologically, structur- 
ally, or human resource based planned change ef- 
forts. PRCRCQUISITC: MN 3105. 

MN 4126 Seminar in the Behaviorial Sciences (1-0 
to 4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of current interest in the 
behavioral sciences, to be determined by the in- 
structor. PRCR6QUISITCS: A background in the be- 
havioral sciences and permission of the Instructor. 

MN 4127 Seminar in Organization Behavior (1-0 
to 4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of current interest in 
organization behavior, to be determined by the 
instructor. PRCRCQUISITCS: A background in organi- 
zation behavior and permission of the instructor. 

MN 4145 Policy Analysis (4-0). 
The application of economic methods to nonmarket 
transactions. Analysis of large scale defense re- 
source allocation problems. UUeapon system defini- 
tion. Life cycle cost models. C-xamples of cost- 
benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. PRCRCQ- 
UISIT6S: MN 3140, MN 3161, and OS 3106. 



106 



RDMINISTRRTIV6 SCI6NC6S 



MN 4151 Internal Control and Financial Ruditing 

(4-0). 

Study of the objectives and techniques of internal 
control systems and of audits of financial reports 
and records. Specific topics include the indepen- 
dent audit function in America, audit evidence, au- 
dit evidence, audit procedures, the auditor's de- 
cision process, statistical sampling, and special 
controls and audit problems in computer-based 
systems. Audits of several transaction cycles ore 
examined. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: MN 31 61 , OS 31 06, and 
a basic computer course. 

MN 41 52 Corporate Financial Management (4-0). 
The management of the finance function in industry, 
with particular attention to defense contractors. 
Specific topics include cash and working capital 
management, long-term financing, and determina- 
tion of optimal capital structure. PRC-RCQUISITC: 
MN 3161. 

MN 41 53 Seminar in Financial Management ( 1 -0 to 
4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of current interest in 
financial management, to be determined by the 
instructor. PRC-R6QUISITC-S: A background in finan- 
cial management and permission of the Instructor. 
MN 4154 Financial Management in the firmed 
Forces (4-0). 

Review of financial management concepts and 
practices in DOD and the Armed Forces, with em- 
phasis on the Department of the Navy. Includes 
study of PP6S, controllership, budget formulation 
and execution, headquarters and field activity ac- 
counting systems, and various types of funds. PRC-- 
R6QUISIT6S: MN 21 55 or MN 31 61 and MN 31 72. 
MN 4155 Operational Auditing (4-0). 
This course examines auditing as a tool of manage- 
ment control in large, complex organizations. Case 
studies are used to discuss the scope of the audit, 
audit procedures, audit findings and recommenda- 
tions, auditor training and professionalism, and the 
roles and responsibilities of auditee-managers, 
users of audit reports, and auditors. The General 
Accounting Office's audit and internal control stan- 
dards are also examined, as well as directives of 
the Office of Management and Budget, Depart- 
ment of Defense, and Department of the Navy. Dur- 
ing the last few weeks, students do field research 
on an operational audit for a local organization. 
PR6RC-QUISITC-: MN 3161. This course should be 
taken during one of the last three quarters of the 
student's program. 

MN 4159 Financial Reporting and Analysis (4-0). 
Advanced study of basic accounting concepts un- 
derlying published financial reports. Cmphasis is 
placed on the measurement, communication, and 
evaluation processes. Topics include setting ac- 
counting policies, alternative bases of valuation, 
alternative concepts of earnings, and discussion of 
controversial accounting issues. The course takes 
the perspective of managers and users of financial 
information. PRC-RCQUISIT6: MN 3161. 



MN 4161 Finandal Management Control Systems 

(4-0). 

Study of the structure and the processes of man- 
agement control in government organizations. 
Specific topics include the basic concepts of plan- 
ning and control, organization of the management 
control function, measurement of inputs and out- 
puts, pricing government services, programming, 
budgeting, accounting, and performance evalua- 
tion. PR€R€QUISIT€S: MN 3105 and MN 21 55orMN 
3161. 

MN 4162 Cost Recounting (4-0). 
Review of basic cost accounting procedures. In- 
depth study of cost accounting systems, allocation 
of direct and indirect costs to cost objectives, and 
special problems of accounting for materials, labor, 
and overhead costs. Specific attention is given to 
the objectives and the substance of Cost Account- 
ing Standards for negotiated defense procurement 
contracts. PRC-R6QUISITC: MN 3161. 

MN 4163 Analytical Techniques for Financial Con- 
trol and Planning (4-0).* 

Study of quantitative methods most useful for 
financial planning and control. Cmphasis is on de- 
veloping quantitative methods as decision support 
tools, with available computer software as compu- 
tational aids. Covered are introductions to the rele- 
vant quantitative techniques, the conditions for 
successful applications, data needed for applica- 
tions, and the use of computational aids for prob- 
lem solving. The goal is to provide sufficient compe- 
tency for students to apply sophisticated analyti- 
cal techniques to various planning and control en- 
vironments in the public sector. PRCRCQUISITCS: 
MN 3161 and OS 3106. 

MN 4301 Contracting for Major Systems (4-0). 
Study of the major systems contracting process, 
procedures, and practices. This course focuses on 
the contracting process of the Navy Systems Com- 
mands and the Major UJeapons Acquisition Process 
as described in S6CNAVINST 5000.1. Major topics 
include contracting organization for systems acqui- 
sition, systems acquisition process, business clear- 
ance process, source selection, multi-year procure- 
ment, IMIP, and administration of major contracts. 
Related topics include funding, reliability/main- 
tainability, ILS, foreign military sales, and initial 
provisioning/spare parts support. PRCR6QUISIT6: 
MN 3305 or permission of the Instructor. 

MN 4302 Public expenditure Policy and Analysis 

(4-0). 

The process of government decision making, partic- 
ularly as reflected in the defense budgeting pro- 
cess. Models of budget decision making, including 
decentralization. Application of social choice con- 
cepts. Illustrations from the defense budgeting 
process PRCR6QUISIT6: MN 4145. 



107 



RDMINISTRATIV6 SCI6NC6S 



MN 4310 Logistics engineering (4-0). 
The concept of integrated logistics support and its 
development. The maintenance concept, functional 
analysis, life cyde costs, logistics support analysis, 
human factors in design, provisioning and resupplu 
of repair and spare parts, test and evaluation, and 
production. PR6R6QUISIT6: OS 3006 (concurrently). 

MN 4371 Acquisition and Contracting Policy (4-0). 
fl seminar using case studies to oppraise govern- 
ment and business acquisition/contracting poli- 
cies. €mphasis is on acquisition/contracting de- 
cision making and policy formulation. PR€R€Q- 
UISIT6S: MN 4301 or MN 3301 and MN 3371 and 
permission of the instructor. 

MN 4372 Seminar in Requisition and Contract Man- 
agement (1-0 to 4-0). 

Study of a variet of topics of current interest in ac- 
quisition and contracting, to be determined by the 
instructor. PR6R6QUISIT6S: fl background in ac- 
quisition and permission of the Instructor. 

MN 4373 Transportation Management II (4-0). 
fl continuation of MN 3373. Concentration on the 
management of large-scale transportation net- 
works, emphasizing international transportation 
and the role of the U.S. merchant marine. Also cov- 
ered are the DOD transportation agencies and cur- 
rent research in transportation. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
MN 3373. 

MN 4376 Seminar in Material Logistics (4-0). 
Study of a variety of topics of current interest in 
logistics, to be determined by the instructor. Pfl€- 
R6QUISIT6S: fl background in logistics and permis- 
sion of the Instructor. 

MN 4500 Productivity Analysis (4-0). 
Study of the theoretical and institutional founda- 
tions of the analysis of productivity measurement 
and enhancement programs in DOD. 6mphasis is 
placed on methods of applying microeconomic and 
organizational effectiveness principles and con- 
cepts to the critical analysis of proposed and ex- 
isting DOD productivity programs, as well as to the 
development of alternatives which have higher 
probabilities of effecting the desired increases in 
program effectiveness and efficiency. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6S: MN 3105 and MN 3140. 

MN 4650 The Military Health Care Delivery System 

and Analysis (4-0). 

This course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the structure and operation of the Department 
of Defense's system for providing health care to 
those eligible under current regulations; to identify 
current problem areas,- and, through application of 
systems analysis and management techniques, to 
address the possible solutions to these problems 
in o course project. Pfi€fl€QUISIT€: MN 3650. 



MN 4651 Hospital economics and Systems Analysis 

(4-0). 

This course deals analytically and empirically with 
the major organizational and economic structures 
and problems associated with the operation of a 
health care delivery facility or group of facilities 
(hospital or integrated group of clinics). The roles 
of institutional incentives, methods of reimburse- 
ment, provider organization and payment, and 
exogenous factors such as general inflation and 
legislative parameters are discussed. The objec- 
tive is a working knowledge of these major ele- 
ments in the health care production process and 
probble systemic change. PR€R€QUISIT€:MN 3650. 
MN 4652 Micro Health Systems Analysis (4-0). 
The purpose of this course is to analyze in depth, 
using analyses of extant institutional constructs, 
the potential for deriving policy recommendations 
and designing research to motivate more efficient 
provision of health care by individual facilities. The 
emphasis is on identifying gaps in incentives and 
organizational structures which lead to suboptimal 
facility behavior in the cost containment and quali- 
ty areas. PR€R€QUISIT€S: MN 4650 and MN 4651 . 

MN 4761 Manpower economics II (4-0). 
fl continuation and application of theoretical de- 
velopment in MN 3760. Recent applications of 
economic analysis to manpower, personnel, and 
training problems are studied. Typical topics in- 
clude accession, supply models, turnover and re- 
tention models, alternative retirement systems, 
civilian earnings effects on military employment, 
alternative compensation systems, career mix, and 
billet cost estimation. PR6R6QUISIT6: MN 3760. 
MN 4900 Readings in Administrative Science (1-0 
to 4-0). 

An individualized program of advanced readings 
and study in some area of administrative science. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: fl background of advanced work in 
the area of study and departmental approval. 
Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 
MN 4904 Advanced MPT Computer Applications 
(0-2). 

Applications of computer skills to problems and is- 
sues developed in MN 21 14, MN 41 10, and MN 
4761 (taken concurrently). PR€R€QUISIT€: MN 
3903. Graded on a Pass/Fair basis only. 
MN 4942 The Structure, Conduct and Performance 
of the Defense Industries (4-0). 
A study of selected defense industries' structures 
(e.g., seller concentration, product differentiation, 
barriers to entry, demand for products, and buyer 
concentration), conduct (e.g., pricing policy, prod- 
uct characteristics policy, and policies toward rivals 
and customers), and performance (e.g., efficiency, 
progress, and employment). The government as 
consumer and regulator. Typical industries studied 
are aerospace, computers, shipbuilding, and tele- 
communications. PR6R6QUISIT6: MN 3140 or 
equivalent. 



108 



ADMINISTRTIV6 SCI6NC6S 



MN 4945 Seminar in economics (1-0 to 4-0). 



Study of a variety of topics of current interest in 
economics, to be determined by the instructor. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: A background in economics and 
permission of the Instructor. 



MN 4970 Seminar in Administrative Sdence ( 1 -0 to 
4-0). 

Study of a variety of topics of general interest in 
the administrative sciences, to be determined by 
the instructor. PR6R6QUISIT6S: A background in 
administrative sciences and permission of the 
Instructor. 




109 



fi€RONAUTICS 



D€PfiRTM€NT Of n€RON0UTICS 



Chairman: 

Max f. Platzer, Professor, 

Code 67, Halligan Hall, Room 1 35, 

(408) 646-231 1, flV 878-231 1. 

Associate Chairman: 

Donald M. layton, Professor, 

Code 67ln, Halligan Hall, Room 253, 

(408) 646-2997, flV 878-2997. 



The Department of Reronautics provides 
advanced professional knowledge in the 
field of Reronautical engineering in order to 
provide Navy technical managers with a 
broad base education. Basic and advanced 
graduate courses are offered in fluid me- 
chanics, structures, guidance and control, 
flight mechanics and propulsion for rotary and 
fixed-wing aircraft and missiles. 

Rfter a preparatory phase and a graduate 
core series of courses, students specialize in 
the advanced graduate phase in either aero- 
nautical Engineering (Curriculum 61 0) or Rero- 
Electronic Engineering (Curriculum 611). The 
Degree of Master of Science in Reronautical 
Engineering is offered in both Curricula. Se- 
lected students may be eligible to pursue the 
degree of Reronautical Engineer or Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

The Deportment of Reronautics received a 
renewal of its full six (6) year accreditation 
from the Rccreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology in 1 984. 

€NTRRNC€ 

R€QUIR€M€NTS FOR 

STUDY OF RCRONRUTICRL 

€NGIN€€RING 

The entrance requirement for study in the 
Department of Reronautics generally is a bac- 
calaureate in engineering earned with above 
overage academic performance. This require- 
ment can sometimes be waived for students 
who have shown distinctly superior ability in 
backgrounds other than engineering but who 
have had adequate coverage in the basic 
physical and mathematical sciences. Rll en- 
trants must obtain the approval of the Chair- 



man, Department of Reronautics. 

Students who have not majored in Rero- 
nautics, or who have experienced a signif- 
icant lapse in continuity with previous aca- 
demic work, initially will take preparatory 
courses in aeronautical engineering and 
mathematics at the upper division level, ex- 
tending through the first three academic 
quarters and constituting a portion of the 
course-work for degrees in Reronautics. Final 
approval of programs leading to degrees in 
Reronautical Engineering must be obtained 
from the Chairman, Department of Reronau- 
tics. 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN RCRONRUTICRl €NGIN€€RING 

Upon completing the preparatory courses, 
students may be selected on the basis of 
academic performance for the degree pro- 
gram leading to the Master of Science in Rer- 
onautical Engineering. However, students 
who have recently earned a degree with 
major in Reronautics may apply for admission 
directly to the graduate program. 

The Master of Science degree requires a 
minimum of 36 credit hours of graduate 
courses, of which at least 1 2 credit hours shall 
be at the 4000 level. It also requires that not 
less than 32 credit hours shall be in the disci- 
plines of engineering, physical science or 
mathematics, and that this shall include a 
minimum of 20 hours of courses in the Depart- 
ment of Reronautics and a minimum of 8 hours 
in other departments. 

Rn acceptable thesis is required for the 
degree unless waived by the Chairman, De- 
partment of Reronautics, in which case 10 
quarter hours of 4000 level courses in the dis- 
ciplines of engineering, physical science, or 
mathematics will be required in addition to 
those specified above, increasing the total 
requirement to 46 quarter hours of graduate 
level credits. 



110 



RERONAUTICS 



R6RONRUTICRI €NGIN€€R 

Upon completing the equivalent of two 
quarters of a graduate program, students 
may be selected on the basis of academic 
performance for the program leading to the 
degree Aeronautical €ngineer. Selection to 
this degree program shall be limited to those 
students who, in the opinion of the faculty, 
have the potential to conduct the required re- 
search. The degree Aeronautical Engineer 
requires a minimum of 72 credit hours of grad- 
uate courses, of which at least 40 credit hours 
shall be at the 4000 level. It also requires 
that not less than 64 credit hours shall be in 
the disciplines of engineering, physical sci- 
ence, or mathematics, and that this shall in- 
clude a minimum of 36 hours of courses in the 
Department of Aeronautics and a minimum of 
1 2 hours in other departments. An acceptable 
thesis is required for the degree. 

Students admitted to work for the degree 
Aeronautical Engineer may be satisfying re- 
quirements for the Master of Science degree 
concurrently. The Master of Science in Aero- 
nautical Engineering may be conferred at the 
time of completion of the requirements for 
that degree. 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

RND 
DOCTOR OF €NGIN€€RING 

The Department of Aeronautics offers pro- 
grams leading to the doctorate in the fields of 
gasdynamics, flight structures, flight dynam- 
ics, propulsion, aerospace physics, and aero- 
space vehicle design. 

Entrance into the doctoral program may be 
requested by officers currently enrolled who 
have sufficiently high standing. A departmen- 
tal screening examination will be adminis- 
tered to those so requesting. The Depart- 
ment of Aeronautics also accepts officer stu- 
dents selected in the Navy-wide Doctoral 
Study Program, and civilian students selected 
from employees of the United States Federal 
Government. 



All applicants who are not already enrolled 
as students in the Department of Aeronautics 
shall submit transcripts of their previous aca- 
demic and professional records and letters of 
recommendation to the Department Chair- 
man. The Chairman, with the advice of other 
department members, shall decide whether 
to admit the applicant to the Doctoral Pro- 
gram. 

Every applicant who is accepted for the 
Doctoral Program will initially be enrolled in 
the AeE Program under a special option which 
satisfies the broad departmental require- 
ments for the Engineer's degree and which 
includes research work. As soon as feasible, 
the student must find a faculty advisor to 
supervise his research and help him initially in 
the formulation of his plans for advanced 
study. As early as practicable thereafter, a 
doctoral committee shall be appointed to 
oversee that student's individual doctoral 
program as provided in the school-wide re- 
quirements for the Doctor's degree. 

A noteworthy feature of the program lead- 
ing to the Doctor of Engineering degree is 
that the student's research may be con- 
ducted away from the Naval Postgraduate 
School in a cooperating laboratory or other 
installation of the federal government. The 
degree requirements are outlined in general 
school requirements for the Doctor's degree. 

In the event that a student is unable finally 
to satisfy the above requirements for the 
doctorate for any reason but has in the 
course of his doctoral studies actually com- 
pleted all of the requirements for the degree 
of Aeronautical Engineer, he shall be awarded 
the latter degree. 

R€RONRUTICRL LABORATORY 

Eight major laboratory divisions support 
instructional and research programs in sub- 
sonic aerodynamics, gas dynamics, rocket 
and ramjet propulsion, turbomachinery, com- 
puter-aided engineering, flight mechanics, 
structures and composite materials. 

The subsonic aerodynamics laboratory 
consists of two low-speed wind tunnels and a 
large continuous flow visualization tunnel. 
Standard wind tunnel techniques are used in 
the 32 x 45 inch and 42 x 60 inch tunnels and 
helium bubble filaments are used in the 
5x5x12 foot test section of the three-dimen- 
sional flow visualization tunnel. 



Ill 



AERONAUTICS 



The gas dynamics laboratory includes a 
4x4 inch blowdown supersonic wind tunnel, 
a cold driven, three-inch double-diaphragm 
shock tube, a 2 x 2 x 1 8 foot open-circuit oscil- 
lating flow wind tunnel and a vertically 
mounted, supersonic free-jet. Laser inter- 
ferometers, schlieren systems, hot wire ane- 
mometry and laser-doppler anemometers 
are used for flow visualizations. Ruby, He-Ne, 
Rrgon and CO lasers are available. Extensive 
use is made of laser holography. Rn electro- 
hydrodynamic research facility permits stud- 
ies of electric power generation, turbulence 
and fuel sprays into gas turbine combustors. 

The combustion laboratory consists of an 
instrumented control room, a propellant eval- 
uation laboratory, a high pressure air facility 
and three test cells equipped with diagnostic 
apparatus and motor hardware for investi- 
gating solid, liquid, gaseous and hybrid rock- 
et, solid fuel ramjet and gas turbine combus- 
tion. Vitiated air heaters are used to gen- 
erate temperatures to 1 300 °R. Several CUU 
and one pulsed laser with holocamera, high 
speed motion picture cameras, light scatter- 
ing and transmission measurement systems, 
schlieren systems, sampling probes and a 
dark room equipped for holographic recon- 
struction and data retrieval are utilized. 

The Turbo-Propulsion Laboratory (TPL) 
houses a unique collection of experimental 
facilities for research and development re- 
lated to compressors, turbines and advanced 
air-breathing propulsion engine concepts. In 
a complex of specially designed concrete 
structures, one building, powered by a 750 
HP compressor, contains 10 x 60 inch rectilin- 
ear and 4x8 foot diameter radial cascade 
wind tunnels and a large 3-stage axial re- 
search compressor for low speed studies. R 
second building, powered by a 1 250 HP com- 
pressed air plant, contains fully instrumented 
transonic turbine and compressor rigs in ex- 
plosion proof test cells. R spinpit for structural 
testing of rotors to 50,000 RPM and 1 800 °F is 
provided. Model experiments and equipment 
for instrumentation development are located 
in separate laboratory. Data acquisition from 
400 channels of steady state and 1 6 chan- 
nels of non-steady state measurements at 
up to 1 OOkHZ is controlled by the laboratory's 
HP 1 00 series computer system. On-line re- 
duction and presentation of data with time 
sharing terminals are available to multiple 
users. Terminals for HP 9845 and the central 



IBM 307-3033 computers are available for 
data analysis or flow computation. 

The Computer Rided Design — Computer 
Rided Engineering (CRD/CRC) laboratory is a 
joint Department of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing — Department of Reronautics project. 
This laboratory, which is now under develop- 
ment, will have twelve 32-bit networked 
CRD/CRE workstations, twenty-four micro- 
computer systems and two computer-con- 
trolled data acquisition systems. 

The flight mechanics laboratory, also under 
development, will consist of a fixed-base, 
six-degree-of-freedom flight simulator for 
ground based studies. R remotely controlled 
helicopter model is used in rotary-wing 
studies. 

The structural test laboratory contains test- 
ing machines for static and dynamic tests of 
materials and structures and an electro- 
hydraulic closed-loop machine for fatigue 
testing. Rircraft components as large as an 
actual aircraft wing are accommodated on a 
special loading floor where static and vibra- 
tion tests are conducted. The dynamics sec- 
tion of this laboratory contains shaker tables, 
analog computers and associated instrumen- 
tation. Rn adjacent strain gage and photo- 
elastic facility provides support to test pro- 
grams and instruction in structural testing 
techniques. 

The Mechanics of Materials for Composites 
laboratory is equipped with fabrication and 
testing facilities for characterizing the me- 
chanical behavior of fiber-reinforced com- 
posites. The fabrication facilities include an 
oven and press with provisions for computer 
control of temperature and pressure profile 
for fabrication of laminates and strands. The 
testing facilities include five mechanically 
driven universal testing machines for general 
testing and for life testing. These testing 
facilities are supported by a wide array of 
modern data acquisition instruments includ- 
ing computer controlled data loggers, digital 
voltmeters, acoustic emission analyzer and 
laser diffraction instruments. Personal com- 
puters and a VRX-725 provide ample capac- 
ity for analytical interpretation of data and 
for model formulation. 

Through a Memorandum of Understanding 
with the National Reronautics and Space 
Rdministration (NRSR), the Joint NRSR Rmes 
Research Center — NPS Department of Rero- 
nautics Institute permits selected students 



112 



AERONAUTICS 



Prom the Department of Reronoutics to con- 
duct their thesis research in the NRSR labora- 
tories. 



SPflC€ SYSTCMS LABORATORIES 

Laboratories which support the Space Sys- 
tems Programs are located in several depart- 
ments including Physics. Oceanography and 
Electrical and Computer Engineering. Refer to 
the appropriate part of the catalog for des- 
criptions. Aeronautics has developed a Solar 
Simulator laboratory which features a 2500ULI 
source. Experiments are computer controlled 
using IBM/PC with ISRRC 2000 controller. 
Solar cells can be tested for radiation dam- 
age using the LINRC or Pulserod sources which 
are located in Physics. The Loser Damage Fa- 
cility is a Joint Physics/ Reronautics labora- 
tory developed to support instruction and re- 
search related to such topics as satellite vul- 
nerability. The Laser Damage Facility features 
a pulsed CO electrical laser with sufficient 
irradiance to generate laser supported det- 
onation waves, fin optics laboratory is also 
available which utilizes lasers for such space 
functions as remote sensing in addition to 
precision optical measurements. 



DEPARTMENTAL 
COURS€ OFFERINGS 

AERONAUTICS 

AC 0010 Aeronautical engineering Seminar (0-1 ). 

Oral presentations of material not covered in for- 
mal courses. Topics cover a wide spectrum of sub- 
jects ranging from reports of current research to sur- 
vey treatments of fields of scientific and engineer- 
ing interest. 

fl€ 0020 Aeronautical engineering Program Plan- 
ning (0-1 ). 

Oral presentations by the Aeronautics Academic 
Associate and faculty members involved in re- 
search with Aeronautical students on program 
planning, thesis requirements and research spe- 
cialty areas. 

A€ 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

Cvery student conducting thesis research will enroll 

in this course. 



Upper Division Courses 

Some preparatory courses in Aeronautics are 
available through the Continuing education Divi- 
sion. These one-credit hour mini-courses have been 
prepared in a self-instructional mode (PSI) and 
complete descriptions for each mini-course may be 
found in the Continuing education catalog. The mini- 
courses are equivalent to, and may be substituted 
for, the on-campus courses as follows: 

Campus equivalent mini- 

course sequence 

A€ 2021 AC 21 01 through 21 06 

AC 2042 AC 2401 through 2404 

A€ 2015 engineering Dynamics (3-2). 
Fundamental physical concepts; dynamics of parti- 
cles and of systems of particles; concepts of work- 
energy and impulse-momentum; rigid-body dynam- 
ics in two dimensions. PACACQUISITC: MA 2121. 

A€ 2021 Introduction to Flight Structures (4-1). 
Introduction to concepts of stress and strain, and 
mechanical behavior of materials. Bending and tor- 
sional stress and deflection analysis of representa- 
tive aero-structural components, including statical- 
ly indeterminate cases. Introduction to stability 
analysis, and energy methods. (May be taken 
through Continuing education as mini-courses AC 
2101-06.) 

A€ 2035 Basic Aerodynamics (3-2). 
Continuity/Momentum equations; dimensional 
analysis; elements of two dimensional ideal flow; 
thin-airfoil, finite wing theory. PACACQUISITC: AC 
2042. 

AC 2036 Performance and Stability (3-2). 
Model atmosphere; defined airspeeds; aircraft per- 
formance including climb, range, endurance and 
energy management; principles of longitudinal, 
lateral and directional static stability and control of 
aircraft. PACACQUISITC: AC 2035. 

R€ 2042 Fundamentals of Thermo-Fluid Dynamics 

(3-2). 

Properties of fluids. Principles of continuity, momen- 
tum, and energy for incompressible and compressi- 
ble fluids; control volume formulations. Second law 
of thermodynamics, entropy and irreversibilities; 
equations of state, properties of pure substances; 
power cycles. Viscous flows, boundary layer con- 
cepts. (May be taken through Continuing education 
as mini-courses AC 2401-2404.) 

AC 2043 Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics (3-2). 
Concepts of compressible flows, adiabatic/ isen- 
tropic flow; normal shocks, moving and oblique 
shocks, Prandtl-Meyer flow; fanno and Aayleigh 
flow; introduction to reaction propulsion systems. 
PACACQUISITC: AC 2042. 



113 



AERONAUTICS 



fl€ 2801 Aero-Laborotories (3-2). 
fin introduction to modern experimental techniques 
and instrumentation. Lectures and demonstrations 
in the use of sensing devices and data acquisition 
systems, data reduction and analysis, report writ- 
ing. Selected experiments in all aeronautical lab- 
oratories. PRCRCQUISITCS: fl€ 2021, 2035, 2043, 
and 2015 (concurrent) or equivalent. 

Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

R63001 Space Systems Laboratory (0-2). 

(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this listing.) 

A€ 3005 Survey of Aircraft 6t Missile Technology 

(4-0). 

(For Non-Aeronautical engineering Students) fl sur- 
vey of aeronautical engineering concepts as ap- 
plied to airplanes and missiles, starting with expla- 
nations of the basic principles of aerodynamics, 
performance, propulsion, etc., and extending to 
examples of these principles in present-day hard- 



A€ 3101 Flight Vehicle Structural Analysis (3-2). 
Graduate core course in structures covering basic 
definitions and field equations for solid bodies, 
two-dimensional stress analysis, thin skin and thick 
skin wing bending analysis, fracture and fatigue 
theory. PRCRCQUISITC: fl€ 2021 or equivalent. 

A€ 3201 System Safety Management and engi- 
neering (3-2). 

Rn introduction to System Safety, with emphasis on 
the requirements imposed by MILSTD-882R. Funda- 
mental mathematical concepts (probabilities, dis- 
tribution theory. Boolean algebra); safety analysis 
techniques (hazard analysis, fault-tree analysis, 
sneak circuit analysis); safety criteria, tasks, data, 
and documentation; lifecycle considerations. 

A€ 3251 Aircraft Combat Survivability (4-1 )). 

This course brings together all of the essential in- 
gredients in a study of the survivability of fixed 
wing, rotary wing and missile aircraft in a hostile 
(non-nuclear) environment. The technology for in- 
creasing survivability and the methodology for 
assessing the probability of survival in a RRR/SflM/ 
Laser environment are presented in some detail. 
Topics to be covered include: current and future 
threat descriptions; the mission/threat analysis; 
combat data analysis of SCR and Mid-Cast losses; 
vulnerability reduction techniques and technology 
for the major aircraft systems; susceptibility reduc- 
tion concepts and equipment for reducing the prob- 
ability of detection and avoidance of the threat; 
and vulnerability, susceptibility and survivability 
assessment and trade-off methodology. In-depth 
studies of the survivability of several fixed wing 
and rotary wing aircraft will be presented. PRCRCQ- 
UISITC: U.S. Citizenship and SCCRCT clearance. 



A€ 3304 Rotary Wing Aircraft Technology (3-2). 
(For Non-Aeronautical engineering Students) R 
course designed to familiarize the student with the 
major aerodynamic, propulsion, structural, and sta- 
bility and control aspects of rotary wing aircraft, 
past and current helicopter developments, technol- 
ogy status and problems. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent 
of Instructor. 

A€ 3305 V/STOL Aircraft Technology (4-0). 
(For Non-Aeronautical engineering students) Basic 
aerodynamic and propulsion principles and phe- 
nomena, past and current vertical take-off and 
landing aircraft developments, current technology 
status and problems. U.S. Navy V/STOL aircraft re- 
quirements and acquisition programs. Russian 
V/STOL aircraft and assessment of USSR-V/STOL 
aircraft technology and trends, impact of V/STOL 
aircraft technology on naval systems acquisition 
and operations. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Instruc- 
tor. 

A€ 3340 Linear Vibration and Dynamic Stability 

(3-2). 

Single and multiple degree of freedom systems; 
damped/undamped; free/forced response. Contin- 
uous systems. Stability derivatives: aircraft equa- 
tions of motion; uncoupled and cross-coupled 
modal solutions. PRCRCQUISITCS: AC 2015 and 
2036. 

A€ 3341 Control of Aerospace Vehicles (3-2). 
Clements of classical control analysis as applied to 
aircraft and missiles; Bode, Nyquist, Root Locus 
methods; compensators, autopilot design, stability 
augmentation systems. State-variable methods, 
state-variable feedback, controllability, observa- 
bility, and introduction to discrete systems. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: CC 2402, and AC 3340. 

A€ 3451 Aircraft and Missile Propulsion (3-2). 
Description, design criteria, analysis and perfor- 
mance of ramjets, turboprops, turbojets, and turbo- 
fans. Analysis of components: inlets, compressors, 
combustors, turbines and nozzles. Current state-of- 
the-art and impact of trends in propulsion technol- 
ogy. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 2043. 

A€ 3501 Current Aerodynamic Analysis (3-2). 
Introduction to current aerodynamic analysis meth- 
ods for subsonic and supersonic flight vehicles. 
Developments proceed from the three-dimensional 
Navier-Stokes equations to various approximation 
methods, such as linearized, inviscid, subsonic and 
supersonic panel methods for wing-body combina- 
tions; discussion of sweep-back effect and area 
rule; laminar and turbulent boundary layer analysis; 
use of state-of-the-art computer programs. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: AC 2043 and AC 2035. 

A€ 3701 Missile Aerodynamics (4-1 ). 

(See UJeapons engineering and Space Science 
Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



114 



fl€RONAUTICS 



A€3705 Air Defense letholity (4-1). 

(See Weapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this listing.) 

06 371 1 Missile Flight Analysis (4-0). 

(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this list.) 

A€ 3795 Introduction to Space Warfare (4-0). 
(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 
Course listing at the end of this listing.) 

R€ 3802 Advanced Aeronautical Measurement 
Techniques and Test Facilities (2-3). 
This course is intended to introduce the student to 
aeronautical measuring techniques and test facili- 
ties used by NASA and the aerospace industry 
during the research, development, and testing 
phase (RDT&C) of aircraft and missile systems. 
Applications of laser-doppler velocimetru, hot wire 
instrumentation, flouu visualization methods and 
modern data acquisition sustems will be demon- 
strated. Field trips to NASA Ames Aesearch Center 
will be arranged to show how the advanced tech- 
niques and facilities are applied to solve real-world 
problems in aeronautics. 

AC 3900 Special Topics in Aeronautics 
(Variable credit up to five hours. ) 

Directed graduate study or laboratory research. 
Course may be repeated for additional credit if top- 
ic changes. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Department 
Chairman. 

Graduate Courses 
fl€ 41 02 Advanced Aircraft /Missile Structural Anal- 
ysis (3-2). 

The finite element method of structural analysis will 
be studied and applied to aircraft and missile struc- 
tures. Capabilities of the current finite element com- 
puter programs will be discussed. An introduction 
to the theory of structural dynamics and stability 
will also be presented. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 3101. 

A€ 4103 Advanced Aircraft Construction (3-2). 
A course covering the manufacturing techniques 
and analysis of composite materials and sandwich 
construction. Theories of failure, damage and re- 
pair. Advanced design concepts. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 
3101. 

AC 4202 Reliability in Structures and Materials 
(3-0). 

A course providing the background and specifics 
associated with the design, certification and main- 
tenance of structures in critical applications. The 
background includes an introduction to probability, 
reliability in design, and statistical modeling. The 
specifics include reliability, testing and statistical 
modeling of structures with applications to materi- 
als development, life durability characterization, 
proof-test, and maintenance of advanced compos- 
ite materials. PRCRCQUISITC: Graduate Standing in 
an Cngineering/Science Curriculum. 



A€ 4273 Aircraft Design (3-2). 
A course in conceptual design methodology which 
centers around an individual student design proj- 
ect. It draws upon all of the aeronautics disciplines 
and provides the student with experience in their 
application to design. PRCRCQUISITC: Completion 
of the Aero Graduate Core. 

A€ 4304 Helicopter Performance (3-2). 
The performance characteristics of rotary wing air- 
craft. Blade motion, momentum theory, blade ele- 
ment theory, tip loss factor, ground effect, hover, 
vertical flight, forward flight, climbing flight, auto- 
rotation, tail rotors, range and endurance, and mul- 
tiple rotors. Numerical problems in helicopter per- 
formance. PRCRCQUISITC: Aero Preparatory Phase 
or equivalent. 

A€ 4305 V/STOl Aircraft Technology (3-2). 
Types of V/STOL aircraft, fundamental principles, 
main performance characteristics, and propulsion 
requirements, STOL technology: mechanical high- 
lift devices, powered-lift devices, jet flaps, aug- 
mentor wings; VTOL technology: flow vectoring de- 
vices, lift engine and lift fan technology, augmentor 
wings; airframe/propulsion system interactions, 
ground interference effects: V/STOL stability and 
control considerations, handling qualities; review 
of current development programs, NAW V/STOL 
requirements and programs. PRCRCQUISITC: Aero 
Graduate Core or permission of Instructor. 

A€ 4306 Helicopter Design (3-2) 
engineering problems that are to be found in ro- 
tary-wing design are presented for solution to 
develop a basic understanding of the conceptual 
design process for both single and multi-rotor heli- 
copters. Interfaces of sub-systems and the required 
design tradeoffs, including economic and opera- 
tional factors, are emphasized. A preliminary de- 
sign of a single rotor helicopter is conducted to 
meet specified requirements and the performance 
of the resulting vehicle is evaluated. PRCRCQUISITC: 
AC 4304. 

A€ 4307 Advanced Helicopter Design (3-2). 
An extension of the conceptual design concept to a 
more detailed design. Clements of static and dy- 
namic stability, control, weight and balance, de- 
tailed sizings, and effects of parameter variation 
are considered. The detailed design will usually be 
limited to a single area. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 4306. 

AC 4318 Aeroelasticity (4-0). 
Response of discrete and continuous elastic struc- 
tures to transient loads and to steady oscillatory 
loads. Static aeroelasticity, non-stationary airfoil 
and wing theory. Unsteady missile aerodynamics. 
Application to the flutter problem. Transient loads, 
gusts, buffet, and stall flutter. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 
3340. 



115 



AERONAUTICS 



R€ 4323 Flight evaluation Techniques (3-2). 
Quantitative and qualitative techniques for the 
evaluation of aircraft performance and handling 
qualities of flight; aircraft data acquisition systems 
normalizing and standardizing of flight test data 
pilot rating scales; effects of design parameters 
application of specifications to flight evaluations. 
In-flight laboratory is provided. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 
3340. 



A€ 4342 Advanced Control for Aerospace Systems 
(3-2). 

State variable analysis including state variable 
feedback and state variable estimators (observ- 
ers). Optimal control; digital fly-by-uuire systems. 
Topics from non-linear systems and/or stochastic 
control. PR€R€QUISIT€: R€ 3341. 



A€ 4343 Guided Weapon Control Systems (3-2). 
Detailed analysis of tactical missiles, performance 
of target trackers, basic aerodynamics of missiles, 
missile autopilot design, missile servos and instru- 
ments, line of sight guidance loops, terminal guid- 
ance, proportional navigation. PRCRC-QUISITC: fl€ 
3341 or equivalent. 



A€ 4431 Aerothermodunamics & Design of Turbo- 
mochines (3-3). 

flow and energy exchange in compressors and tur- 
bines, and current engineering methods for their 
aerodynamic design, test, and measurement. Pfl€- 
R6QUISIT6: Aero Preparatory Phase or equivalent. 



A€ 4452 Rocket and Missile Propulsion (4-0). 
Applications and analysis of solid-propellant rock- 
ets, ramjets and ducted rockets. Propellant selec- 
tion criteria and characteristics, combustion models 
and behavior, performance analysis, technology 
requirements. PR6A6QUISITC-: A€ 3451. 



A€ 4502 High-Speed Aerodynamics (4-0). 
Nonlinear and linearized analysis of inviscid sub- 
sonic and supersonic flow over wings and bodies. 
Steady and unsteady phenomena. Method of char- 
acteristics. Method of distributed singularities. 
Computer solution of typical problems. If class pro- 
gress warrants, instructor may elect to present ad- 
ditional topics on transonic flow. PR6R6QUISIT6: AC 
3501. 



as nonlinear aerodynamic effects, coupling effects, 
Magnus effects, etc. The impact of these effects on 
missile flight dynamics, guidance and control is in- 
cluded. PRCRCQUISITC: fl€ 3501. 



A€ 4504 Convective Heat and Mass Transfer (4-0). 
Convective heat and mass transfer on internal and 
external flow systems common to aerospace vehi- 
cles; laminar and turbulent flows. Analytic tech- 
niques, integral and numerical methods, exper- 
imental correlations, effects of variations in thermo- 
physical properties. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 3501. 



A€ 4505 Laser/ Particle Beam Technology (3-2). 
Survey of different types of particle beams, includ- 
ing electrical, gasdynamic and chemical lasers, 
electron beams; resonator cavities for lasers and 
external propagation mechanisms,- high energy 
lasers and charged particle beams, military appli- 
cations. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Instructor. 



A€ 4506 Rarefied Gas Dynamics (4-0). 
Topics include kinetic theory, distribution functions, 
Boltzmann equation, transport phenomena from a 
kineti« theory viewpoint, free molecular flow, transi- 
tional flow between continuum and free molecular 
flow, dynamic coefficient and numerical solutions. 
PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Instructor. 



A€ 4632 Computer Methods in Aeronautics (3-2). 
Use of the digital computer in numerical methods. 
Classification of Aeronautical engineering problems 
as equilibrium, eigenvalue or propagation prob- 
lems. Computer solution procedures developed for 
the ordinary and partial differential equations of 
gas dynamics, heat transfer, flight mechanics and 
structures. PRCRCQUISITC: flero Preparatory Phase 
or equivalent. 



A€ 4641 Aeronautical Data Systems (3-2). 
fl design-project-oriented course utilizing micro- 
processor technology with emphasis upon aero- 
nautical engineering applications. Both software 
and hardware aspects of system integration will be 
considered for engineering tradeoffs during prob- 
lem definition and solution. PRCRCQUISITC: 66 281 1 
or equivalent. 



A€ 4702 Missile Propulsion (4-0). 

(See UJeapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



4503 Missile Aerodynamics (4-0). 
The aerodynamics of missiles and guided projec- 
tiles for various speed regimes and motions. Topics 
include slender body and linearized theory as well 



A€ 4703 Missile Stability and Performance (4-1 ). 

(See UJeapons engineering and Space Science 
Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



116 



FKRONRUTICS 



A€ 4704 Missile Configuration ond Design (3-2). 
(See Weapons 6ngineering and Space Science 
Course listing at the end of this listing.) 

fl€ 4706 High Cnergy Loser System Design (4-0). 
(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 
Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



A€ 4712 Missile Systems Design ond Integration 

(3-2). 

(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



A€ 4791 Spacecraft Systems I (3-2). 

(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



A€ 3705 Rir Defense Lethality (4-1). 
This course examines the design and effectiveness 
of antiaircraft guns and missiles, both surface 
based and airborne. The techniques and proce- 
dures for target detection, target tracking, and 
propagator flyout (both guided and ballistic) are 
presented and quantified. Target signatures for 
radar, IR, and visually directed systems are ex- 
amined. The types of uuarheads and fuzes on small 
arms, antiaircraft artillery, and guided missiles 
are presented. The vulnerability of the target to the 
damage mechanisms is examined, and the proce- 
dures for assessing the measures of target vulner- 
ability are described. Total system lethality is eval- 
uated by determining the probability of target kill 
given a single shot and given an encounter. Coun- 
termeasures used by the target for reducing the 
air defense lethality are also described 



fi€ 4792 Spacecraft Systems II (4-0). 

(See UUeapons engineering and Space Science 

Course listing at the end of this listing.) 



fl€ 4900 Advanced Study in Aeronautics (Variable 
credit up to five hours.) 

Directed graduate study or laboratory research. 
Course may be repeated for additional credit if top- 
ic changes. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Department 
Chairman. 



R€ 3711 Missile Flight Analysis (4-0). 
Methodology, with numerical examples, for assess- 
ing the capabilities/limitations dictated by aero- 
dynamic shapes and propulsion systems on tactical 
missile trajectories, at high (surface-air, air-air, etc.) 
and low (cruise missile) thrust-to-weight. Rft-tail or 
canard, single or dual symmetry configurations. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: Completion of an Cngineering/Sci- 
ence Core or equivalent. 



Graduate Courses 



W€ftPONS €NGIN€€RING 

and 
SPflC€ SCI€NC€ COURS6S 

Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

A€ 3001, Space Systems Laboratory (0-2). 
The laboratory will be used to support the Naval 
Postgraduate School (NPS) experiments to be 
flown on board Space Shuttle or on other Space- 
craft. The laboratory does not consist of canned 
experiments; the specific activity depends on the 
nature of the experiment currently being prepared 
for flight. Course may be repeated for additional 
credit to continue work on the project. PRCR6QUI- 
SIT6: Consent of Instructor. 



A€ 4702 Missile Propulsion (4-0). 
Applications and analysis of solid propellent rock- 
ets, ramjets and ducted rockets. Propellant selec- 
tion criteria ond characteristics, combustion models 
ond behavior, performance analysis, technology 
requirements. PR6R6QUISITC: R€ 3701. 

A€ 4703 Missile Stability and Performance (4-1 ). 

Static and dynamic stability and control. Neutral 
points, control effectiveness, trim in maneuvering 
flight. Configuration determinants (canard, aft-con- 
trol; interior arrangement). Transient (dynamic^ 
modes. Subsonic, transonic, supersonic force and 
moment dc.to for performance calculations with 
short and long-range cruciform missiles and cruise 
missiles: acceleration, climb, ceiling, range and agil- 
ity in maneuvering trajectories. PR6R6QUISIT6: RC 
3701. 



A€ 3701 Missile Aerodynamics (4-1). 
Potential flow, thin-airfoil and finite wing theories. 
Linearized equations, Rckeret theory, Prandtl- 
Glauert transformations for subsonic and super- 
sonic wings. Planform effects. Flow about slender 
bodies of revolution, viscous crossflow theory. PRC- 
R6QUISIT6: R€ 2043. 



A€ 4704 Missile Configuration and Design (3-2). 
R project oriented course centering on the design 
of a missile by each student. Principles of aerody- 
namics, guidance, control, propulsion, ond struc- 
tures will be used to synthesize a missile to re- 
spond to a specified threat PR6RCQUISIT6: RC 
4702 and R€ 4703 or completion of the Rero Grad- 
uate Core. 



117 



fl€RONRUTICS 



R€ 4706 High Cncrgy loser System Design (4-0). 
Types of lasers including excimer lasers. Laser per- 
formance. Adaptive optics. Propagation of loser 
beams. Pointing and tracking. Acquisition and 
hondoff. fire control. Damage mechanisms. Advan- 
tages and limitations of both CLU and Pulsed. Appli- 
cations include ASMD, SAM-suppression, anti-tank 
optics, and space uuarfare. High energy laser sys- 
tems ore contrasted with other directed energy 
concepts. Students design a complete laser sys- 
tem. PRCRCQUISITC: Completion of an engineering/ 
Science Core or equivalent. 

fl€ 4712 Missile Systems Design and Integration 

(3-2). 

Propulsion technology assessment of airbreathers 
and rockets. Boost, midcourse, terminal guidance 
and control concepts. Homing guidance law kine- 
matics; target tracker performance. Missile dynam- 
ics. Mission profiles,- trajectory shaping. LUarhead 
lethality. Airframe structural features. Body/wing 
aerodynamic design precepts. Synthesis of above 
to baseline missile definition. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 
3711. 



fl€ 4791 Spacecraft Systems I (3-2). 
examination of the factors affecting space systems 
selection and design, impact of orbital and sensor 
characteristics, ground facilities requirements, 
manufacturing, testing and verification techniques 
and requirements. Payload design considerations 
including impact of antennas, RF environment and 
CMI. Mechanical and electrical design of space sys- 
tems. Temperature control. Attitude control. Special 
techniques associated with large space structures. 
PRCRCQUISITCS: PH 31 1 1 , Completion of Space Cur- 
ricula Core or equivalent. SCCRCT clearance. 



AC 4792 Spacecraft Systems II (4-0). 
Survivability of space systems in wartime is dis- 
cussed along with design features to improve pro- 
tection. Case studies are selected to emphasize 
and illustrate material presented previously in 
AC 4791 as well as material in AC 4792. The stu- 
dents design a space system to meet mission re- 
quirements. PRCRCQUISITC: AC 4792. SCCRCT 
clearance. 




118 



HNTISUBMflRINe WARFAR6 



fiNTISUBMf»RIN€ WflRFflR€ fiCflD€MIC GROUP 



Chairman: 

R. Neagle Forrest, Professor, 

Code 71, Sponogel Hall. Room 202, 

(408) 646-2653, RV 878-2653. 

The Rntisubmorine Warfare Rcademic 
Group is an interdisciplinary association of 
faculty, consisting of ten members represent- 
ing seven separate academic disciplines, fln 
academic group is a less formal organization 
than an academic department, and each pro- 
fessor in the group has an appointment in an 
academic department. The Rntisubmorine 
UJarfare Rcademic Group has administrative 
responsibility for the academic content of the 
Rntisubmorine UJarfare Program of Study. 
Teaching in this multidisciplinary program is 
carried out by faculty members attached to 
the following academic departments: Admin- 
istrative Science, €lectrical and Computer en- 
gineering, Mathematics, National Security 
Rffairs, Oceanography, Operations Research, 
and Physics. Thesis topics for students in this 
area of study are approved by the group and 
the final thesis is approved by the Chairman. 

MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN SVST6MS T€CHNOLOGV 

The degree of Master of Science in Systems 
Technology (Rntisubmorine UJarfare) will be 
awarded at the completion of an interdisci- 
plinary program carried out in accordance 
with the following degree requirements: 

The Master of Science in Systems Technol- 
ogy requires a minimum of 45 quarter hours of 
graduate level work of which at least 1 5 
hours must represent courses at the 4000 lev- 
el. Graduate courses in at least four disci- 



plines must be included and in three disci- 
plines, a course at the 4000 level must be in- 
cluded. 

Rn approved sequence of at least three 
courses constituting advanced specialization 
in option area must be included. 

In addition to the 45 hours of course credit, 
an acceptable group project or thesis must be 
completed. 

The entire program must be approved by 
the Chairman of the RSUU Group. 

COURS€ OFFERINGS 

ST 0001 Seminar (0-1 ). 

Special Lectures, and discussion of matters related 
to the RSUJ Program. PR6RCQUISIT6: Enrollment in 
the RSUJ Curriculum and S6CRC-T clearance. 

ST 0810 Thesis Research /Group Project (0-0). 
Students in the RSUU Curriculum will enroll in this 
course while doing either an individual thesis or an 
equivalent group project involving several students 
and faculty. 

Upper Division or Graduate Course 

ST 3000 Study Project On flSUU Systems Perfor- 
mance (0-2). 

This is a project course in which the project is a 
study and analysis of the performance of an as- 
signed type of RSUJ system under a variety of op- 
erating conditions. PR€R€QUISIT€: enrollment in the 
RSUJ Curriculum or consent of the Group Chairman 
and SCCRCT clearance. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis 
only. 

Graduate Course 

ST 4999 Special Studies in flSUU (1-0) to 4-0). 
R course designed to meet the needs of students 
for special worts in advanced topics related to RSUJ. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: enrollment in the RSUJ Curriculum 
and consent of the Group Chairman. 



119 



C3 



COMMAND, CONTROL & COMMUNICATIONS (C3) 
flCRDCMIC GROUP 



Chairman: 

Michael G. Sovereign, Professor, 

Code 74, Spanagel Hall, Room 203. 

(408) 646-2618, flV 878-2618. 
Associate Chairman: 

Carl R. Jones, Professor, 

Code 54Js, Ingersoll Hall, Room 248, 

(408) 646-2767, RV 878-2767. 

The Command, Control and Communica- 
tions (C3) Rcademic Group is an interdisci- 
plinary association of faculty, consisting of 
fifteen members representing six separate 
academic disciplines. Rn academic group is a 
less formal organization than an academic 
department, and each professor in the group 
has an appointment in an academic depart- 
ment. The C3 Rcademic Group has adminis- 
trative responsibility for the academic con- 
tent of the Joint Command, Control and Com- 
munications Program of Study. Teaching in 
this multidisciplinary program is carried out 
by faculty members attached to the following 
academic departments: Rdministrative Sci- 
ences, Computer Science, electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering, Mathematics, Meteorol- 
ogy, and Operations Research. Thesis topics 
for students in this area of study ore ap- 
proved by the group and the final thesis is 
approved by the Chairman. 

MflSTCR OF SCI€NC€ IN 

SVSTCMS TCCHNOLOGV 

The degree of Master of Science in Systems 
Technology (Command, Control & Communi- 
cations) will be awarded at the completion 
of an interdisciplinary program carried out in 
accordance with the following degree re- 
quirements: 

The Master of Science in Systems Technol- 
ogy (Command, Control & Communications) 
requires a minimum of 45 quarter hours of 
graduate level work in four different academ- 
ic disciplines, of which at least 1 5 hours must 
represent courses at the 4000 level in at 
least two of the disciplines. UUithin the course 
program there must be a specialization se- 
quence consisting of at least three courses. 

In addition to the 45 hours of course credit, 
an acceptable thesis must be completed. 

The Program must be approved by the 
Chairman of the Command, Control and Com- 



120 



munications Rcademic Group. 

GROUP COUftSC OFF6RINGS 

CC 0001 Seminar (0-1). 

Special lectures and discussion of matters related 

to the C3 program. 

CC 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

6veru student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

CC 3505 C3I Architecture (4-0). 
This course supports the C3, Space Operations, and 
Intelligence Curricula by providing an overview of 
the principles, concepts, and trade-offs underlying 
all C3I architectures. Students address alternative 
models of C3! architecture, and then examine the 
attributes of a variety of current and proposed C3I 
architectures. In a class project, students assess 
the probability that a current or proposed C3I arch- 
itecture can satisfy a measure of effectiveness of 
their choice. PR6R6QUISIT6S: fl 3000-level Opera- 
tions Research survey course or permission of the 
instructor. TOP S6CR6T clearance with access to 
SP€C!Rl INTCLUG6NC6 information. 
Graduate Courses 
CC 41 13 Policies and Problems in C3(5-0). 
Rn in-depth study of the fundamental role C3 sys- 
tems fulfill in operational military situations, includ- 
ing crisis warning and crisis management. Rn anal- 
ysis of the changing role of intermediate level 
headquarters and its impact on C3 system require- 
ments and design. Additionally, the course consid- 
ers the complexities imposed on C3 systems os the 
force structure becomes more heterogeneous, as in 
the case of NRTO. Case study of selected incidents 
and systems. Specifically for students in the C3 cur- 
riculum. PR€R€QUISIT€S: CO 31 1 1, NS 3064. 
CC 4200 Combat Systems engineering (4-0). 
This course examines the generation of combat 
system requirements and the relationships be- 
tween operational, financial planning, and techni- 
cal communities in fielding a combat system that 
fulfills those requirements. The contribution of the 
technical disciplines to the statement and solution 
of decision problems in design, priority setting, and 
scheduling are explored through the use of current- 
ly outstanding issues. PRCR6QUISIT6S: Consent of 
the Instructor, Basic probability and statistics, 4th 
quarter standing. Secret Clearance. Graded on a 
Pass/Fail basis only. 

CC 4900 Special Topics in Command Control and 
Communications (2-0 to 5-0). 
Supervised study in selected areas of command 
control and communications to meet the needs of 
individual students. May be repeated for credit if 
course content changes. PR6R6QUISIT6: Consent of 
Group Chairman. Graded on a Pass/Foil basis only. 



COMPUT€R SCI6NC6 



D€PflRTM€NT OF COMPUT6R SCI€NC€ 



Chairman: 

Vincent V. Lum, Professor, 

Code 52, Sponogel Hall, Room 513, 

(408) 646-2449, RV 878-2449 

Associate Chairmen: 

Gordon H. Bradley, Professor, 

Code 52Bz, Sponogel Hall, Room 514, 

(408) 646-2359, RV 878-2359. 

Uno R. Kodres, Professor, 

Code 52Kr, Sponagel Hall, Room 534, 

(408) 646-2197, RV 878-2197. 

The Department of Computer Science pro- 
vides graduate training and education in ma- 
jor areas of computer science. Thus, both ba- 
sic and advanced graduate courses are of- 
fered. However, to bring our officer-students 
up to speed, a preparatory phase of some 
specially-tailored courses is provided for the 
new students. These basic and advanced 
courses lead to either a degree in Master of 
Science or Doctor of Philosophy. The require- 
ments to complete either program are rigor- 
ous ond are comparable to those set up in 
other major universities. 

MRST6R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN COMPUT€R SCI€NC€ 

The degree of Master of Science in Comput- 
er Science will be awarded upon the satisfac- 
tory completion of a program, approved by 
the Chairman, Computer Science Department, 
which satisfies, as a minimum, the following 
degree requirements: 

a. Rt least 40 quarter hours of graduate- 
level work of which at least 1 2 quarter hours 
must be at the 4000 level. 

b. The Program shall include at least: 

28 quarter hours in Computer Science 
1 2 quarter hours in the other disciplines 

c. Completion of on approved sequence of 
courses constituting specialization in on area 
of Computer Science. 

d. Completion of an acceptable thesis in 
addition to the 40 quarter hours of course 
work. 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
IN COMPUT€R SCI€NC€ 

The Department of Computer Science has a 
program leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. Rreas of special strength in the 
department are data-base systems, soft- 
ware engineering, and systems architecture. 
Minors in areas of other departments are 
possible. R noteworthy feature of these 
areas of research is that the candidate's re- 
search may be conducted off-campus in the 
candidate's sponsoring laboratory or unit of 
the federal government. The degree require- 
ments are as outlined under the general 
school requirements for the Doctor's degree. 



COMPUTING FRCIUT16S 

The facilities of the UU.R. Church Computer 
Center provides school-wide timesharing and 
batch processing for Computer Science class- 
room instruction and research. The Center has 
on IBM 3033 Rttoched Processor with 16 
megabytes of memory. The system has an 
IBM 3850 Mass Store that can hold 38 billion 
bytes of information. The system supports a 
wide variety of languages, ond applications 
programs. Timesharing service is provided 
8 terminal/printer locations across the cam- 
pus. 

In addition to the campus computing center 
which provides main-frame computing ser- 
vices to the whole school, the Computer Sci- 
ence Department's computing facilities pro- 
vide students and faculty with access to minis 
and micros for teaching, thesis work and re- 
search.. These facilities are composed of a 
general-purpose laboratory and several in- 
dividual laboratories for main stream com- 
puter science areas. Further, these labora- 
tories have their computers interconnected 
via local-area networks. Currently the six indi- 
vidual laboratories are Database systems, 
Graphics and Video, Software engineering, 
Artificial Intelligence, System Architecture, 
and Microcomputers. 

The variety of hardware and software ex- 
isting in the department is rather large. Cur- 
rently the computers in the Department in- 



121 



COMPUT6R SCI6NC6 



dude two VAX 1 1/780's. one VAX 1 1/750, 
two PDP 1 1 /50's. two PDP 1 1 /44's, one PDP 
1 1 /34, ond nearly o hundred microcomputers 
of different kinds. We hove o large number of 
terminals, disks, image processors, and other 
devices. The Department also possesses 
three very advanced graphic (IRIS) work- 
stations and eight intelligent (ISI) work- 
stations. Further, the department is in the 
second year of a three year $800,000 pro- 
gram to upgrade its instructional laborator- 
ies. Substantial number of additional hard- 
ware and computers have been ordered. 

Via the local-area networks, all other lab- 
oratories are connected to the General lab- 
oratory which in turn provides gateways to 
the MILNCT, ARPANET and CSN6T. This inter- 
connection allows us to communicate easily 
within the Department and without the 
School. 

On the software side, the major operating 
systems in the Department are Berkeley UNIX 
and D€C VMS. The languages supported in 
the systems include C, Lisp, Prolog, as well as 
the normal ones like Ada, Pascal and Fortran- 
77. Commercial versions of Ingres and Oracle 
database systems have been installed. 

Naturally, support for the Department's 
teaching and research is not complete with 
only hardware and software. We must have 
high-quality professional support as well. Cur- 
rently the Department has 9 qualified hard- 
ware/software, full-time professionals who 
oversee the operation of these various 
equipments. They work closely with the facul- 
ty and students in support of teaching and re- 
search. 



R€S€RRCH IRBORRTORICS 

The computing equipments of the research 
laboratories are purchased by various re- 
search projects with external funds. They are 
dedicated to the NPS students and faculty for 
the thesis development and faculty research. 
There are six research laboratories in the 
Computer Science Department. The laborator- 
ies and the computer equipment are listed as 
follows: 

Laboratory for Database Systems Re- 
search 



(DCC PDP 1 l/44s, DCC's parallel communi- 
cations link to VAX 1 1/780, printers and 
terminals; ISI workstations, Cthernet links 
to VAX 1 1/750; MicroVAX-lls, DCCnet con- 
nection to VAX 11/780.) 

Laboratory for Computer Graphics 
(IRIS-2400 graphics workstations with bit- 
map display memory, high-resolution color 
monitor, digitizer tablet ond mouse, Cther- 
net link to VAX 11/780.) 

Laboratory for Software engineering Re- 
search 

(Apple Macintoshes with extend memory, 
microfloppy and fixed disks, Apple Image- 
writer and LaserWriter, 300/1200 baud 
modems for remote access; IW DT20 (IBM- 
PC/AT compatible) with Intel 80287 math 
co-processors, color monitors, Okidata 
Microline 193 text and graphic printers.) 

Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence 
(Tektronic 4404 and 4406 Artificial Intelli- 
gence systems with extended memory, 
color graphics copiers, dotmatrix printers, 
streamer tape drive and fixed disks.) 

Laboratory For Computer engineering and 

Combat Systems 

(Intel iSBC 86/12 single-board computers, 

RAM, bubble memories, disk drives, Intel's 

MULTIBUS and Ethernet; GCMINI multi-level 

trusted system; INMOS multitransputer 

systems.) 

Laboratory for Microcomputer Systems 
(Zl 00 microcomputers with lntel-8085 and 
lntel-8088 processors, color monitors, 
Daisy wheel and high-speed printers; Intel 
86/1 2A single-board computer with serial 
interface and Ethernet controller.) 

D€PRRTM€NTRl 
COURS€ OFFERINGS 

CS0001 Seminar (0-1). 

Special or guest lecturers. 

CS 0002 Seminar (0-1). 

This seminar is open to new students only. It is lec- 
tured by the Chairman of the Department and of- 
fered every Fall and Spring. 

CS 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

Cvery student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 



122 



COMPUTER SCI6NC6 



CS 2000 fln Introduction to Computer Systems 

(3-1). 

Primarily designed for computer science majors, this 
course provides a comprehensive introduction to 
computer systems in terms of their major building 
blocks and their interactions for the purpose of ty- 
ing all the other concurrent and subsequent com- 
puter science courses together. The emphasis of 
the course are on fundamentals, technical issues, 
conceptual entities and their relationships in a com- 
puter system environment. There are no program- 
ming assignments. NO PR6R6QUISIT6. 

Upper Division Courses 
CS 2010 Introduction to Computer Systems (For 
Non-Majors) (2-0). 

fin introduction to the general characteristics of 
contemporary computers and to the functions they 
serve in a diversity of organizations is provided. 
The capabilities and limitations of computing as 
well as the economics of data processing in gen- 
eral are emphasized. There are no prerequisite or 
co-requisite courses. Prior computing experience is 
not assumed and programming is not taught. 
CS 2106 Introduction to Programming in FORTRAN 
(1-2). 

The course is an introduction to programming using 
FORTRAN. The course is intended for management 
students with no previous programming experience 
who ore already familiar with computer fundamen- 
tals. PRCRCQUISITC: CS 201 or consent of Instruc- 
tor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 
CS 2450 Computer Programming with FORTRAN 
(3-1). 

This course provides an overview of the computer 
system: hardware, software, and the operating 
system. Algorithms and programs are developed 
using a structured approach to stepwise refine- 
ment of the algorithms and programs. The design 
and testing of computer programs in FORTRAN are 
studied, and practiced by the student in the labora- 
tory. Computer projects of increasing difficulty are 
assigned. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 
CS 2850 PL/1 Programming Laboratory (0-2). 
Introduction to programming in PL/1 for students 
with previous experience with computer problem 
solving with structured programming in a high order 
computer language. Computer projects of increas- 
ing difficulty ore assigned. PR6RCQUISIT6S: CS 2950 
or CS2970. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 
CS 2950 Structured Programming with FORTRAN 
(5-0). 

An introduction to computer algorithms, programs 
and hardware. Algorithms and programs are devel- 
oped using a structured approach to stepwise 
refinement of the algorithms and programs. The 
design and testing of computer programs in 
FORTRAN are studied, and practiced by the student 
in the laboratory. Computer projects of increasing 
difficulty are assigned. Computer systems including 
data representation, computer organization, and 
systems software are introduced. 



CS 2960 Structured Programming with PL/I (5-0). 
An introduction to computer algorithms programs 
and hardware. Algorithms and programs are devel- 
oped using a structured approach to stepwise re- 
finement of the algorithms and programs. The de- 
sign and testing of computer programs in PL/1 are 
studied, and practiced by the student in the labo- 
ratory. Computer projects of increasing difficulty are 
assigned. Computer systems topics including data 
representation, computer organization, and sys- 
tems software are introduced. 

CS 2970 Structured Programming with PASCAL 

(5-0). 

An introduction to computer algorithms programs 
and hardware. Algorithms and programs are devel- 
oped using a structured approach to stepwise re- 
finement of the algorithms and programs. The de- 
sign and testing of computer programs in PASCAL 
are studied, and practiced by the student in the 
laboratory. Computer projects of increasing diffi- 
culty are assigned. Computer systems topics includ- 
ing data representation, computer organization, 
and systems software are introduced. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

CS 3010 Computing Devices and Systems (4-0). 
Designed primarily for non-computer science majors, 
this course examines functional components and 
their organization as a computer system. Although 
emphasis is upon computer hardware, the impor- 
tance of both hardware and software in constitut- 
ing a computer system is discussed. Important in- 
stances of software-hardware trade-offs in the 
implementation of various components are discus- 
sed. In this course, computer systems are examined 
through a hierarchy of four levels: The electronic cir- 
cuit level, the logic or digital device level, the pro- 
gramming level, and the systems level. Major 
emphasis is upon the higher levels (programming 
and systems). PR6RCQUISITC: CS 2450 or CS 2960 
or CS 2970 or consent of Instructor. 

CS 3020 Software Design (3-2). 
This course will provide the student with a broad 
background in the concept, design, implementation 
and testing of computer programs. The topics will 
include identification of program requirements, 
language selection, design methodology, program 
efficiency, test and debug practices, and documen- 



123 



COMPUTER SCI€NC€ 



CS 3030 Opcroting Systems Structures (4-0). 
Designed primarily for non-computer science ma- 
jors, this course will provide a broad overview of 
operating systems including memory management 
techniques, job scheduling, processor scheduling, 
device management and data (information) man- 
agement techniques. Case studies will be included 
to illustrate the issues in manager-operating sys- 
tem interfaces, operating system selection, data 
control and security, and operating system utility 
support. In addition, future trends in computers will 
be identified, including maxi, mini, and microcom- 
puters. PR6RCQUISITC-S: CS 3010 or equivalent 
background and consent of Instructor. 

CS 3111 Principles of Programming Languages 

(4-0). 

This course is an introduction to the design, evalua- 
tion and implementation of programming lan- 
guages. The four themes of name, data, control, 
and syntactic structuring are traced through the five 
major programming language generations. Princi- 
ples for the evaluation of languages are devel- 
oped and investigated. Key implementation con- 
cepts are covered, including interpreters and run- 
time organization. PRCRCQUISITCS: CS 2450 or CS 
2960 or CS 2970 or consent of Instructor. 

CS 31 13 Introduction to Compiler Writing (3-2). 
This course is intended to explore the basics of 
modern compiler design and construction tech- 
niques. The fundamentals of scanning, parsing and 
compiler semantics are developed in the frame- 
work of modern compiler-compiler and translator- 
writing system technology. The laboratory periods 
will be used to develop a small model compiler/as- 
sembler. PR6R6QUISITCS: CS 3111 and CS 3300 or 
consent of instructor. 

CS 3200 Introduction to Computer Architecture 
(3-2). 

This course examines the organization of comput- 
ers, processor architectures, machine and assembly 
language programming. Microcomputer systems 
are used in the laboratory to give students hands- 
on experience. Included are hardware components: 
the processor, memories, serial I/O, parallel I/O, 
real time clock, interrupt control, DMA; processor 
instructions: information transfer, arithmetic, con- 
trol, process switching,- machine language and 
assembly language programming: arithmetic func- 
tions, input/output, interrupt handling, multicom- 
puter control. PRCRCQUISITCS: CS 2970 and either 
€C 2810 or equivalent. 



systems are used in the laboratory to give stu- 
dents hands-on experience. Included are hardware 
components: the processor, memories, serial I/O, 
parallel I/O, real time clock, interrupt control, DMA; 
processor instructions: information transfer, arith- 
metic, control, machine language and assembly 
language programming: arithmetic functions, 
input/ output, interrupt handling. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 
CS 2450 or CS 2960 and 6C 2810 or equivalent. 

CS 3300 Data Structures (3-1 ). 
The course deals with the specification, implemen- 
tation and analysis of data structures. Common 
data objects such as strings, arrays, records, linear 
lists and trees, together with the operations used 
to manipulate these objects are studied. Particular 
emphasis is placed on linked structures. Implemen- 
tation of symbol tables by hash tables and other 
means is presented. Applications to memory man- 
agement, compiler design and sorting /search- 
ing algorithms are given. Computer projects in a 
high-level language are required. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 
CS 2970 or consent of Instructor. 

CS 3310 Artificial Intelligence (4-0). 
Survey of topics and methods of Artificial Intelli- 
gence. Topics include simple learning tasks, visual 
scene analysis and descriptions, understanding of 
natural language, computer game playing, knowl- 
edge engineering systems. Methods include heu- 
ristic search and exploitation of natural constraints, 
means-ends analysis, production systems, seman- 
tic networks, and frames. Cmphasis is placed on 
solving problems which seem to require intelli- 
gence rather than attempting to stimulate or study 
natural intelligence. Class and individual projects to 
illustrate basic concepts ore assigned. PA6RCQUI- 
SIT6: MA 01 25 or MA 2025 or consent of Instructor. 

CS 3400 Comparative Computer Architecture (4-0). 
This course examines the fundamental concepts of 
computer architectural design. A definition of com- 
puter architecture and organization, the history and 
evolution of computers, and architectural descrip- 
tive languages are presented. Initially, the designs 
of functional architectural components, to include 
ALU's, control units, memory hierarchies and input- 
output organizations, are examined. Important 
instances of software-hardware tradeoffs in such 
designs are discussed. Basic approaches to en- 
hancing computer performance are discussed. 
Representative computer class architectures are 
examined and compared. PR6RC-QUISIT6: CS 3200 
or CS 3201 or consent of Instructor. 



CS 3201 Introduction to Computer Organization for 
Non-majors (3-2). 

Designed primarily for weapons and electronic wor- 
fare majors, this course examines the organization 
of computers, processor architecture, machine and 
assembly language programming. Microprocessor 



CS 3450 Software System Design (3-1 ). 

This course covers the design and implementation 
of software system elements, including assem- 
blers, loaders, input/output control sub-systems, 
and interpreters. PR6RCQUISIT6S: CS 3200, CS 3300 
and CS 31 1 1 or consent of Instructor. 



124 



COMPUT6R SCI6NC6 



CS 3460 Software Methodology (3-1 ). 
Methods for the design, implementation and test- 
ing of computer softuuare. Stepwise refinement, 
decomposition, information hiding, program style, 
debugging, testing and informal verification. Sev- 
eral program designs will be investigated by 
means of code reading, program modification and 
writing software. PR6R6QUISIT6S: CS 31 1 1 and CS 
3300. 

CS 3502 Computer Communications and Networks 

(4-0). 

An introduction to the structure and architecture of 
computer networks. Topics covered include net- 
work topology, single and multiple server queueing 
models, link establishment and link operation pro- 
tocols, local area networks, packet radio networks, 
and point-to-point networks. The ISO model and 
the ARPfl, ALOHfl and CTH6RN6T systems are stud- 
ied. Term papers and/or projects will be an impor- 
tant aspect of the course. PR6RCQUISIT6S: CS 3200 
or CS 301 (or equivalent) and Mfl 2300 (or equiv- 
alent). 

CS 3550 Computers in Combat Systems (3-2). 
This course describes the functions and algorithms 
of combat systems, the human interaction, and the 
systems organization in terms of processes. The 
laboratory experience includes work with naviga- 
tional, tracking and ballistics functions, display con- 
trol and the use of wakeup and block primitives in 
process control. Real-time performance analysis 
and prediction using simulations is included. PR€- 
R6QUISITC: CS 3200 or CS 3201 or equivalent. 

CS 3601 Theory of Formal Languages and Auto- 
mata (4-0). 

This course will cover the Chomsky hierarchy of For- 
mal Languages (regular sets, context-free lan- 
guages, context-sensitive languages, and recur- 
sively enumerable languages) and the types of 
grammars and automata associated with each 
class in the hierarchy. Cmphasis is placed on the 
major results of the theory as they relate to lan- 
guage and compiler design. In addition, the major 
results involving the concept of undecidability are 
covered. PRCRCQUISITC-S: Mfl 2025 and Mfl 3026 or 
equivalent. 

CS 3650 Theory of Algorithms (4-0). 
This course focuses on the design and analysis of 
efficient algorithms. Techniques for analyzing algo- 
rithms in order to measure their efficiency are pre- 
sented. Control structure abstractions, such as di- 
vide and conquer, greedy, dynamic programming, 
backtrack (branch and bound), and local search 
methods, are studied. The theory of NP-complete- 
ness is presented along with current approaches to 
NP-hard problems. PR6RCQUISIT6: CS 3300 and CS 
3601. 



CS 3800 Directed Study in Computer Sa'ences 
(0-2 to 0-8). 

Individual research and study by the student under 
the supervision of a member of the faculty. In- 
tended primarily to permit interested students to 
pursue in depth subjects not fully covered in formal 
class work. PR6R6QUISITC: Consent of Instructor. 
Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 

CS 3900 Selected Topics in Computer Sdence (3-0 ). 
Presentation of a wide selection of topics from cur- 
rent literature. Lectures on subjects of current inter- 
est and exploration may be presented by invited 
guests from other universities, government labora- 
tories, and from industry, as well as by faculty mem- 
bers of the Naval Postgraduate School. Tours of 
other facilities of interest may also be conducted. 
PRC-R6QUISIT6: Consent of Instructor. Graded on 
Pass/Fail basis only. 

Graduate Courses 

CS 41 12 Operating Systems (4-0). 
An in-depth theoretical treatment of operating sys- 
tems concepts. Major course topics include process 
synchronization using semaphores, critical regions, 
and rendezvous, virtural memory including demand 
paging and segmentation, dynamic linking and 
loading, file structures and information security. The 
producer-consumer problem, readers and writers 
problem and the dining philosophers problem are 
examined. Architectural and language implications 
of evolving operating systems are considered. Pfl€- 
R6QUISIT6S: CS 3450 and either CS 31 12 or CS 
3030. 

CS 41 13 Advanced Language Topics (4-0). 
This course covers advanced topics and recent de- 
velopments in programming languages and compil- 
ers. Three major topics are functional programming, 
object-oriented programming and logic program- 
ming. Both the theory and practice of functional 
programming are covered. Theoretical topics in- 
clude the Church-Rosser theorem, the significance 
of various evaluation orders, and the use of recur- 
sive simultaneous equations to define data types. 
Functional, object-oriented and logic programming 
are viewed from the unified perspective of tree 
transformations. PRCRCQUISITCS: CS 311 1 and CS 
3450 or consent of Instructor. 

CS 4150 Programming Tools and environments 

(4-0). 

This course covers the design and implementation 
of tools to aid software development, including 
syntax-directed editors, version-control systems, 
language-oriented debuggers, symbolic execution 
vehicles, programming databases, type checkers, 
and automatic programming tools. These topics are 
discussed in the context of an integrated, lan- 
guage-oriented programming environment. PP,^- 
RCQUISIT6S: CS 3450 and CS 41 13 or consent of 
Instructor. 



125 



COMPUT6R SCI€NC€ 



CS 4202 Computer Graphics (3-2). 
fin introduction to the principles of the hardware 
and the software used in the production of comput- 
er generated images. The focus of the course is a 
major design project utilizing the departmental 
computer graphics and image-processing facilities. 
The course is intended for students proficient in the 
development of software systems. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
CS 2970, CS 3200, CS 3300 or consent of the 
Instructor. 

CS 4203 Interactive Computation Systems (3-2). 
A study of the human-computer interface and meth- 
ods for interactive computer-assisted problem solv- 
ing. Topics include applicable human psychology, 
physiology and cognitive science. The main focus of 
the course is a design project involving computer 
graphics. PR6R6QUISIT6: CS 4202 or consent of the 
instructor. 

CS 4300 Database Systems (3-1 ). 
This course presents an up-to-date introduction to 
database systems including database system 
architectures, physical storage organization, data 
models, data languages, design of databases, 
query optimization, database integrity, security, 
concurrency control and recovery. PRCR6QUISITCS: 
CS 3450 and CS 3300, or consent of Instructor. 

CS 4310 Advanced Artificial Intelligence (4-0). 
Artificial intelligence has seen a rapid growth in 
applications in recent years. This course will survey 
a wide variety of current research, using a seminar 
format. Application areas surveyed include plan- 
ning, language understanding, vision, robotics, 
machine learning, human tutoring, database de- 
sign, and statistics. PRCRC-QUISITCS: CS 331 or con- 
sent of Instructor. 

CS 431 1 Knowledge Based Systems (3-1 ). 
This course covers the design and implementation 
of knowledge-based systems. Topics include ac- 
quiring, representing, and organizing knowledge, 
multiple levels of problem structure and domain 
knowledge, metaknowledge and multilevel control 
structures. These topics will be studied in the con- 
test of several problem-solving, signal understand- 
ing, and natural language understanding tasks. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: CS 33 1 and CS 3450 or consent of 
Instructor. 



CS 4320 Data Base System Design (4-0). 
Primarily designed for non-computer science ma- 
jors, this course explores the design and technol- 
ogy of data base software. Implementation tech- 
niques, viable alternatives, data base philosophy 
data manipulation in complex information environ- 
ments, and system requirements are explored, 
examples of systems will be drawn from active DOD 
data base systems and current application/ re- 
search in the private as well as public sectors. PR€- 
R6QUISIT6: CS 3020 or knowledge of a higher-level 
language and consent of Instructor. 



CS 4322 Advanced Database-Systems Topics 

(3-1). 

This course covers advanced topics and recent de- 
velopments in database systems and machines. 
Three major topics are multi-lingual database sys- 
tems, multi-backend data base systems and data- 
base machines. In addition to theoretical and de- 
sign studies, the experimentation of some ad- 
vanced prototype database systems will be in- 
cluded. PR6R6QUISITCS-. CS 3450 and CS 3300, or 
CS 4300, or consent of Instructor. 

CS 4450 Advanced Computer Architecture (4-0). 
This course covers advanced topics in computer 
architecture and the application of concepts in 
computer architecture to the design and use of 
computers. The topics discussed include classes of 
computer architecture, application oriented arch- 
itecture and high performance architecture. PR6- 
R6QUISITCS: CS 3400 or equivalent. 

CS 4451 Design and Analysis of Multiple-Processor, 
Real-Time Computers (3-1). 
This course covers computer architectures ranging 
from pure multiprocessor to massively parallel sys- 
tems used for real-time applications. Processing 
capacities are analyzed and performance esti- 
mates are made based on various real-time appli- 
cations. Reliability and fault-tolerance issues are 
considered for the multiple-processor systems. 
Application-program complexities are considered 
from the programmer's point of view. Laboratory 
experiments with multiple processor systems will 
be conducted in the microcomputer laboratory. 
PRC-R6QUISITC-S: CS 3200 and CS 3450 or consent of 
Instructor. 



CS 4312 Advanced Database Systems (3-1). 
This course is a sequel to CS 4300, Database Sys- 
tems. The course will provide an in-depth coverage 
of relational database theory, distributed data- 
base systems, semantic data models, query pro- 
cessing and optimization, logic and databases, 
and other advanced topics. Many topics will be 
illustrated using both commercial and prototype 
database systems. PRCR6QUISIT6: CS 4300 or con- 
sent of instructor. 



CS 4470 Advanced Computer Graphics Topics 

(3-2). 

This course covers advanced topics in computer 
image generation. The topics discussed include 
quality and realism in computer images, advanced 
realtime interactive systems, and special architec- 
tures for the real-time generation and display of 
computer images. PRCR6QUISIT6: CS 4202, CS 4203 
and the consent of the Instructor. 



126 



COMPUT6R SCI€NC€ 



CS 4500 Software engineering (4-1 ). 

The techniques for the specification, design, test- 
ing, maintenance and management of large soft- 
ware systems. Specific topics include softuuare life 
cycle planning, cost estimation, requirements defi- 
nition and specification, design, testing and verifi- 
cation, maintenance and reusability. The labora- 
tory sessions will discuss special topics. PRC-RCQ- 
USITC: CS 3460 or CS 3020 or consent of instructor. 

CS 4510 Cognitive Sciences and Computer Pro- 
gramming (3-0). 

This is a seminar on the application of results in the 
cognitive sciences to the study of computer pro- 
gramming. There will be extensive readings cover- 
ing topics in cognitive psychology, software psy- 
chology, selected areas of artificial intelligence 
and programming methodology. Topics covered 
include definition of the programming task, com- 
plexity of programs, understanding of software, 
and tentative models of the programming task. 
PRC-RC-QUISITC-: CS 4500 and the consent of the 
instructor. 

CS 4550 Distributed Computing (4-0). 
The course covers all aspects of computer systems 
that have multiple computers connected by com- 
munications links. Distributed systems architec- 
tures, local area networks, geographically distrib- 
uted network, multiprocessor systems, perfor- 
mance and reliability, distributed operating sys- 
tems and distributed database systems are stud- 
ied. The course also covers distributed computing 
related topics in the areas of programming lan- 
guages, computer science theory and software 
engineering. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: CS 3450 and CS 
3400. 

CS 4600 Topics in Formal Semantics (3-0). 
This course covers advanced topics in the theory of 
formal semantics, as used in formal specifications 
for programming languages, and other areas of 
computer science. The topics discussed include 
specific semantic theories such as denotational 
semantics, axiomatic semantics, operational 
semantics, and current uses of formal semantics in 
the specification of abstract data types and other 
computing resources. PRC-R€QUISIT€: CS 31 1 1 and 
CS 3601 or consent of the instructor. 



CS 4700 €pistemologu for Computer Scientists 

(3-0). 

This is a seminar on the applications of epistemol- 
ogy, the theory of knowledge, to computer science 
problems. There will be a particular emphasis on 
Rrtificial Intelligence applications, especially 
knowledge representation. The course covers the 
major epistemological theories from Plato to the 
present, emphasizing those with a relevance to 
computer science. Other topics discussed include 
logic (deductive and inductive), philosophy of sci- 
ence, foundations of mathematics and the use of 
empirical techniques in computer science. PRCRC-Q- 
UISITC-S: CS 331 and consent of Instructor; CS 431 
or CS 431 1 is also recommended. 



CS 4800 Directed Study in Advanced Computer Sci- 
ence (0-2 to 0-8). 

Directed advanced study in computer science on a 
subject of mutual interest to student and staff 
member. Intended primarily to permit students to 
pursue in depth subjects not fully covered in formal 
class work or thesis research. May be repeated for 
credit with a different topic. PRC-RC-QUISIT6: Consent 
of Instructor. Graded on Pass/fail basis only. 



CS 4900 Research Seminar in Computer Science 

(2-0). 

This course will examine the current and planned 
research of Computer Science faculty in multiple 
fields of study. The course is designed to support 
Computer Science students in their fourth quarter of 
study in the selection of an area/topic of thesis re- 
search. PR6R6QUISITC: Computer Science students 
in fourth quarter or consent of department Chair- 
man. Graded on Pass/ Fail basis only. 



CS 4910 Advanced Readings in Computer Science 
(0-2 to 0-8). 

Directed readings in computer science on a subject 
of mutual interest to student and faculty member. 
The course allows in-depth study of advanced top- 
ics not fully covered in formal class work or thesis 
research. May be repeated for credit with a differ- 
ent topic. PRCR6QUISIT6: Consent of Instructor. 



127 



aeCTRICAl AND COMPUT€R €NGIN€6filNG 



D€PRRTM€NT OF 
€l€C7RICfll RND COMPUT€R €NG!N€€RING 



Chairman: 

Harriett 8. Rigas, Professor, 

Code 62, Spanagel Hall, Room 437, 

(408) 646-2081, flV 878-2081. 

flssoa'ate Chairmen: 

flcodemic Rffairs: 

Robert D. Strum, Professor, 

Code 62St, Spanagel Hall, Room 221 R, 

(408) 646-2652, RV 878-2652. 

Research: 

John P. Poiuers, Professor, 

Code 62Po, Bullard Hall, Room 223, 

(408) 646-2679, RV 878-2679. 



The Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering is the major contributor to pro- 
grams for the education of officers in the elec- 
tronic systems Engineering Curriculum, the 
Communications Engineering Curriculum, and 
the Space Systems Engineering Curriculum. 
Additionally, the Department offers courses 
in support of other curricula such as Electronic 
Warfare Systems Technology; Telecommuni- 
cations Systems Management; Command, 
Control and Communications, Space Systems 
Operations; UJeapons Engineering; Under- 
water Rcoustics; and Engineering Rcoustics. 

The Department offers programs leading 
to the Master of Science degree in Electrical 
Engineering (MSEE), the degree of Electrical 
Engineer (^) and Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D). The school typically graduates 70-75 
MSEE degree candidates, 5 Electrical Engi- 
neer degree recipients, and 1 Ph.D per year. 

R typical MSEE student will spend six to 
twelve months learning or reviewing material 
at a junior or senior level before entering into 
graduate studies. The graduate study por- 
tion of a typical program is about one year in 
duration with a combination of course study 
and thesis work being performed. The thesis 
portion of the study is the equivalent of four 
courses with an acceptable written thesis be- 
ing a requirement for graduation. 



The curriculum is organized to provide the 
students with course work spanning the 
breadth of Electrical and Computer Engineer- 
ing. Students are required to take at least 
one graduate level course in each of the fol- 
lowing areas: Signal Processing; Communica- 
tions; Electromagnetics; and Computers. In 
addition to the core requirements students 
concentrate in one major area of Electrical 
and Computer Engineering by taking a 
planned sequence of advanced courses. Cur- 
rently there are formal concentrations in: 

Communications Systems 
Guidance, Navigation, and Controls 

Systems 
Computer Systems 
Signal Processing 

The program leading to the MSEE is accred- 
ited as an Electrical Engineering Program at 
the advanced level by the Engineering Ac- 
creditation Commission of the Rccrediation 
Soard for Engineering and Technology. 



The department has about forty faculty 
members either on a permanent or visiting 
basis and contributing to the instructional 
and research programs. 

MflSTCR OF SCi€NC€ 
IN €l€CTRKfll €NGIN€€RING 

R Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineer- 
ing or its equivalent is required. Credits 
earned at the Naval Postgraduate School 
and credits from the validation of appropriate 
courses at other institutions are combined to 
achieve the degree equivalence. 

To complete the course requirements for 
the Master's Degree, a student needs a min- 
imum of 36 credits in the course sequence 
3000 - 4999 of which at least 27 credits must 
be in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 
Specific courses may be required by the De- 
partment and at least four courses, which to- 
tal a minimum of 1 5 credits, must be in the 
course sequence 4000-4999. 

Rn acceptable thesis must be presented 
and approved by the Department. 



128 



ELECTRICAL RND COMPUTER ENGINEERING 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN €NGIN€€RING SCI€NC€ 

Students with acceptable academic back- 
grounds may enter a program leading to the 
degree Master of Science in €ngineering Sci- 
ence. The program of each student seeking 
this degree is to include at least 36 credit 
hours in the course sequence 3000 - 4999 in 
the disciplines of engineering, science, and 
mathematics. Rt least 1 2 of these 36 hours 
must be at the 4000 level, and at least 20 
hours are to be in electrical engineering 
courses. R minimum of 8 quarter hours in 
4000-level electrical engineering courses and 
at least 1 2 credit hours in courses outside of 
the Electrical and Computer Engineering De- 
partment are required. Rll students must sub- 
mit an acceptable thesis. This program pro- 
vides depth and diversity through specially 
arranged course sequences to meet the 
needs of the Navy and the interests of the in- 
dividual. The Department Chairman's approv- 
al is required for all programs leading to this 
degree. 

€L€CTRKRl €NGIN€€R 

Students with acceptable academic back- 
grounds may enter a program leading to the 
degree Electrical Engineer. 

R minimum of 72 graduate course credits is 
required for the award of the Engineer's de- 
gree. Of these at least 36 hours are to be in 
courses in the sequence 4000-4999. Rn ac- 
ceptable thesis must be completed. R depart- 
mental advisor will be appointed for consul- 
tation in the development of a program of 
study. Rpproval of all programs must be ob- 
tained from the Chairman of the Department 
of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering has an active program leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Rreas of 
special strength in the department are signal 
processing communications systems, elec- 
tronic systems, control theory and computer 
engineering. Joint programs with other de- 
partments are possible. R noteworthy fea- 
ture of these programs is that the student's 
research may be conducted away from the 
Naval Postgraduate School in a cooperating 
laboratory or other installation of the federal 
government. The degree requirements are as 
outlined under the general school require- 
ments for the Doctor's degree. 



LABORATORY 

The laboratories of the department serve 
the dual role of supporting the instructional 
and research activities of the department. 
The department has well developed labora- 
tories in each area of specialty. 

The Controls Laboratory is primarily an in- 
structional laboratory, supporting experi- 
ments in simulation and in hardware manip- 
ulation. The Circuits/Electronics Laboratory 
is also an instructional laboratory supporting 
courses in circuit analysis and design and 
as electronic devices and applications. 

The Digital Systems Laboratory supports 
both instruction and research. The laboratory 
is equipped with microprocessor develop- 
ment systems including a HP64000 for ad- 
vanced course work and thesis research. CRD 
facilities are capable of schematic capture, 
circuit simulation, and fault detection. In addi- 
tion, the ECE Department has a 2500 square 
foot computer laboratory which provides 
general support. Major systems include VRX 
1 1 /785, a number of intelligent workstations 
with interactive color graphics, image pro- 
cessing systems. R department-wide Ethernet 
system will provide resource-sharing and will 
integrate these systems with office and lab- 
oratory microcomputers. 

The VLSI Laboratory supports Work in sys- 
tem design using integrated circuits and de- 
sign of custom integrated circuits. Color 
graphic displays are used for layout of 
N-channel MOS (Metal-Oxide-Semiconduc- 
tor) (NMOS) and Complementary MOS 
(CMOS) circuits. 

The Optical Electronics Laboratory sup- 
ports both research and courses in the areas 
of optics that use electronics. The laboratory 
has low and medium power lasers including 
CO lasers, an argonion laser, a dye laser, 
a Nd:YRG laser and a variety of HENe and 
diode lasers. R variety of detectors and imag- 
ing equipment is also available. 

The Radar and EUU laboratories support 
courses and thesis work. UUorking radar sys- 
tems and EUU systems have been modified to 
allow student access to the signal processing 
portions of the equipment. 

The purpose of the Space Systems Lab- 
oratory is to provide the instrumentation, 
computer software and systems necessary to 
support instructional activities and research 
releated to spacecraft and space systems. 



129 



€L€CTRICflL AND COMPUTER €NGIN€€RING 



This is q relatively new laboratory which cur- 
rently has a DOMSRT earth terminal and a 
TRANSIT navigation satellite receiver in- 
stalled. 

The Microwave Laboratory provides mate- 
rials, devices, components, instrumentation, 
computer software and systems to support 
instructional activities and research in the 
frequency range from 1 00 MHz to 300 GHz. 

The Transient Electromagnetic Laboratory 
supports research related to radar target 
classification based on broadband high-res- 
olution coherent backscattering. 

Other support facilities within the depart- 
ment include the Production Laboratory for 
the prototyping, layout and production of 
printed circuit boards, the Calibration and 
Instrument Repair Laboratory, as well as the 
Supply and Issue Facility for the ordering 
of instrumentation and electronic compo- 
nents. 



D€PRRTM€NTRl 
COURSC OFfCRINGS 



6C 2110 Grcuit Analysis II (3-2). 
R continuation of 2100. Following the introduction 
of the energy-storage elements, dynamic circuits 
are analyzed with the aid of the Laplace transform. 
Network functions and other s-domain concepts are 
developed. Then the special case of the sinusoidal 
steady-state is examined, using phasor methods of 
analysis. Frequency response, filtering, and ac 
power are discussed. PRCR6QUISITC: 2100. 

€C 2150 Review of Circuit R no lysis (4-2). 
R review of circuit analysis for students with a mod- 
erate background in electrical engineering. Starting 
from a review of the basic concepts of current, vol- 
tage, power, signals, and sources, the methods of 
dynamic circuit analysis are developed through the 
real and complex frequency domains. Network func- 
tions, frequency response, and ac power are in- 
cluded, as are the more common circuit theorems. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: Some background in circuit analysis. 



€C 2170 Introduction to electrical engineering 

(4-2). 

Rn introductory course intended for students not 
majoring in electrical engineering. Circuit elements, 
signals and waveforms; power and energy; Kirch- 
hoff's laws and resistive circuits; diode circuit appli- 
cations; application of Laplace transform to the 
step and sinusoidal response of dynamic networks. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: Linear algebra and calculus (may 
be concurrent). 



COURS6S FOR 6NGIN66RING 
AND SCI6NC6 CURRICULA 

€C 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 
Cvery Student conducting thesis research will en- 
roll in this course. 

€C 0950 Seminar (0-1 ). 

Lectures on subjects of current interest will be pre- 
sented by invited guests from other universities, 
government laboratories, and from industry, as 
well as by faculty members of the Naval Postgrad- 
uate School. 

Upper Division Courses 

€C 2100 Grcuit Analysis I (3-2). 
Rn introductory course for students with little or no 
electrical engineering background. The fundamen- 
tal concepts of voltage, current, power, signals, and 
sources are developed and applied to the analysis 
of resistive circuits, including simple transistor amp- 
lifiers and the operational amplifier. The principle 
of superposition, the one-port equivalents due to 
Thevenin and Norton, and the source transforma- 
tion theorem ore introduced. PR6RCQUISITC: Linear 
algebra and calculus (may be concurrent). 



€C 2200 electronics engineering I (3-3). 
Rn introduction to electronic devices and ciruits. 
electronic properties and charge-flow mechanisms 
of crystalline semiconductor material; properties of 
p-n junctions in diodes and bipolar junction transis- 
tors; static and dynamic models for these devices; 
applications of diodes in wave shaping and power 
supplies; application of transistors in amplifiers and 
digital systems; characteristics and fabrication of 
integrated circuits. PR6R6QUISIT6: R first course in 
electrical engineering. 

€C 2210 Qectronics engineering II (3-2). 
Characteristics of discrete device amplifiers and 
operational amplifiers (op-amps). Rnalysis and 
design of amplifiers including frequency response 
and biasing considerations. Rpplications of feed- 
back amplifiers and op-amps. PRCR6QUISIT6: 2200. 



ec 2220 Applied electronics (2-4). 
R project course covering the application of linear 
and communications integrated circuits (ICs). Cov- 
erage includes an introductory overview of impor- 
tant linear and communications ICs and practical 
experimental applications of these devices. PR6- 
R6QUISIT6S: 2210 and 2500. 



130 



€l€CTRICfll RND COMPlTTeR 6NGIN66RING 



€C 2250 Accelerated Review of €lectronics engi- 
neering (4-2). 

Fin advanced review of semiconductor devices and 
circuits intended for students who have previously 
studied the subject matter of 2200 and 221 0. PR€- 
RC-QUISIT6: Sufficient background in electronic cir- 
cuits. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 



€C2300 Control Systems (3-2). 
The application of feedback principles to the de- 
sign of linear control systems using frequency do- 
main (Bode-Nichols), s-domain (root locus) and 
state variable methods. Performance criteria includ- 
ing steady-state accuracy, transient response 
specifications, bandwidth and integral perfor- 
mance indices are presented. Laboratory work in- 
cludes testing and evaluation of physical systems 
and simulation studies. PRCRC-QUISIT6: 2420. 



€C 2370 electromechanical €nergy Conversion 

(3-2). 

Concepts of force and torque developed as results 
of the interaction of magnetic fields are presented 
as the common basis for all electromechanical ma- 
chinery. Fundamental characteristics of DC motors 
and generators, synchronous machines and induc- 
tion motors are developed and applied. Transform- 
ers and control and distribution circuits are also in- 
troduced. PRCRC-QUISITC: A course in circuits. 



€C 2400 Discrete Systems (3-0). 
Principles of discrete systems, including modeling, 
analysis and design. Topics include difference 
equations, z-transforms, stability, frequency re- 
sponse and system diagrams. PRC-R6QUISIT6: 
FORTRAN or other high level language. 



€C 2410 Fourier Analysis of Signols and Systems 

(3-0). 

Analysis of analog signals in the time and frequen- 
cy domains; properties and applications of Fourier 
series and transforms; convolution, correlation and 
spectral density: applications to amplitude mod- 
ulation and demodulation systems. PRC-RC-QUI- 
SITCS: Differential equations and a course in circuits. 



€C 2420 Linear Systems (3-0). 
Formulation of system models including state 
equations, transfer functions and system diagrams; 
computer and analytical solution of system equa- 
tions; stability. PRCR6QUISIT6S: Laplace transform, 
differential equations and FORTRAN or other high 
level language. 



€C 2450 Accelerated Review of Systems (4-2). 
An advanced review of continuous-time and dis- 
crete-system theory intended for students who 
have pervious education in these areas. Topics cov- 
ered by each student will depend upon back- 
ground and competence in the subject matter of 
2400, 2410 and 2420. Some parts of the course 
will be in the self-study mode. PRCR6QUISITC: Suf- 
ficient background in linear system theory. Graded 
on Pass/Fail basis only (Parts of this course may be 
taken through Continuing education as mini courses 
€6-2151-55). 



€C 2500 Communications Theory (3-2). 
In this first course on the transmission of electrical 
signals, the following concepts are formulated 
mathematically and then considered in terms of 
devices and systems: sampling, analog modulation 
and demodulation, frequency multiplexing, digital 
signal representation, digital modulation and de- 
modulation, time multiplexing; applications to 
broadcast systems. PRCR6QUISIT6: 2410. 



6C 2600 Introduction to Fields and Waves (4-0). 
Static field theory is developed and applied to 
boundary value problems. Time-varying Maxwell 
equations are developed and solutions to the 
wave equations are presented. Additional topics 
include skin effect, reflection of waves and radia- 
tion. PRCR6QUISITC: Vector calculus. 

€C 2610 electromagnetic engineering (3-2). 
A continuation of 2600. Topics include transmission 
lines, waveguides, cavity resonators, and high fre- 
quency components. Applications are presented in 
the laboratory. PR6RC-QUISITC-: 2600. 



€C 2650 Accelerated Review of electromagnetics 

(4-2). 

A comprehensive review of basic electromagnetic 
theory intended for students who have previously 
studied the subject matter of 2600 and 261 0. PRC- 
R6QUISITC-: Sufficient background in electromagnet- 
ic theory. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 



€C 2800 Introduction to Microprocessors (3-2). 
A basic understanding of a typical high perfor- 
mance microprocessor and its associated system is 
developed. A methodology for solving engineering 
problems through systematic software develop- 
ment and hardware design is introduced. The lab- 
oratory sessions provide familiarization with state- 
of-the-art development tools and emphasize as- 
sembly language programming and hardware 
interfacing using commercially available micro- 
processor support chips. PRC-R6QUISITC-S: A high 
level language and 2820 (may be concurrent). 



131 



€l€CTRICRl AND COMPUT6R €NGIN€€RING 



€C 2810 Digital Machines (3-2). 
fin introductory course in the analysis of digital sys- 
tems and computers. No previous background in 
electrical engineering or digital techniques is 
assumed. Topics include: Number systems, logic 
gates and logic design; arithmetic circuits; flip-flops, 
counters, registers, and memories; basic digital 
computer architecture and the internal operation of 
computers; and elementary machine -language pro- 
gramming. The laboratories are devoted to the 
study of logic elements, arithmetic circuits, flip- 
flops, registers, and counters. 

€C 2820 Digital Logic Grcuits (3-2). 
fin introductory course in the analysis of digital sys- 
tems leading up to computers. No previous back- 
ground in digital concepts or electrical engineering 
is assumed. Topics include: Boolean algebra, 
gates, truth tables and Karnaugh maps, integrated 
circuit families, decoders, multiplexers, Plfi's; se- 
quential logic including latches, flip-flops, mem- 
ories, registers and counters; and sequential ma- 
chines including state diagrams and synchronous 
systems. 



€C 3400 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing 

(3-0). 

Discrete Fourier transforms and the fast Fourier 
transform (FFT) algorithm, flouu-graph and matrix 
representation of filters, quantization effects, ideal 
filters and approximations, design of recursive and 
nonrecursive digitral filters. Applications such as 
the determination of power spectra, filtering of sig- 
nals and harmonic analysis are considered. PRC-- 
R6QUISIT6S: 2400 and 2410. 

€C 3410 Introduction to Discrete-Time Random 
Processes (4-0). 

Fundamentals of discrete-time random processes 
are developed for digital signal processing, con- 
trol and communications. Topics covered are multi- 
variate analysis and description of discrete-time 
random signals, sampling of continuous-time ran- 
dom signals, statistical averages and second mo- 
ment analysis, linear transformations, optimal 
estimation, and spectral analysis. Subject matter 
includes an introductory treatment of linear predic- 
tion and autoregressive time series models, 
Kalman filtering, and maximum likelihood and max- 
imum entropy spectral estimation. PRCR6QUISITC-S: 
€C 3400 and OS 2102. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

€C 321 Introduction to €iectro- Optical engineering 

(3-1). 

Rn overview of the elements that comprise current 
electro-optical and infrared (CO/lfl) systems. Top- 
ics include radiation sources (both laser and ther- 
mal), detector devices, modulators, optical ele- 
ments, and propagation characteristics. examples 
of various simple 60/IR systems are discussed. 
PR€R€QUISIT€: 2210 (may be concurrent). 



€C 3440 Image Processing and Recognition (3-2). 
Subjects introduced in this course include image 
representation, enhancement, restoration, trans- 
formation, and encoding. Pattern recognition using 
statistical decision theory will be discussed briefly. 
Some analysis involving region segmentation and 
block world understanding will be introduced. 
Some effort is directed to robotic vision where con- 
temporary techniques used to recognize objects 
and extract depth information are dealt with brief- 
ly. There will be a series of experiments using spe- 
cial peripherals and computers. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
3400 (may be concurrent). 



€C 3270 Power electronics (4-0). 
An introduction to the theory and application of 
low-power analog and digital devices used in the 
control of electric power systems found in Ship- 
board Systems. Applications of power electronics 
with emphasis on regulators, inverters and recti- 
fiers. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 6C2370 and differential 
equations. 

€C 3310 Linear Optimal estimation and Control 

(4-0). 

Techniques of optimal control and estimation the- 
ory and their application to military systems. Top- 
ics include performance measures; dynamic pro- 
gramming, the linear regulator problem; state esti- 
mation using observers and Kalman filters; Monte 
Carlo simulation; combined estimation and control 
and case studies. PRCR6QUISIT6S: 2300 and 3500 
(may be concurrent). 



€C 3450 Rcoustic Field Theory (4-0). 
The objectives of this course are to expose the stu- 
dent to various mathematical techniques (both 
exact and approximate), special functions (e.g., 
Bessel functions, Hankel functions, Legendre poly- 
nomials, etc.), orthogonality relationships, etc., 
which will enable him to solve fundamental prob- 
lems concerning the radiation, scattering and prop- 
agation of sound in fluids. Topics to be covered in- 
clude: general solutions of the three-dimensional 
Helmholtz wave equation in rectangular, cylindrical, 
and spherical coordinates with Dirichlet, Neumann, 
and Robin boundary conditions; radiation and scat- 
tering from cylinders and spheres; sound propaga- 
tion in the ocean — the UJKB approximation, ray 
acoustics, and the parabolic equation approxima- 
tion; and other topics as time permits. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6S: 2610 or consent of instructor. 



132 



aermicAi and computer €ngin6€Ring 



€C 3500 Analysis of Random Signals (4-0). 
Fundamental concepts necessary for handling non- 
deterministic signals and noise in communication, 
control and signal processing systems are devel- 
oped. Topics include properties of random time 
functions, statistical averages, autocorrelation and 
the power spectral density, transform relations, 
stationarity and ergodicity, noise models. PR€- 
R6QUISITC-S: 2500 and OS 2102. 
€C 3510 Communications engineering (3-0). 
The influence of noise and interference on the de- 
sign and selection of hardware in practical radio 
communication transmitters and receivers. Specific 
topics include link and signal-to-noise ratio calcula- 
tions, bandwidth trade-offs, carrier and data syn- 
chronization methods and hardware paramenters. 
PRC-RC-QUISITe-S: 2220 and 3500. 
€C 3550 Fiber Optic Systems Fundamentals (3-1). 
Rn introduction to the components and to the con- 
cepts of designing fiber optic communications sys- 
tems. Includes fiber properties and parameters, 
fiber fabrication and testing, L€D and injection laser 
sources, pin photodiodes and avalance photodi- 
ode detectors, receiver design considerations, con- 
nector and splice technologies, and system design 
incorporating analysis and tradeoffs. Data distribu- 
tion techniques are also studied. PR6R6QUISITCS: 
2220 and 2600. 

€C 3600 electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering, 
and Propagation (3-2). 

The principles of electromagnetic radiation as ap- 
plied to antenna engineering and scattering. The 
characteristics of various practical antenna types 
are considered. System parameters such as gain, 
pattern and cross-section are introduced and array 
theory is covered. Rpplications include sidelobe 
suppression, radar target scattering and satellite 
communications. PRC-RCQUISITC: 2610. 
€C 3610 Microwave engineering (3-2). 
R continuation of 261 0, this course covers elements 
of microwave systems. The course begins with a 
discussion of circuit media, network characteriza- 
tion with s-parameters and passive circuits such as 
filters, couplers and impedance transformers. Solid 
state devices and integrated circuits are then dis- 
cussed and electron tubes are treated. The course 
concludes with a study of microwave and millimeter 
wave propagation. Several laboratory exercises al- 
low the student to pursue selected topics in great- 
er depth in a practical setting. PR6RC-QUISITC-: 261 0. 
€C 3670 Principles of Radar Systems (4-2). 
For students in the Rvionics and UUeapons curricula. 
Topics include microwave devices, microwave prop- 
agation, antenna fundamentals, electronically 
steerable arrays, pulse radar basics, detection of 
signals in noise, the radar equation, CUU, pulse dop- 
pler, moving-target indicators, pulse compression, 
thee ambiguity function, tracking radars, conical 
scan, track-while-scan, scan with compensation and 
monopulse. PRC-RC-QUISIT6S: Consent of Instructor, 
U.S. Citizenship and SCCRCT clearance. 



€C 3800 Microprocessor-Based System Design 

(3-2). 

Rdvanced microprocessor system concepts are 
studed. Multimaster and multiprocessor systems 
issues. Memory management issures. Coproces- 
sors and other advanced VLSI peripheral devices. 
HLL for solving engineering applications and link- 
age to OS and assembly language programs. The 
laboratory sessions will emphasize a design proj- 
ect involving advanced microprocessorsystem con- 
cepts. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 2800 and 2820. 

€C 3820 Computer Systems (3-1 ). 
The course presents a unified approach design of 
computer systems stressing the interacting proces- 
ses implemented in hardware, software and firm- 
ware. General features of operating systems are- 
studied as well as specific features of on existing 
system. The elements of multiprogramming sys- 
tems are introduced. PR6RCQUISIT6: 2800. 

€C 3830 Digital Computer Design Methodology 

(3-2). 

R design and project oriented course. Basic princi- 
ples, theories and techniques for practical design 
of digital systems, emphasizes an integrated view- 
point combining essential elements of classical 
switching theory with a thorough understanding of 
the versatility of modern integated circuits. Labora- 
tory introduces modern design aids. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6: 2820. 

€C 3910 Topics in electrical engineering (3-0 or 

(4-0). 

This course examines topics of current interest in 
the field of electrical engineering. PRCR6QUISIT6: 
Consent of Instructor. 



Graduate Courses 

€C 4100 Rdvanced Network Theory(3-0). 

Topology, circuit formulation, nonlinear modeling, 
and computer solutions. Circuit sensitivity models. 
Concepts ond test for passivity, activity, causuality, 
and stability. Driving point synthesis. Transfer func- 
tion properties and synthesis to meet design crite- 
ria. Design with inductorless filters, switched-capa- 
citor filters, operational amplifiers and integrated 
circuit components. PRCR6QUISITC: Consent of 
Instructor. 

€C 4210 €lectro-Optic systems engineering (3-0). 
Rdvanced topics and applications of electro-optics. 
Military applications of infrared technology. Sig- 
nal-to-noise analysis of laser detector perfor- 
mance. Descriptions of high energy lasers, fiber 
optics or other topics. Student reports on CO/IR 
topics of current interest. PRCR6QUISIT6: 3210. 



133 



€l€CTRICfll AND COMPUTER €NGIN€€RING 



€C 4300 Advanced Topics in Modern Control Theory 

(3-0). 

Advanced topics and current developments in con- 
trol theory and applications including such sub- 
jects as: the calculus of variations and Pontryagin's 
minimum principle applied to optimal control prob- 
lems; numerical solution of tuuo-point boundary- 
value problems; nonlinear estimation techniques; 
robust design techniques; large-scale systems; 
system identification; case studies of fire control 
and ship control systems. PRCRC-QUISITC-: Consent 
of Instructor. 

€C 4310 Digital Control Systems (3-0). 
Discrete systems are described and analyzed using 
time-domain and z-transform methods. Analytical 
design techniques are studied, as well as the engi- 
neering characteristics of computer control sys- 
tems. PR6R6QUISITC-S: 2400 and 3310. 

€C 4320 Design of Linear Control Systems (4-0). 
Advanced concepts in the design of linear systems, 
frequency response and root locus methods are 
applied to the design of stabilization and improve- 
ment of performance, using both graphical and 
analytical (algebraic) methods. For more complex 
systems, the Mitrovic-Siljak relationships are devel- 
oped, leoding to coefficient plane, parameter 
plane and parameter space and singular line meth- 
ods. PRCRC-QUISITC: 3310. 

€C 4330 Navigation, Missile, and Avionics Systems 

(4-0). 

The principles of operation of navigation, missile 
and avionics systems are presented. Topics are se- 
lected from the following areas to address the spe- 
cific interests of the class: IR, €0, radar, laser, and 
acoustic sensors; inertial platforms; gyros and ac- 
celerometers; Loran, Omega, GPS, guidance, fir 
control, and tracking systems. PR6R6QUISITCS: 
3310, U.S. Citizenship and S6CRCT clearance. 

€C 4340 Navigation, Missile ond Avionics Systems 

(4-0). 

This course covers essentially the same material as 
4330, but with deletion of detailed analysis of spe- 
cific systems. This course is intended for officers 
who do not have U.S. Citizenship. PR6R6QUISITC: 
3310. 

€C 4350 Nonlinear Systems (3-2). 
Analysis and design of nonlinear systems with 
phase plane and describing function methods. Ac- 
curacy, limit cycles, jump resonances, relay servos 
and discontinuous systems ore considered. PR6- 
RC-QUISITC-: 2300. 

€C 4360 Ship Control Systems (4-0). 
Theory of motion of ships. Basic ship control sys- 
tems: steering control, roll stabilization, boiler con- 
trol loops, speed and propulsion controls. Sea 
states and their effects. Performance objectives 
and performance specifications; models and simu- 
lation studies. PR6R6QUISIT6: 2300. 



€C 4370 Mathematical Models and Simulation for 
Control Systems (4-0). 

Modeling concepts and techniques for linear and 
nonlinear systems. Philosophy of model studies. 
Verification of the model and its parameters. De- 
sign studies using computer models. PRC-RC-QUI- 
SIT€: 2300. 

€C4430 Advanced Signal Processing and Spectral 
estimation (3-0). 

Design and implementation of digital signal pro- 
cessing algorithms. Included are a review of FIR and 
IIR linear filter design techniques with emphasis on 
structures, implementations, and quantization ef- 
fects (finite register lengths, correlated and uncor- 
rected noise). Least square estimation filters in- 
cluding discrete UJeiner filtering (stochastic decon- 
volution), linear prediction, autoregressive moving 
average processing, Levinson's algorithm and lat- 
tice structures, and self adaptive filters. PRCR6QUI- 
SIT6: 3400. 

€C 4440 Multidimensional Digital Signal Processing 

(3-1). 

Fundamentals of digital signal processing for sig- 
nals that are a function of two or more independent 
variables. Analysis in both the time/space and fre- 
quency domains. Areas where the theory of one- 
dimensional signal processing does not extend in 
any straight forward way to two or more dimen- 
sions are highlighted. Topics include convolution, 
difference equations, recursively computable sys- 
tems, sampling, regions of support, multidimen- 
sional periodicity, Fourier analysis including dis- 
crete Fourier transforms, z-transforms, stability, mul- 
tidimensional causality, and an introduction to filter 
design. PR6R6QUISIT6: 3400. 

€C 4450 Sonar Systems engineering (4-1). 
Mathematical development and discussion of fun- 
damental principles that pertain to the design and 
operation of passive and active sonar systems. 
Topics from complex aperture theory, array theory, 
and signal processing are covered. PRC-RC-QUISITCS: 
€C 3450 or PH 3452 or PH 3472 and €C 3500 or 
€C 4720. 

€C 4460 Prindples of Systems engineering (3-0). 
An introduction to the concepts, principles, meth- 
odology, and techniques of the design of large 
scale systems. Lecture topics include the systems 
approach; the system life cycle and system design 
process; determining system requirements from 
operational requirements; system effectiveness, 
reliability, maintainability, safety, and logistic sup- 
port considerations; test and evaluation; and cost 
as a design parameter. Applications to Navy elec- 
tronics systems ore used to illustrate the subjects 
covered. A detailed case study analysis of a specif- 
ic Navy system is performed by the students. PR€- 
R6QUISITC-: Consent of Instructor. 



134 



6L6CTRICRL RND COMPUT6R €NGIN6€RING 



€C 4480 Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) Systems 
engineering (2-2). 

Airborne, shipboard, and ground based interept 
and direction finding system techniques used 
against simple and sophisticated electromagnetic 
radiation systems. Among the topics covered are 
current state of the art for wideband and direction- 
al antennas, uuideband Rf preamplifiers, scanning 
and chirping receivers, displays, recorders, pattern 
recognizers, and signal analysis devices. The lab- 
oratory periods are largely devoted to the specifi- 
cation and block diagram of systems to handle spe- 
cified SIGINT tasks. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: Consent of In- 
structor; U.S. Citizenship and S6CR6T clearance. 

€C 4550 Digital Communications (4-0). 
This course discusses some of the advantages and 
limitations of digital communications systems, to 
include: common modulation formats, matched-fil- 
ter receivers, probability of error calculations, non- 
coherent receivers, carrier synchronization, frame 
and bit synchronization, telephone line modems, 
inter-symbol interference and adaptive equalizers, 
uuide-band modems, exchange of band-uuidth and 
signal-to-noise ratio, diversity combining, maxi- 
mum-likelihood and maximum aposterior probabil- 
ity receivers, and channel capacity and finite rate 
communication with arbitrarily few errors. PR6R6Q- 
UISITC-: 351 0. 

€C 4560 Communications €CCM (3-2). 
Methods of reducing the effects of jamming on 
radio communications systems are considered. 
Matched filter and correlator theory and applica- 
tion to spread spectrum techniques of digital data 
transmission are treated. Synchronization prob- 
lems and techniques are presented. Codes for error 
correction ore briefly considered, frequency hop- 
ping, time hopping, and hybrid systems are studied 
in addition to direct sequence spreading. Use of 
steerable null antennas is described. PR6R6QUI- 
SITC-: 3510. 

€C 4570 Decision and estimation Theory (4-0). 
Principles of optimal signal processing techniques 
for detecting signals in noise are considered. Top- 
ics include Maximum-Likelihood, Bayes Risk, Ney- 
man Pearson and Min-Max criteria and calculations 
of their associated error probabilities (ROC curves) 
for signals in Gaussian noise. Principles of Max- 
imum-Likelihood, Bayes Cost, MMSC and Maximum- 
Aposterior estimators are introduced. Asymptotic 
properties of estimators and the Cramer-Rao 
bound are developed. The estimator-correlator 
structure is derived for detection of signals with 
unknown parameters. This structure is illustrated by 
development of the radar (sonar) ambiguity func- 
tion and matched filter processing systems. State 
estimation and the Kalman filter are derived and 
related to MMS6 estimators. Cmphasis is on dual 
development of continuous time and discrete time 
approaches, the latter being most suitable for dig- 
ital signal processing implementations. PRCRC-QUI- 
SITC: 3500. 



€C 4580 Information Theory (4-0). 
Concepts of information measure for discrete and 
continuous signals. Fundamental theorems relating 
to coding and channel capacity, effects of noise on 
information transmission. Coding methods for error 
control in digital communication systems. Selected 
applications of the theory to systems. PR6R6QUI- 
SITC: 3500. 

€C 4590 Communication Satellite Systems Engi- 
neering (3-0). 

Communication satellite systems including the sat- 
ellite and user terminals. Subjects include orbits, 
power sources, antennas, stabilization, link calcula- 
tions, multiple access techniques, modulation and 
demodulation schemes, phase-locked loops, cod- 
ing, transponder intermodulation and hardlimiting, 
receiver design, spread spectrum in SATCOM for 
multiple access, anti-jam and covert communica- 
tions. PRC-R6QUISITC-: 3510. (May be concurrent). 

€C 4600 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory (3-0). 
An introduction is provided to advanced mathemat- 
ical and numerical techniques of importance in the 
solution of electromagnetic problems. Applications 
of interest in the areas of antennas and microwave 
theory are covered. These include radiation and 
scattering from wires and surfaces and wave prop- 
agation on structures used in microwave inte- 
grated circuitry. PR6R6QUISITC-: 3600 or 3610. 

€C 4610 Radar Systems (3-2). 
The radar range equation is developed in a form in- 
cluding signal integration, the effects of target 
cross-section, fluctuations, and propagation 
losses. Modern techniques discussed include pulse 
compression frequency-modulated radar, MTI, 
pulse doppler systems, monopulse tracking sys- 
tems, multiple-unit steerable array radars, and syn- 
thetic aperture systems. Laboratory sessions deal 
with basic pulse radar systems from which the ad- 
vanced techniques have developed, with pulse 
compression, and with the measurements of radar 
cross section of targets. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 3500 and 
361 (may be concurrent), or equivalent; U.S. Citi- 
zenship and S6CR6T clearance. 

€C 4620 Radar Systems (3-2). 
This course covers essentially the same material as 
4610, but with deletions of detailed analysis of 
specific items. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 3500 and 3610 
(may be concurrent), or equivalent. This course is 
intended for students who do not have U.S. Citizen- 
ship. 

€C 4660 High Frequency Techniques (4-0). 
The high frequency path from transmitter multicou- 
pler to receiver multicouplers. Topics include HF 
propagation, propagation prediction, sounders, 
nuclear effects, ionospheric noise and interference, 
dynamic range problems, antenna and site effects, 
and target location techniques. PRCR6QUISIT6S: 
3600, or consent of Instructor; U.S. Citizenship and 
S6CR6T clearance. 



135 



€l€CTRICAL AND COMPUTER 6NGIN66RING 



€C 4670 electronic Warfare (4-1 ). 

This course is intended for students who ore not in 
the Electronics or Communications (Engineering cur- 
ricula. Three lecture hours ore shared with 4680. In 
addition to the topics listed under 4680, back- 
ground material on communication theory and dig- 
ital signal processing is presented. PREREQUISITES: 
3670, U.S. Citizenship and SECRET clearance. 

€C 4680 electronic (JUarfore Techniques and Sys- 
tems (3-3). 

Active and passive countermeasure techniques are 
considered, including signal representation, signal 
analysis, and signal interception. Important param- 
eters of radar and communications systems are de- 
fined. Denial and deceptive jamming techniques 
are considered along with countermeasure and 
counter-countermeasure techniques. Signal inter- 
cept systems are treated. Acoustic, radio-frequen- 
cy, infrared, and optical countermeasures are dis- 
cussed. PREREQUISITES: 4610, U.S. citizenship and 
SECRET clearance. 

€C 4690 Principles of electronic Warfare (unclas- 
sified) (3-2). 

For students who do not have U.S. citizenship. The 
objectives are to define C-UJ signals and system 
parameters, and establish interrelationships of 
these parameters for active and passive 6UJ sys- 
tems. Topics studied are signal waveforms and 
spectra, receivers, signal processing and display, 
jamming techniques, direction finding, deception 
and confusion techniques. Laboratory exercises 
apply the basic principles of jamming and CCM to 
rodar systems. PREREQUISITE: 4620. 

€C 4820 Computer Architectures (3-1 ). 
A study of advances in computer architecture. Com- 
puter descriptive languages. Memory system is- 
sues. Mini-computers and bit-slice microcomputers. 
High performance computers: pipeline supercom- 
puters, array processors, multiprocessors. Data 
flow architectures. Fault tolerant and military arch- 
itectures. PREREQUISITE: 3800 and 3820 or 3830. 

€C4830 Digital Computer Design (3-1). 
A study of the architecture of and the design pro- 
cess for digital computer systems. Topics covered 
will include instruction set architectures, advanced 
computer arithmetic, hierarchical design tech- 
niques, design of systems using standard and cus- 
tom VLSI devices. Modern computer aided-design 
tools ore emphasized. Laboratory project is the de- 
sign of a digital computer. PREREQUISITES: 3820 
and 3830. 

€C 4850 Computer Communication Methods (3-0). 
The course objective is to develop an understand- 
ing of computer communications network design. 
Coverage includes the essential topics of network 
topology, connectivity, queueing delay, message 
throughput and cost analysis. The International 



Standard Office (ISO) model is divided into physi- 
cal Jink, data link, network, transport, session and 
application layers. The protocol of these layers, 
data framing, error control, flow control, packet 
assembly/disassembly, routing, congestion, virtual 
circuit connection are discussed. New lower net- 
working technologies such as Ethernet, ring, satel- 
lite link, X.25 public packet switching are intro- 
duced. PREREQUISITE: 2500 and 3820. 
€C 4870 VLSI Systems Disign (3-2). 
An introduction to the technology and design of 
very-large-scale-integrated systems. Emphasizing 
NMOS devices and circuits, a structured ap- 
proached to system design is developed. The 
approach is based upon the use of repetitive cell 
structures and highly regular topologies. A com- 
plete VLSI system example is presented in detail. 
Project work is oriented to system and layout plan- 
ning of o small system. PREREQUISITE: 3830. 

€C 4900 Special Topics in electrical engineering 
(2-0 to 5-0). 

Supervised study in selected areas of electrical 
engineering to meet the needs of the individual 
student. A written report is required at the end of 
the quarter. PREREQUISITE: Consent of the Depart- 
ment Chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 

ec 4910 Advanced Topics in electrical engineering 
(3-0 or 4-0). 

This course examines advanced topics of current in- 
terest in the field of electrical engineering. PRE- 
REQUISITE: Consent of Instructor. 

COURSES 

FOR INT6RDISCIPLINRRV 

CURRICULA 

Upper Division Courses 

€0 271 Introduction to Signals and Systems (4-2). 
A first course in communications systems for the C3, 
Space Operations, and Telecommunications Man- 
agement curricula. Coverage begins with the repre- 
sentation of signals in the time and frequency do- 
mains and progresses through linear system anal- 
yis using Fourier transform theory. Analog modula- 
tion techniques are presented emphasizing com- 
munications system level analysis and spectral 
representation. Topics include Fourier series, 
Fourier transforms, linear systems, filters, signal 
bandwidth, communications channels, and ampli- 
tude, frequency, and phase modulation. PRCRCQ- 
UISITC-: MA 2050. 

€0 2720 Introduction to electronic Systems (4-2). 
A first course in electronic systems for the ASUJ and 
ELU systems curricula. Emphasis is on the functional 
aspects of basic circuits and signals. Topics include 
electrical quantities, resistive circuits, inductance 
and capacitance, operational amplifiers, time and 
frequency response, rectifiers and logic elements. 
PREREQUISITE: Calculus. 



136 



€l€CTRICfll AND COMPUT6R €NGIN€€RING 



€0 2730 Control Systems (2-1). 
This course develops the bosk tools of the control 
systems engineer. The applications to electronic 
warfare are emphasized in the examples and lab- 
oratory experiments. The dynamics for a radar con- 
trol system, a missile seeker head tracking system 
and missiles are investigated. Basic topics are 
introduced such as signal flow graphs and system 
step and frequency response characteristics, and 
digital systems theory as used in radar tracking 
and command guided and semiactive homing mis- 
siles. PR6R6QUISIT6S: Differential equations, 
Laplace transform and FORTRAN. 

€0 2750 Communications Systems (4-2). 
A second course in communications systems for the 
C3, Space Operations, and Telecommunications 
Management curricula. Coverage begins with the 
sampling theorem and various forms of digital mod- 
ulation emphasizing the spectral representation of 
digital and pulse signals. Noise is introduced with 
emphasis on its effects on a communication sys- 
tem. Specific topics include sampling, pulse-ampli- 
tude modulation, time-division multiplexing, pulse- 
code modulation, baseband encoding, phase- 
shift keying, noise temperature, noise figure, and 
signal-to-noise ratio. PA6RC-QUISIT6: €0 2710. 

€0 2760 electromagnetic Theory (4-1 ). 

The experimental laws of electromagnetic theory 
and the development of Maxwell's equations are 
presented. Maxwell's equations are then utilized in 
the study of plane waves, transmission lines, wave 
guides, cavity resonators, and elementary radia- 
tion. Laboratory experiments dealing with high fre- 
quency components and measurements reinforce 
and extend the concepts presented in the lectures. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: CO 2720 and MR 2181. 

€0 2790 Survey of Communications Systems (4-0). 
This course supports the Intelligence curriculum by 
providing an overview of the principles, concepts, 
and trade-offs underlying communications sys- 
tems. Topics include: signals and their representa- 
tion as functions of time and frequency, effects of 
bandwidth limitations upon signals, analog and 
digital modems, signal-to-noise considerations in 
communications systems, reliable communications 
path concepts, major communications system de- 
sign trade-offs, and examples of modern communi- 
cations systems. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

€0 3720 Introduction to Signols and Noise (4-1). 
R course in the analysis of signals and noise for the 
RSUU and CUJ curricula. Topics include Fourier anal- 
ysis of periodic and pulse signals, linear filter re- 
sponse, correlation and spectral density of random 
signals and sampling. PR6R6QUISIT6S: CO 2720 
and a first course in probability. 



€0 3750 Communications System Analysis (3-1). 
The final course in communications systems for the 
C3, Space Operations, and Telecommunications 
Management curricula. The objective is to study 
communications from a system perspective con- 
centrating on the relative performance of several 
important communication systems and the analysis 
of trade-offs available in the design of communica- 
tions systems. Specific topics introduced include 
relative performance of modulation types in noise, 
bit error rates, error detection and correction, sig- 
nal to noise ratio, antenna characteristics, prop- 
agation, and path calculations. Special subjects 
will be introduced and existing knowledge rein- 
forced through the study of existing military com- 
munication systems. PRCRCQUISITC: CO 2750. 

€0 3760 electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering, 
and Propagation (4-2). 

The fundamentals of antennas used in the VLF 
through the microwave portion of the electromag- 
netic spectrum are presented. Scattering and prop- 
agation in this part of the spectrum are also dis- 
cussed, as are those elements of electromagnetic 
compatibility which relate to radiation. Laboratory 
exercises relating to pattern and impedance mea- 
surement, and use of computer programs further 
enhance the student's understanding of the lecture 
concepts. PRC-RC-QUISIT6: 2760. 

€0 3780 electronic Warfare Computer Applications 

(3-2). 

Application of digital and analog techniques to the 
recording, processing, display, and interpretation 
of electronic warfare signals and data. The com- 
puter is applied to the solution of electronic war- 
fare problems such as signal identification. PRC-- 
R6QUISITCS: 6C 2810, CS 3510, or CS 3230; CO 
4780. 



Graduate Courses 

€0 4720 Signal Processing Systems (4-1 ). 

A study of digital, analog, and hybrid signal pro- 
cessing systems for communications, echo ranging, 
and electronic surveillance. Examples from current 
and proposed military systems will be analyzed. 
The course is designed for the ASLU and CUJ curric- 
ula. PRCRCQUISITC: CO 3720. 

€0 4730 €lectro-Optic Systems and Countermea- 
sures (3-1 ). 

A study of military applications of electro-optic sys- 
tems, IR and CO missile seekers, laser designators, 
optical surveillance, high energy laser systems, 
laser communications, and laser radar. Cmphasis is 
on system applications, countermeasures and 
counter countermeasures. Students report on elec- 
tro-optic systems. PRCRCQUISITCS: €C 4410 or PH 
3271 ; U.S. Citizenship and SCCRCT clearance. 



137 



€l€CTRICfll AND COMPUT6R 6NGIN66RING 



€0 4750 Signals Intelligence (2-0). 
This course focusesonU.S. signals intelligence capa- 
bilities for countering current threats and the pro- 
cesses for designing or upgrading U.S. capabilities. 
It is designed to enhance the student's knowledge 
and understanding of current ond planned U.S. 
SIGINT systems and capabilities and the design, 
development and employment of SIGINT and €SM 
systems. PRCRCQUISITC: Registration in €UJ curricu- 
lum 595 or consent of Instructor. U.S. Citizenship and 
SI clearance. 

€0 4760 Microwave Devices and Radar (4-2). 
Those microaiave devices most important in radar 
ond in electronic warfare systems are studied, in- 
cluding magnetrons, traveling-uuave tubes, and 
solid-state diodes. The radar range equation is 
developed. In addition to basic pulse radar, modern 
techniques are discussed including doppler sys- 
tems, tracking radar, pulse compression, and elec- 
tronically steerable array radars, electromagnetic 
compatibility problems involving radar systems are 
considered. Laboratory sessions deal with basic 
pulse radar systems from which the advanced tech- 
niques have developed, with performance mea- 
surement methods, automatic tracking systems, 
pulse compression, and the measurement of radar 
cross section of targets. PRCRCQUISITCS: €0 4720, 
CO 3760 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of 
Instructor, U.S. Citizenship and S6CR6T clearance. 



€0 4780 electronic Warfare Systems (3-2). 
This course covers electronic warfare in that portion 
of the electromagnetic spectrum through the milli- 
meter wavelength region. The infrared through elec- 
tro-optic region is covered in a companion course, 
CO 4730. electronic denial and deceptive counter- 
measures against fuses, communications, and vari- 
ous radar detection and tracking systems are dis- 
cussed, equations for required jammer gain and 
power output are developed. The characteristics of 
passive countermeasures are discussed. Othertop- 
ics include anti-radiation missiles, counter counter- 
measure circuits, target masking and modification, 
signal intercept, signal sorting, signal identification, 
and direction finding. Techniques are discussed in 
relation to U.S., allied, and communist bloc systems. 
Laboratory work reinforces the classroom discus- 
sions. PRCRCQUISITCS: CO 4760, U.S. Citizenship and 
S6CR6T clearance. 



€0 4790 C3 Countermeasures (2-0 to 5-0). 

Supervised study in selected areas of electronic 
warfare to meet the needs of individual students. 
R written report is required at the end of the quarter. 
PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Group Chairman. Graded 
on a Pass/Fail basis only. 




138 



€L€CTRONIC WIWFIR€ 



€l€CTRONIC WRRFRR€ RCRD€MIC GROUP 



Chairman: 

Joseph Sternberg, Professor, 

Code 73, Sponogel Hall, Room 200, 

(408) 646-3496, flV 878-3496. 



The Electronic Warfare Academic Group is 
an interdisciplinary association of faculty, 
consisting of eight members representing five 
separate academic disciplines. An academic 
group is a less formal organization than on 
academic department, and each professor in 
the group has an appointment in an academic 
department. The Electronic Warfare Academic 
Group has administrative responsibility for 
the academic content of the Electronic War- 
fare Program of study. Teaching in this multi- 
disciplinary program is carried out by faculty 
members attached to the follouuing academic 
departments: Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering, Mathematics, Meteorology, Opera- 
tions Research, and Physics. Thesis topics for 
students in this area of study are approved 
by the group and the final thesis is approved 
by the Chairman. 



MRST6R OF SC!€NC€ IN 
SYSTCMS €NGIN€€RING 

The degree of Master in Science in Systems 
Engineering (Electronic Warfare) will be 
auuarded at the completion of a multidisciplin- 
ary program, Curriculum 595, satisfying the 
follouuing degree requirements: 

The Master of Science in Systems Engineer- 
ing requires a minimum of 45 quarter hours of 
graduate level work of which at least 1 5 
hours must represent courses at the 4000 lev- 
el. Graduate courses in at least four different 
academic disciplines must be included, and in 
two disciplines, a course at the 4000 level 
must be included. 

An approved sequence of at least three 
courses constituting advanced specialization 
in one area must be included. 

In addition to the 45 hours of course credit, 
an acceptable thesis must be completed. 
COURS€ OFF6RINGS 

€UJ 0002 Seminar (0-1). 

Special lectures and discussion of matters related 
to the ELU program. PREREQUISITE: SECRET clear- 
ance. 

€UJ 0810 Thesis Reseorch/Group Project (0-0). 
Students in the Systems Engineering curricula will 
enroll in this course which consists of an individual 
thesis or a group project involving several students 
and faculty. 




139 



CNGINC-C-RING ACOUSTICS 



€NGIN€€RING ACOUSTICS fiCflD€MIC COMMITTC-C- 



Chairman: 

Steven I. Garrett, Associate Professor, 
Code 61 Gx, Spanagel Hall, Room 1011, 
(408) 646-2540, AV 878-2540. 
The academic character oh the programs in 
the engineering Rcoustics is interdisciplinary, 
with courses and laboratory work drawn prin- 
cipally Prom the fields of physics and electrical 
engineering. Although broadly based, the 
emphasis of the programs is on those aspects 
of acoustics, signal processing, and comput- 
ers related to underwater sound propaga- 
tion, electroacoustic transduction, and the 
detection, classification, tracking, and quiet- 
ing of underwater targets. These programs 
are designed specifically for students in the 
Underwater Acoustics Curriculum and govern- 
ment employees in acoustics-related lab- 
oratories and systems commands. 

The academic aspects of the program are 
the responsibility of an academic committee 
composed of representatives from the De- 
partment of Physics and of electrical and Com- 
puter engineering. The present chairman of 
this committee is 

MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ IN 
€NGIN€€RING ACOUSTICS 

The degree, Master of Science in engineer- 
ing Acoustics, will be awarded as an interdis- 
ciplinary program to be carried out in accor- 
dance with the following degree require- 
ments: 

a. A student pursuing a program leading 
to a Master of Science in engineering Acous- 
tics must have completed work which would 
qualify him/her for a Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in engineering or physical science. Credit 
requirement for the Master of Science degree 
must be met by courses in addition to those 
used to satisfy this requirement. 



b. The Master of Science in engineering 
Acoustics requires a minimum of 36 graduate 
credit quarter hours of course work; at least 
20 graduate quarter hours must be taken in 
acoustics and its applications. One 4000 
level course from each of three of the follow- 
ing areas must be included: wave propaga- 
tion, transducer theory and design sonar sys- 
tems, and signal processing. 

c. An acceptable thesis must be com- 
pleted. 

Approval of each program by the engineer- 
ing Acoustics Academic Committee must be 
obtained prior to reaching the mid point of 
the degree program. 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

RND 
DOCTOR OF €NGIN€€RING 

The Departments of electrical engineering 
and Physics jointly sponsor an interdisciplin- 
ary program in engineering Acoustics leading 
to either the degree Doctor of Philosophy or 
Doctor of engineering. Areas of special 
strength in the departments are physical 
acoustics, ocean acoustics, and acoustic sig- 
nal processing. A noteworthy feature of this 
program is that a portion of the student's 
research may be conducted away from the 
Naval Postgraduate School at a cooperating 
laboratory or other federal government in- 
stallation. The degree requirements and 
examinations are as outlined under the gen- 
eral school requirements for the Doctor's 
degree. In addition to the school require- 
ments, the departments require a preliminary 
examination to show evidence of acceptabil- 
ity as a doctoral student. 



140 



MATH6MRTICS 



D€PflRTM€NT OF MATH€MflTICS 



Choirman: 

Harold M. Fredricksen, Professor, 
Code 53Fs, Ingersoll Hall, Room 344, 
(408) 646-2206, FIV 878-2206. 

Associate Chairmen: 

Research: 

Guillermo Owen, Professor, 

Code 530n, Ingersoll Hall, Room 341 , 
(408) 646-2720, flV 878-2720. 

Scheduling: 

Donald Trahan, Associate Professor, 
Code 53Tn, Ingersoll Hall, Room 345, 
(408) 646-2763, RV 878-2763. 

Advanced Programs: 

Carroll Wilde, Professor, 

Code 53Wm, Ingersoll Hall, Room 346, 

(408) 646-2664, flV 878-2664. 

Rs well as the master of science degrees, 
the Mathematics Department offers individ- 
ually tailored minor programs for many of the 
School's doctoral students. The majority of 
the departmental effort is devoted to the ser- 
vice courses offered, including the refreshers, 
and 1000-2000 level courses. The depart- 
ment maintains a microprocessor lab, avail- 
able at all times to all students and staff. 



a. The program must be approved by the 
Chairman of the Department of Math- 
ematics. 

b. The program must include at least fif- 
teen hours at the 4000 level, with at least 
twelve hours in 4000 level mathematics 
courses. 

c. The program must contain at least nine 
hours in an approved sequence of applica- 
tions courses from outside the Mathemat- 
ics Department, and at least nine hours in 
an approved sequence of courses from 
within the Mathematics Department. 

d. Rn acceptable thesis is normally re- 
quired and is credited as the equivalent of 
nine hours of 3000 level mathematics 
courses. (R student may petition the Chair- 
man of the Mathematics Department to 
substitute nine hours of courses for the 
thesis.) 

e. Courses in the following areas are spe- 
cifically required in any program; some of 
these courses may be used to satisfy part 
(or all) of the mathematics sequence re- 
quirement in item (2.c.) above: 

(1) Real/complex analysis (a two- 
course sequence), or applied algebra 
(a two-course sequence) 

(2) Ordinary and /or Partial Differential 
equations and Integral Transforms 

(3) Numerical Analysis 

(4) Probability and Statistics 



MAST€R OF SCI€NC€ IN 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 



MASTER OF SCI€NC€ DEGAEE 
WITH MAJOA IN MATHEMATICS 



In order to enter a program leading to the 
degree Master of Science in Rpplied Math- 
ematics, a student must have a background 
which would qualify him for a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree with major in mathematics or, 
with a strong mathematical orientation, in a 
physical science or engineering. 

R program that leads to the degree Master 
of Science in Rpplied Mathematics for a stu- 
dent who has met the entrance criteria must 
contain a minimum of 45 quarter hours of 
graduate level courses with a minimum QPR 
of 3.0, subject to the following conditions: 



In order to pursue a program leading to the 
Master of Science degree with a major in 
mathematics, a student must have a back- 
ground which would qualify him for a Bachelor 
of Science degree with major in mathematics. 

R curriculum which satisfies the Master of 
Science degree requirements consists of a 
minimum of 45 quarter hours of approved 
courses in mathematics and related subjects. 
Rn acceptable thesis may be counted as 
equivalent to nine quarter hours. R student 
must have a QPR of 3.0 or greater in any ma- 
jor program. 



141 



MATHEMATICS 



fit the discretion of the Chairman of the 
Department of Mathematics, a student pur- 
suing a program leading to the Master of Sci- 
ence degree with major in mathematics may 
(or may not) be required to write a thesis in 
mathematics. 

The following topics are specifically in- 
cluded in any major program. 

a. 6 hours of Algebra 

b. 6 hours of Analysis 

The main areas of thesis topics are 

a. Optimization 

b. Differential equations 

c. Fourier Analysis 

d. Functional Analysis 

e. Numerical Methods 

f. Optimal Control 

g. Calculus of Variations 

h. Tensor Analysis and Applications. 

D€PRRTM€NTRl COURS€ 
OFFERINGS 

MR 0110 Refresher for BASIC Programming on 
Desk-top Microcomputers; (2-0). 
Numerical calculations and BASIC programming on 
desk-top microcomputers. Numerical calculations 
will include pouuers and roots, logs and exponen- 
tials and trigonometric functions. BASIC program- 
ming includes input/output, loops, branching, sub- 
routines and use of library functions. 

MR 01 12 Refresher Mathematics (5-5). 
Calculus Review. 



MR 0125 Logic and Set Theory (5-0). 
An introduction to the elements of set theory and 
mathematical reasoning. Sets, Venn diagrams, 
truth tables, quantifiers, logical reasoning. Func- 
tions, relations, partitions and equivalence rela- 
tions. 1-1 correspondence. (Paradoxes of set the- 
ory, axiom of choice.) PR6R6QUISIT6: None. 

MR 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

C-very student conducting thesis research will enroll 

in this course. 

MR 1070, 1080, 1081, 1082 and 1083 constitute 
the Technical Transition Program (TTP), and pre- 
pares the successful candidates for entry into MA 
11 16 or 1118. 

MR 1 070 Vectors and Matrices (3-2). 
Solving systems of linear algebraic equations: 
Gaussian elimination, pivotal condensation. Linear 
independence/dependence of systems. Matrix 
algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors for matri- 
ces. Applications using microcomputers. Graded on 
a Pass/Fail basis only. 



MR 1 080 Differential Calculus of a Single Variable 

(3-2). 

Slope of a curve, derivative, velocity and other 
rates of change. Limits and continuity. Differentia- 
tion of products, powers, and quotients; the chain 
rule. Implicit differentiation. Tangent line approx- 
imation and Newton's method Derivatives of Trig- 
onometric functions. Curve sketching, related rates, 
maxima, the Mean Value Theorem. Graded on a 
Pass/Fail basis only. 

MR 1081 Integral Calculus of a Single Variable 

(3-2). 

Indeterminate forms and L'Hopital's rule. Indefinite 
integrals and the Fundamental Theorem. Area un- 
der a curve, trapezoidal/ Simpson's rules. Integra- 
tion by substitution. Applications to motion along a 
straight line, volumes, arc length, work, moments 
and center of mass. Calculus of inverse trigonomet- 
ric, logarithmic, and exponential functions and their 
applications. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 

MR 1082 Integration Methods and Vectors (3-2). 
Integration by parts, products and powers of trig 
functions, trig substitutions, partial fractions. Im- 
proper integrals. Hyperbolic functions. Polar coordi- 
nates. Vectors in the plane and space. Parametric 
equations. Lines and planes in space. Graded on a 
Pass /Fail basis only. 

MR 1 083 Vector Functions/Introductory Differential 
€quotions (3-2). 

Vector-valued functions, tangent vectors, tangen- 
tial and normal components of acceleration, curva- 
ture and arc length in space. Applications to plan- 
etary motion. First order differential equations: 
separable variables, homegeneous, linear, and 
exact equations. Second order differential equa- 
tions with constant coefficients: homogeneous and 
nonhomogeneous, undetermined coefficients, vari- 
ation of parameters. Picard's method and €uler's 
method for numerical solutions. Graded on a Pass/ 
Fail basis only. 

MR 1110 Introduction to RRSIC Programming on 
Desk-top Microcomputers; (2-0). 
Numerical calculations and BASIC programming on 
desk-top microcomputers. Numerical calculations 
will include powers and roots, logs and exponen- 
tials and trigonometric functions. BASIC program- 
ming includes input/output, loops, branching, sub- 
routines and use of library functions. 

MR 1 1 1 2 Selected Calculus Topics Review (2-2). 
Functions, limits, continuity, differentiation of func- 
tions of one and several variables, implicit func- 
tions, parametric equations, optimization; indef- 
inite, definite and multiple integrals; sequences 
and series, series representation of functions; 
Culer's formula; review of complex numbers. PR6- 
R6QUISIT6: A previous course in calculus. 



142 



MATHEMATICS 



MA 1115 Single Variable Calculus (5-0). 
Review of analytic geometry and trigonometry, 
functions of one variable, limits, derivatives, conti- 
nuity and differentiability; differentiation of alge- 
braic, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential 
functions with applications to maxima and minima, 
rates, differentials; product rule, quotient rule, 
chain rule; antiderivatives, integrals and the fun- 
damental theorem of calculus; definite integrals, 
areas, lengths of curves and physical applications,- 
special methods of integration. PRCRCQUISITC: pre- 
calculus mathematics (May be taken through Con- 
tinuing education as mini-courses MA 1 1 31 -36). 

MA 11 1 6 Multivariate Calculus (5-0). 
Review of calculus of one variable,- vector algebra 
and calculus, directional derivative, gradient and 
integral theorems; maxima and minima of functions 
of two independent variables, total differential; 
double and triple integrals, cylindrical and spherical 
coordinate systems; infinite series, convergence 
tests, uniform convergence and Taylor series. PR6- 
R6QUISIT6: Previous course in calculus. (May be 
taken through Continuing education as mini- 
courses MA 1 1 37-40 and 1 1 50.) 

MR 1117 Single Variable Calculus with Laboratory 

(5-2). 

All of the course material of MA 1115 with an addi- 
tional 2 hour problem solving laboratory. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6: Precalculus mathematics (May be taken 
through Continuing education as mini-courses MA 
1131-36). 

MR 1118 Multivariate Calculus with Laboratory 
(5-2). 

All of the course material of MA 1116 with on addi- 
tional 2 hours problem solving laboratory. PR6R6Q- 
UISITC: Previous course in calculus (May be taken 
through Continuing education as mini-courses MA 
1 1 37-40 and MA 1 1 50). 



Upper Division Courses 

MR 2025 Logic, Sets and Functions (4-1 ). 

Propositional logic, elements of set theory, rela- 
tions, functions and partitions. An introduction to 
theorem proving techniques, including mathemati- 
cal induction, in the context of basic mathematical 
systems. 

MR 2042 Linear Rlgebra (4-0). 
Systems of linear equations, matrices, and determi- 
nants, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear 
dependence, basis, dimension, inner products, 
orthogonalization. Linear transformations, rank and 
nullity, change of basis, linear functional, ortho- 
gonal transformations, quadratic forms, symmetric 
matrices, diagonalization, eigenvalues and eigen- 
vectors. PRCReQUISITeS: MA 1 1 1 5. 



MR 2047 Linear Rlgebra and Vector Analysis (4-0). 
Solutions of linear systems of equations, algebra of 
matrices, determinants. Linear vector spaces, linear 
dependence and independence, subspaces, bases 
and dimension. Inner products, ortho-normal bases 
and Gram-Schmidt process, eigenvectors and 
eigenvalues. The algebra and calculus of vectors in 
R 2 and R 3 . Del operator, directional derivative, gra- 
dient, divergence and curl with applications. Line, 
surface and volume integrals, Green's, Stoke's and 
divergence theorems. PRCRCQUISITC: MA 1116 
(may be taken concurrently). 

MR 2049 Applied Mathematics for engineering and 
Operational Analysis (4-0). 

Solutions of systems of linear algebraic equations, 
Gaussian elimination, pivotal condensation,- matrix 
algebra, determinants, independent systems, 
eigenvalues, eigenvectors. Linear, constant coeffi- 
cient, ordinary differential equations, scalarand sys- 
tems, homogeneous and non-homogeneous,- solu- 
tions by formula, by Laplace transforms, and by 
infinite series. PReRCQUISITC: MA 1116 (May be 
taken concurrently). 

MR 2050 Rpplied Mathematics for engineering and 
Operational Rnalysis Plus Lab (4-1 ). 

Course identical to MA 2049 plus a one (1 ) hour 
problem solving lab. 

MR 2121 Differential equations (4-0). 
Ordinary differential equations: linear and non- 
linear equations, homogeneous and nonhomog- 
eneous equations, linear independence of solu- 
tions, power series solutions, systems of differen- 
tial equations, Laplace transforms applications. 
PReReQUISITC: MA 1 1 1 6 or equivalent, MA 2047 or 
equivalent concurrently. 

MR 2125 Differential equations (3-0). 
An abbreviated version of MA 2121, without 
Laplace transforms. PRCRCQUISITC: MA 1116 or 
equivalent, MA 2047 or equivalent concurrently. 

MR 2129 Ordinary Differential equations and 
Laplace Transforms (2-1 ). 

first order ordinary differential equations, second 
order equations with constant coefficients, applica- 
tion, Laplace transforms. PReRCQUISITC: Differential 
and integral calculus. 

MR 2151 Introduction to Complex Variables and 
Numerical Methods (4-0). 

Analytic functions, Laplace's equation, rational 
functions; line integrals in the plane, Cauchy's inte- 
gral theorem, indefinite integration, Cauchy's inte- 
gral formula. Taylor series, finite differences, roots 
of equations, linear equations, numerical integra- 
tion. PRCRCQUISITCS: FORTRAN programming and 
MA 1116. 



143 



MATHEMATICS 



MR 2181 Vector Calculus (2-1). 
Differentiation and integration of vector functions. 
The del operator and related concepts. Green's 
theorem, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorem. 
Interpretations and applications. PR6RCQUISITC: 
Calculus and vector algebra. 

MR 2300 Mathematics for Management (5-0). 
This course is designed to provide a mathematical 
basis for modern managerial tools and techniques. 
It includes elements of differential and integral cal- 
culus, sequences and series and an introduction to 
matrix algebra. PRC-RC-QUISIT6: College algebra. 

MA 2400 Introduction to Vectors, Matrices and Vec- 
tor Calculus (3-0). 

The algebra of vectors and matrices. Systems of 
linear equations, determinants; eigenvalues. Direc- 
tional derivative, gradient, divergence, curl; line, 
surface and volume integrals,- integral theorems; 
applications. PR6R6QUISIT6: Differential and inte- 
gral calculus. 

MR 2401 Introduction to Differential equations and 

Complex Functions (4-1 ). 

Ordinary differential equations including series 

solutions and Laplace transforms; Fourier series 

and partial differential equations; complex analytic 

functions. PRC-RCQUISITC: Differential and integral 

calculus. 

MR 3001 Incremented Directed Study (1-0). 
This course provides the opportunity for a student 
who is enrolled in a three thousand level course to 
pursue the course material in greater depth by 
directed study to the extent of one additional hour 
beyond the normal course credit. 

MR 3002 Incremented Directed Study (2-0). 
This course provides the opportunity for a student 
who is enrolled in a three thousand level course to 
pursue the course material in greater depth by di- 
rected study to the extent of two additional hours 
beyond the normal course credit. 

MR 3026 Discrete Mathematics and Rutomata 
Theory (5-0). 

Analysis of algorithms, elementary concepts of 
semigroups, monoids, and groups. Regular lan- 
guages and finite state automata. Context-free 
languages and pushdown automata. Rpplications 
to computer science. PR6R6QUISIT6: MR 2025. 

MR 3035 Mathematical Introduction to Micropro- 
cessors (2-1). 

Rn introduction to microprocessors at the hard- 
ware/software interface. Machine language pro- 
gramming, assembly language programming, con- 
necting and controlling peripherals (terminal, disc 
drive...), operating systems. 



MR 3046-3047 linear Algebra III (3-0). 
Special types of matrices; orthogonal reduction of a 
real symmetric matrix to diagonal form; quadratic 
forms and reductions to expressions involving only 
squares of the variables; applications to maxima 
and minima; Lambda matrices and related topics,- 
Cayley-Hamilton theorem. Reduced characteristic 
function; canonical forms, idempotent and nilpotent 
matrices; solutions to matrix polynomial equations,- 
functions of a square matrix; applications such as to 
differential equations, stability criteria. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6: MR 2042. 



MR 31 10 Topics in Intermediate Rnalysis (4-0). 
Integrated with linear algebra, functions of several 
variables, continuous transformations, jacobians, 
chain rule, implicit function theorem, inverse func- 
tion theorem, extrema, Lagrange multiplier tech- 
nique, curvilinear coordinates, convexity, difference 
equations and generating functions. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6: MR 11 1 6 or equivalent, MR 2042 or equiva- 
lent concurrently. 

MR 31 32 Partial Differential equations and Integral 
Transforms (4-0). 

Solution of boundary value problems by separation 
of variables; Sturm-Liouville problems; Fourier, 
Bessel and Legendre series solutions, Laplace and 
Fourier transforms; classification of second order 
equations; applications. PR6R6QUISIT6: MR 2121 
or equivalent. 



MR 3139 Fourier Rnalysis and Partial Differential 
equations (4-0). 

Solution of the one-, two-, and three-dimensional 
wave equations by separation of variables and 
characteristics; d'RIembert's solution; ray propaga- 
tion; Fourier analysis applied to ordinary and par- 
tial differential equations,- convolution theorems. 
For RSLU students. PR6R6QUISIT6: MR 2129. 



MR 3185 Tensor Analysis (3-0). 
Definition of tensor. Rlgebra of tensors. The metric 
tensor. The geometric representation of vectors in 
general coordinates. The covariant derivative and 
its application to geodesies. The Riemann tensor, 
parallelism, and curvature of space. PRC-R6QUISITC: 
Consent of Instructor. 



MR 3232 Numerical Analysis (3-2). 
Solution of nonlinear equations, zeros of polyno- 
mials. Interpolation and approximation. Numerical 
differentiation and quadrature. Matrix manipula- 
tions; linear simultaneous- algebraic equations, 
eigenvalues. Numerical solutions of ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Rnalysis for computational 
errors. PR6R6QUISIT6: MR 21 21 or equivalent (may 
be taken concurrently) and FORTRRN programming. 



144 



MATHEMATICS 



MA 3243 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential 
€quations (4-1). 

finite difference approximations for derivatives. 
Truncation and discretization errors. Parabolic and 
hyperbolic equations. Explicit and implicit methods. 
The Crank-Nicolson method. Approximations at 
irregular boundaries. elliptic equations, the 
Uebmann method. Systems of partial differential 
equations. Students ore expected to write 
FORTRAN programs for the above methods. PRC- 
RCQUISITC: MR 3132 and FORTRAN programming. 

MR 3400 Mathematical Modeling Processes (3-0). 
Practice model construction while demonstrating 
the utility and universality of mathematics. Topics 
include modeling using graphical analysis, the 
model building process, modeling using proportion- 
ality, analysis of data, modeling using dimensional 
analysis, dynamical models, optimization of mod- 
els and simulation. PRCRCQUISITC: MR 1 1 1 6 or MR 
2300 or consent of Instructor. 



MA 3675-3676 Theory of Functions of a Complex 
Variable Ml (3-0). 

Selected topics from the theory of functions of a 
real variable; complex functions, power series, 
Laurent series. Singularities of complex functions; 
residues and contour integration,- zeros of analytic 
functions, factors of and infinite product represen- 
tation for analytic functions; maximum modulus 
theorems for analytic and harmonic functions; con- 
formal mapping. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Instruc- 
tor. 

MR 3730 Theory of Numerical Computation (3-0). 
Rnalysis of computational methods used for the 
solution of problems from the areas of algebraic 
equations, polynomial approximation, numerical 
differentiation and integration, and numerical solu- 
tion of ordinary differential equations. PRCRCQUI- 
SIT€: Consent of Instructor. 



Graduate Courses 



MR 3560 Modern Replied Rlgebra (3-0). 
Rn introductory course in the techniques and tools 
of abstract algebra with special emphasis on appli- 
cations to coding theory, radar and communica- 
tions systems and computer science. Clements of 
set theory, equivalence relations and partitions. 
Semi-groups, groups, subgroups and homomor- 
phisms. Rings, ideals and fields. Directed graphs 
and lattices. Applications may vary. PRCRCQUISITC: 
Consent of Instructor. 



MR 4237 Advanced Topics in Numerical Rnalysis 
(Variable credit, usually (4-0)). 
The subject matter will vary according to the abil- 
ities and interest of those enrolled. PRCRCQUISITC: 
Consent of Instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis 
only. 

MR 4362 Orbital Mechanics (3-0). 
R review of the two body problem; non central geo- 
potentials; long-term periodic effects; perturba- 
tions. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of Instructor. 



MR 3565 Modern Rlgebra I (3-0). 
Rn advanced course in the subject of abstract alge- 
bra. Semigroups, groups, subgroups, normal sub- 
groups. Groups acting on sets, operator groups. 
The Jordan-Holder Theorem, solvable groups. The 
Krull Schmidt Theorem. PRCRCQUISITC: MR 3560 or 
consent of Instructor. 

MR 3605-3606 Fundamentals of Rnalysis Ml (3-0). 
Clements of set theory, the real number system, 
and the usual topology of Cn; properties of contin- 
uous functions; differential of vector-valued func- 
tions, Jacobians, and applications (implicit function, 
inverse function theorem, extremum problems). 
Functions of bounded variation and theory of 
Reimann-Stieltjes integration, multiple and itera- 
ted integrals, convergence theorems for sequences 
and series of functions. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of 
Instructor. 

MR 3610 Introduction to General Topology (3-0). 
Topologies, bases and subbases, compactness 
and connectivity. Moore-Smith convergence the- 
orems. Metrization and embedding theorems, uni- 
form structures. Tychonoff product theorem, 
Rlexandroff and Stone Cech compactification. PRC- 
RCQUISITC: MR 3605. 



MR 4391-4392 Numerical Methods for Fluid Dy- 
namics Ml (4-0). 

Rnalytical methods used to study potential, invis- 
cid and viscous flows will be considered in the first 
quarter. Numerical methods for the solution of the 
same problems will be exclusively used during the 
second quarter. PRCRCQUISITCS: MR 2129, MR 
2151 or MR 2401; MR 31 32 or MR 31 39. 

MR 4393 Topics in Applied Mathematics ( 3-0). 

fl selection of topics in applied mathematics. The 
course content varies. Credit may be granted for 
taking this course more than once. PRCRCQUISITC: 
Consent of Instructor. 

MR 4566 Modern Rlgebra II (3-0). 
R continuation of MR 3565. flings, ring homomor- 
phism, integral domains and euclidean domains. 
Unique factorization rings, polynominal rings. Mod- 
ules and ideals. Noetherian rings, Field extension 
and Galois theory. PRCRCQUISITC: MR 3565. 

MR 4593 Topics in Rlgebra (3-0). 

R selection of topics in algebra. Content of the 

course varies. Students will be allowed credit for 

taking the course more than once. PRCRCQUISITC: 

Consent of Instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis 

only. 



145 



MflTH€MfiTICS 



MR 461 1 Calculus of Variations (3-0). 
C-uler equation, LUeierstrass maximum principle, 
Legendre condition, numerical procedures for de- 
termining solutions, gradient methods, Newton's 
method, transversality condition, Rayleigh-Ritz 
method, conjugate points, and applications. PR€- 
R6QUISIT6: MR 2121 (programming experience 
desirable). 

MR 4620 Theory of Ordinary Differential equations 

(3-0). 

Introduction to the modern theory of ordinary differ- 
ential equations. Systems of equations. Theoretical 
and constructive methods of solutions. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT€: Consent of Instructor. 

MR 4622-4623 Principles and Techniques of flp- 
plied Mathematics Ml (3-0). 

Linear operators, generalized functions and Hilbert 
spaces; solutions of partial differential equations 
by eigenfunctions; variational techniques and their 
applications to eigenfunctions; integral equations, 
Laplace, Fourier and other transforms, including 
their inversion in the complex plane as applied to 
partial differential equations; method of character- 
istics for hyperbolic equation. PRCR6QUISIT6: MR 
31 32 or equivalent. 

MR 4635-4636 Functions of Real Variables Ml 

(3-0). 

Semi-continuous functions, absolutely continuous 
functions, functions of bounded variation,- classical 
Lebesque measure and integration theory, conver- 



gence theorems and Lp spaces. Abstract measure 
ac\d integration theory, signed measures, Radon- 
Nikodym theorem,- Lebesque decomposition and 
product measure; Daniell integrals and integral 
representation of linear functionals. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
MR 3606. 



MR 4672 Integral Transforms (3-0). 
The Laplace, Fourier and Hankel transforms and 
their inversions. Rpplications to problems in engi- 
neering and physics. PRCRCQUISITC: Consent of 
Instructor. 



MR 4693 Topics in Analysis (3-0). 
R selection of topics in analysis. Content of the 
course varies. Students will be allowed credit for 
taking the course more than once. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
Consent of Instructor. 



MR 4872 Topics in Calculus of Variations (3-0). 
Recent development of the numerical solution of 
problems in the calculus of variations. Foundations 
of numerical methods, applications to control prob- 
lems. Differentials, perturbations, variational equa- 
tions, adjoint system, conditions for optimum. C-uler 
equations, maximum principle of LUeierstrass and 
Pontryagin, the Legendre condition. Methods of 
solution-, special variations, variation of extremals, 
dynamic programming. Rpplications in ship routing 
and missile control. PRCRC-QUISITCS: MR 2121 and 
computer programming or Consent of Instructor. 




146 



M€CHflNICAl 6NGIN€€RING 



D€PnRTM€NT OF M€CHfiNICfiL €NGIN€€RING 



Choirmon: 

Rnthony J. Healey, Professor, 

Code 69Hy, Holligon Hall, Room M-4. 

(408) 646-2586/3462, RV 878-2586/3462 

Associate Chairmen: 

Matthew D. Kelleher, Professor, 
Code 69Kk, Holligan Hall, Room 209, 
(408) 646-2530, RV 878-2530. 

Paul f. Pucci, Professor, 

Code 69Pc, Holligan Hall, Room 205, 

(408) 64602363, RV 878-2363. 

The Deportment of Mechanical engineering 
provides a strong academic program which 
spans across the discipline areas of structural 
mechanics, dynamics and control, materials 
science and the thermal-fluid sciences. These 
disciplines are blended together with on 
emphasis on naval engineering applications 
such as may be experienced on surface ves- 
sels and in submarines. 

Programs leading to the degree Master of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering are accred- 
ited at the advanced level by the Engineering 
Accreditation Commission of the Rccreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology. 

R specific curriculum must be consistent 
with the general minimum requirements for 
the degree as determined by the Rcademic 
Council. 

Rny program leading to award of a degree 
must be approved by the Chairman of the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering at 
least two quarters before completion. In gen- 
eral, approved programs will require more 
than minimum degree requirements in order 
to conform to the needs and objectives of the 
United States Navy. 

MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ IN 
MCCHflNICfll €NGIN€€RING 

R candidate shall have completed work 
equivalent to the Bachelor of Science require- 
ments of this department. Candidates who 
have minor deficiencies, or who would like to 
review their undergraduate material, may uti- 
lize the NPS Continuing Education Program 



which offers a variety of courses in the self- 
study mode. Candidates who have not ma- 
jored in Mechanical Engineering, or who have 
experienced a significant lapse in continuity 
with previous academic work, initially will 
take undergraduate courses in mechanical 
engineering and mathematics in preparation 
for their graduate program. 
The candidate must take all courses in a cur- 
riculum approved by the Chairman of the 
Deportment of Mechanical Engineering. Rt 
minimum, the approved curriculum must sat- 
isfy the requirements below. 

The Master of Science degree in Mechani- 
cal Engineering requires at least 32 quarter 
hours of graduate level credits in Mechanical 
Engineering and Materials Science, at least 
1 of which must be at the 4000 level. In addi- 
tion, at least 8 quarter hours of graduate 
credit must be earned outside of Mechanical 
Engineering and Materials Science. 

Rn acceptable thesis is required for the 
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
degree. Rn acceptable thesis for the degree 
of Mechanical Engineer may also be ac- 
cepted as meeting the thesis requirement for 
the Master's degree. Rpproval of the thesis 
topic must be obtained from the Chairman of 
the Department of Mechanical Engieeering. 
f]n advisor will be appointed by the Chairman 
of the Department of Mechanical Engineering 
for consultation in the development of a pro- 
gram of research. 

MnST€R OF SCI€NC€ IN 
€NGIN€€RING SC!€NC€ 

Students with acceptable academic back- 
grounds may enter a program leading to the 
degree Master of Science in Engineering Sci- 
ence (with major in Mechanical Engineering). 

The program must include at least 36 credit 
hours of graduate work in the disciplines of 
engineering, science and mathematics, 12 of 
which must be at the 4000 level. Of these 36 
hours, at least 20 hours (8 of which must be at 
the 4000 level) must be in Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Materials Science. 

In addition, the program must contain at 
least 12 hours at the graduate level in 
courses outside Mechanical Engineering and 
Materials Science. 



147 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



The student seeking the degree Master of 
Science in Engineering Science must submit 
an acceptable thesis. Programs leading to 
this degree must be approved by the Chair- 
man of the Department of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

M€CHANICAL ENGINEER 

A graduate student with a superior aca- 
demic record may enter a program leading to 
the degree Mechanical Engineer. A candidate 
is normally selected after completion of his 
first year of residence. 

The candidate must take all courses in a 
curriculum approved by the Chairman of the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering. At 
minimum, the approved curriculum must satis- 
fy the requirements stated in the paragraphs 
below. 

The Mechanical Engineer degree requires 
at least 60 quarter hours of graduate level 
credits in Mechanical Engineering and Materi- 
als Science, at least 30 of which must be at 
the 4000 level. In addition, at least 12 quar- 
ter hours of graduate level credits must be 
earned outside of Mechanical Engineering 
and Materials Science. 

An acceptable thesis is required for the Me- 
chanical Engineer degree. Approval of the 
thesis program must be obtained from the 
Chairman of the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. An advisor will be appointed 
by the Chairman of the Department of Me- 
chanical Engineering for consultation in the 
development of a program of research. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHV 

AND 
DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering 
has an active program leading to the degrees 
of Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Engi- 
neering. Areas of special strength in the 
department are hydrodynamics, viscous 
flows, heat transfer, materials science, dy- 
namics and control, vibrations and finite ele- 
ment analysis. 

Joint programs with other departments are 
possible. A noteworthy feature of the pro- 
gram leading to the Doctor of Engineering 
degree is thot the student's research may be 
conducted away from the Naval Postgrad- 
uate School in a cooperating laboratory or 



other installation of the Federal Government. 
The degree requirements ore as outlined in 
the general school requirements for the 
Doctor's degree. 

LABORATORIES 

The Mechanical Engineering Laboratories 
are designed as complements to the educa- 
tional mission and research interests of the 
department. In addition to extensive facilities 
for the support of student and faculty re- 
search, a variety of general use equipment 
is available. This includes machinery for the 
investigation of dynamic and static problems 
in engineering mechanics; a completely 
equipped materials science laboratory, in- 
cluding a scanning electron microscope, a 
transmission electron microscope, and an 
x-ray diffractometer; an oscillating water tun- 
nel, a unique underwater towing tank and a 
low turbulence water channel; a vibration 
analysis laboratory; a fluid power controls 
laboratory; a robotics laboratory; facilities 
for experimentation with low velocity air 
flows,- equipment for instruction in thermal 
transport phenomena; a laser doppler veloci- 
meter,- nuclear radiation detection equip- 
ment; and an interactive computer graphics 
laboratory. Experimentation is further en- 
hanced by a broad selection of analog and 
digital data acquisition and processing 
equipment and instrumentation. 
DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ME/MS 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

M€0951 Seminars (0-1). 

Lectures on subjects of current interest ore pre- 
sented by NPS faculty and invited experts from 
other universities and government and industrial 
activities. 

Lower Division Course 

M€ 1000 Preparation for Professional Engineers 
Registration (3-0). 

The course will cover the topics from the 8-hour Pro- 
fessional Examination given by the State of Califor- 
nia for Professional Engineer. Discussion will in- 
volve applicable engineering techniques, including 
design and analysis of mechanical systems and 
components. PREREQUISITES: Prior passage of EIT 
Exam or consent of Instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail 
basis only. 



148 



M€CHflNICflL €NGIN€€RING 



Upper Division Courses 
M€ 2001 Introduction to engineering (3-0). 
The origins of engineering. The role of mathematics 
and the physical sciences in engineering. Definition 
of an engineering problem, including its formula- 
tion, assumptions and method of attack. Engineer- 
ing analysis. The engineering design process. Engi- 
neering communications, including graphics. This 
course is intended for students with a non-engi- 
neering background. PREREQUISITE: MA 1 1 1 5 (may 
be taken concurrently). 

M€ 2101 engineering Thermodynamics (4-1). 
fl comprehensive coverage of the fundamental con- 
cepts of classical thermodynamics, with insight 
toward microscopic phenomena. The laws of ther- 
modynamics. Equations of state. Thermodynamic 
properties of substances. Entropy, irreversibility 
and availability. Cycle analysis. Gas-vapor mix- 
tures. Combustion and dissociation. PREREQUISITE: 
Mfl 1116. (May be taken through Continuing Ed- 
ucation as mini-courses ME 2111-1 5.) 
M€ 2201 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics (3-2). 
Properties of fluids. Hydrostatics and stability of 
floating and submerged bodies. Fluid flow con- 
cepts and basic equations in steady flows: mass, 
momentum, and energy considerations. Dimension- 
al analysis and dynamic similitude. Viscous effects 
and fluid resistance. Drag and separated flow over 
simple bluff bodies. Emphasis on naval engineering 
applications and problem solving. PREREQUISITE: 
ME 2502. 

M€ 2301 Introduction to Naval Architecture (4-0). 
Introduction to the hydrostatics and hydrodynam- 
ics of a monohull vessel. Hull structural strength 
using simple approximations and common ship 
building materials. Intact initial transverse and lon- 
gitudinal stability. Stability at large angles of heel 
and under special circumstances such as docking 
and after damage to the hull. Resistance and pow- 
ering of the hull; determination of effective horse- 
power. PREREQUISITES: ME 2201 and ME 2601. 

M€ 2410 Mechanical engineering Lab I (2-3). 
Fundamentals of mechanical measurement sys- 
tems, structured laboratory experiments using 
resistance strain gages, pressure transducers, 
temperature, flow and velocity measurement de- 
vices. PREREQUISITES: ME 21 01 , ME 2201 , and ME 
2601, any of which may be taken concurrently. 
ME 2440 Modern Methods of Engineering Compu- 
tation (3-0). 

Formulation and solution of engineering problems 
using modern computers. Introduction to high-level 
programming languages including FORTRAN and 
BASIC. Development of computer programs includ- 
ing flowcharting;, data transfer, subroutine organiza- 
tion, input and output. Application of programming 
techniques to the solution of selected problems in 
Mechanical Engineering. PREREQUISITES: MA 1 1 16, 
ME 2101, ME 2501 (all may be taken concurrently) 
ME 2441 (must be taken concurrently). 



M€ 2441 Engineering Computational Laboratory 

(0-2). 

Introduction to the computing facilities at the Naval 
Postgraduate School with particular emphasis on 
those unique to the Department of Mechanical En- 
gineering. Familiarization with software available 
at the Naval Postgraduate School for solution of 
engineering problems. Various programming exer- 
cises. (ME 2440 must be taken concurrently). 
Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 

M€ 2501 Statics (3-0). 

Forces and moments, particles and rigid bodies in 
equilibrium. Simple structures, friction, first mo- 
ments and centroids. PREREQUISITE: MA 1 1 1 6 (may 
be concurrent). May be taken through Continuing 
Education as mini-courses ME 251 1-13.) 

M€ 2502 Dynamics (4-1). 

Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bod- 
ies. Rectilinear, plane curvilinear and space curvilin- 
ear motion. Newton's laws, work and energy, im- 
pulse and momentum, and impact. Plane motion of 
rigid bodies and introduction to gyroscopic motion. 
PREREQUISITE: ME 2501. 

M€ 2601 Mechanics of Solids (3-2). 
Stress, strain, Hooke's law. Elementary stress and 
deformation analysis for shafts, beams and col- 
umns. Supporting laboratory work. PREREQUISITES: 
ME 2501 and MA 1116. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

M€ 3150 Heat Transfer (4-2). 
Elementary treatment of the principles of Heat 
Transfer application to problems in Mechanical En- 
gineering. Steady and unsteady conduction. Princi- 
ples of forced and natural convection. Thermal radi- 
ation. Soiling. Condensation. Heat exchanger anal- 
ysis. Use of the thermal circuit analog numerical and 
graphical techniques. Selected laboratory experi- 
ments. PREREQUISITES: ME 2101, ME 2201, MA 
3132 (may be taken concurrently). 

M€ 3201 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics (3-2). 
Steady one-dimensional compressible flow. Funda- 
mentals of ideal-fluid flow, potential function, 
stream function. Analysis of viscous flows, velocity 
distribution in laminar and turbulent flows, introduc- 
tion to the elements of the Navier-Stokes equa- 
tions, solution of classical viscous laminar flow 
problems. Boundary-layer concepts. PREREQUI- 
sites; ME 21 01, ME 2201 , MA 31 32 (may be taken 
concurrently). 



149 



M6CHANICAI 6NGIN66RING 



M€ 3220 Steam Power, Refrigeration, and Turbo- 
machinery (3-2). 

The conventional Rankine cycle steam plants, in- 
cluding superheat, reheat, and regenerative cycles. 
Boiler, condenser, and feed-uuater heater descrip- 
tion. Thermodynamics of refrigeration systems. 
Fundamentals of turbomachinery: energy and mo- 
mentum equations, dimensional analysis, and ve- 
locity diagrams. Application to pumps, fans, com- 
pressors, and turbines. PRCRCQUISITCS: MC 2101 
andMC 2201. 

M€ 3230 Nuclear Power Systems (4-0). 
Introduction to atomic and nuclear physics, Funda 
mentals of nuclear reactor analysis, including nu- 
clear and thermal aspects in core design. Reactor 
system design and operation. Comparison of princi- 
pal reactor types emphasizing significant features 
of marine reactors. Basic health physics considera- 
tions and reactor shielding. Basic insight into waste 
management and reactor safety. PRCRCQUISITC: 
MR 3132. 

M€ 3240 Reciprocating and Gas Turbine Power 
Plants (3-0). 

Thermodynamic analyses and performance charac- 
teristics of spark ignition engines (Otto Cycle), 
compression ignition engines (diesel cycle), and 
gas turbine engines (Brayton cycle). Gas turbine 
component characteristics including the aerodyn 
amies of the compressor and turbine design, and 
the combustor. Ship propulsion requirements, pro- 
peller characteristics, and Ship/ Propeller/Power 
Plant matching. PRCRCQUISrTCS: M€ 2101, MC 
2201. (M€ 3241 must be taken concurrently.) 
M€ 3241 Power Plants Laboratory (0-3). 
Selected experiments demonstrating power plant 
performance, e.g., diesel engine, and gas turbine 
engine. (MC 3240 must be taken concurrently.) 
Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 
M€ 3430 Mechanical engineering Lab II (1-3). 
R project-oriented continuation of mechanical mea- 
surement systems. Rpplication of measurement 
techniques using group projects in thermodynam- 
ics, mechanics of solids, heat transfer, fluid flow, 
vibrations and nuclear radiation detection. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: M€ 241 0, MC 31 50, M€ 3521 , and MC 
361 1. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 

M€ 3440 engineering Analysis (4-0). 
Rigorous formulation of engineering problems aris- 
ing in a variety of disciplines. Rpproximate methods 
of solution. Finite Difference methods. Introduction 
to Finite Clement methods. PRCRCQUISITCS: MC 
2201, MC 2440, MC 2502, and MC 2601. 

M€ 3521 Mechanical Vibration (3-2). 
Free and forced d vibration of discrete linear sys- 
tems. Vibration isolation and suppression. Vibra- 
tion of bars, shafts, and beams. Supporting labora- 
tory work. PRCRCQUISITCS: MC 2502, MC 2601 . and 
MR 2401 or equivalent (may be taken concur- 
rently). 



M€ 361 1 Mechanics of Solids II (4-0). 

Fundamentals of elasticity. Failure theories. Cnergy 
methods. Indeterminate structures. Stability of sim- 
ple structures Torsion of members with non-circular 
cross section. Plate behavior. PRCRCQUISITCS: MC 
2601 and MR 2401 or equivalent (may be taken 
concurrently). 

M€ 371 1 Design of Machine Clements (4-1 ). 

Design of representative machine elements with 
consideration given to materials selection, toler- 
ances, stress concentrations, fatigue, factors of 
safety, reliability, and maintainability. Typical ele- 
ments to be designed include fasteners, columns, 
shafts, journal bearings, spur and helical gears, and 
clutches and brakes. In addition to traditional de- 
sign using factors of safety against failure, particu- 
lar emphasis is placed on design for specified reli- 
ability using probabilistic design methods. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: MC 2410 and MC 2601. 

M€ 3801 Linear Automatic Control (3-2). 
Classical control design for linear systems with sin- 
gle input, single output design requirements. Math- 
ematical modeling of mechanical systems. Transi- 
ent response analysis. Root locus and frequency 
response methods. Control design and compensa- 
tion techniques. PRCRCQUISITCS: MR 21 21 and MC 
2502. 

Graduate Courses 
M€ 4160 Applications of Heat Transfer 

(4-0). 

Rpplication of heat transfer principles to engineer- 
ing systems. Topics include heat exchangers (e.g., 
boilers, condensers, coolers), cooling electronic 
components, heat pipes, solar collectors, turbine 
blade cooling. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 3150. 

M€ 4161 Conduction Heat Transfer (4-0). 
Steady-state heat conduction in multi-dimensions 
with and without heat sources. Transient conduc- 
tion. Numerical methods for heat conduction. Varia- 
tional methods. Mechanical engineering applica- 
tions. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 3150. 

MC 4162 Convection Heat Transfer (4-0). 
Fundamental principles of forced and free convec- 
tion. Dimensionless correlations. Heat transfer dur- 
ing phase changes. Combined conduction, convec- 
tion and radiation heat transfer systems. Heat 
exchanger analysis with Mechanical engineering 
applications. PRCRCQUISITCS: MC 3150, MC 4220. 

MC 4163 Radiation Heat Transfer (3-0). 
Basic laws and definitions. Radiation properties of 
surfaces. Radiant interchange among diffusely 
emitting and reflecting surfaces. Rpplications and 
solutions of the equations of radiant interchange. 
Radiant interchange through participating media. 
Combined conduction and radiation. Combined con- 
vection and radiation. Spectral aspects of gases. 
PRCRCQUISITC: MC 3150. 



150 



M€KHANICRl €NGIN€€RING 



M€ 4202 Compressible Flow (3-0). 
Review of simple one-dimensional flow. General- 
ized one-dimensional flow. Two-dimensional and 
axi symmetric flows. Subsonic flow with small pertur- 
bations. Mach lines. Method of characteristics. 
Prandtl-Meyer expansion waves. Oblique shocks. 
Unsteady, one-dimensional flow. Introduction to 
compressible boundary layer. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 
3201 or equivalent compressible flow coverage. 



M€ 4211 Applied Hydrodynamics (4-0). 
Fundamental principles of hydrodynamics. Brief re- 
view of the equations of motion and types of fluid 
motion. Standard potential flows: source, sink, 
doublet, and vortex motion. Flow about two-dimen- 
sional bodies. Flow about axisymmetric bodies. 
Added mass of various bodies and the added- 
mass moment of inertia. Complex variables appro- 
ach to flow about two-dimensional bodies. Con- 
formal transformations. Flow about hydro- and 
aerofoils. Special topics such as dynamic response 
of submerged bodies, hydroelastic oscillations, etc. 
Course emphasizes the use of various numerical 
techniques and the relationship between the pre- 
dictions of hydrodynamics and viscous flow meth- 
ods. PRCRCQUISITC: M€ 3201. 



M€ 4215 Dynamics of Marine Vehicles 

(4-0). 

Development of the nonlinear equations of motion 
in ship-fixed coordinates. Linear forms. Clements 
of pathkeeping and stability for ships and submers- 
ibles. Maneuverability. Hydrodynamic aspects of 
hull, propulsor, and appurtenances. Design tools 
for estimating hydrodynamic derivatives and their 
effects on vehicle performance. Selected topics. 
PR6R6QUISITC: MC 3201. 



M€ 4220 Viscous Flow (4-0). 
Development of continuity and Navier-Stokes 
equations. Cxact solutions of steady and unsteady 
viscous flow problems. Development of the bound- 
ary-layer equations. Similarity variables, numerical 
and integral techniques. Separation, boundary- 
layer control, compressibility effects. Time-depen- 
dent boundary layers. Origin and nature of turbu- 
lence, phenomenological theories, calculation of 
turbulent flows with emphasis on naval engineer- 
ing applications. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 3201 . 



M€ 4240 Advanced Topics in Fluid Dynamics (4-0). 
Topics selected in accordance with the current inter- 
ests of the students and faculty, examples include 
fluid-structure interactions, cable strumming, wave 
forces on structures, free-streamline analysis of 
jets, wakes, and cavities. PRCRCQUISITCS: MC 4220 
and MC 4211. 



M€ 4321 Reactor engineering Prindpies and De- 
sign (4-2). 

Reactor heat generation and removal. Thermal hy- 
draulic analysis of light water reactors. Principles of 
reactor shielding. Materials and safety considera- 
tions in reactor design. Group design project. PRC- 
RCQUISITC: MC 3230 or equivalent. 



M€ 4420 Marine Gas Turbines (4-0). 
Thermodynamic analyses of gas turbine cycles, in- 
cluding airbreathing and closed cycle engines. In- 
ternal aerodynamics of compressor and turbine de- 
sign. Combustor and source heat exchanger design. 
Materials considerations. Operational controls and 
instrumentation. Lubrication and fuels systems. In- 
let, exhaust, and silencing systems. Propulsion of 
surface effect, hydrofoil, and conventional surface 
ships. Installation arrangements. LUaste heat re- 
covery systems and combined cycles (COGflS, 
CODOG). Auxiliary power generation. Repair and 
maintenance. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 3240. 



MC 4512 Advanced Dynamics (3-2). 
Introduction to the variational principle. Kinematics 
and kinetics of three-dimensional motion for com- 
plex systems utilizing Newton-Culer's method, 
Lagrange's method, and Kane's method. Computer 
software implementation and simulation. Applica- 
tions in robotics emphasizing the dynamic prob- 
lems of design and control. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 
3521. 



M€ 4522 Shipboard Vibration and Noise (4-0). 
Mechanical impedance, transfer matrices and their 
application to transmission of vibratory motion 
from machinery sources to hull plating. Acoustic 
signal generation at the hull-fluid interface. Char- 
acteristics of viscoelastic materials and their use in 
vibration isolation. Multi-isolator mounts. Study of 
accordion and flexural vibration of ship hulls using 
one-dimensional finite element modeling. Military 
vibration specifications. Use of vibration measure- 
ments for machinery condition monitoring. PRCRCQ- 
UISITC: MC 3521 . 



MC 4525 Naval Ship Shock Design and Analysis 

(4-0). 

Characteristics of underwater explosion phenom- 
ena, including the shock wove, bubble behavior 
and bubble pulse loading, and bulk cavitation. 
Surface ship/submarine bodily response to shock 
loading. Application of shock spectra to component 
design. Dynamic Design Analysis Method (DDAM) 
and applications to shipboard equipment design. 
Fluid- Structure Interaction (FSI) analysis, including 
Doubly Asymptotic Approximation (DAA) and sur- 
face ship FSI. Current design requirements for ship- 
board equipment. PRCRCQUISITC: MC 3521 or 
equivalent. 



151 



M€CHANICflL€NGIN€€RING 



M€ 4550 Random Vibrations and Spectral Analysis 
(3-2). 

engineering opplicotion of spectral analysis tech- 
niques to characterize system responses under a 
random vibration environment. Characteristics of 
physical random data and physical system re- 
sponses. Application of probability concepts to 
random data and response analysis. Correlation 
and spectral density functions. Transmission of 
random vibration. System responses to single/mul- 
tiple random excitations. Failure due to random vi- 
bration. Supporting laboratory work. PACA6QUI- 
SIT6: M€ 3521 or equivalent. 

M€ 4612 Advanced Mechanics of Solids (4-0). 
Selected topics from advanced strength of materi- 
als, elasticity, and the theory of plates and shells. 
Applications of finite element codes to the solution 
of difficult problems. PACA6QUISIT6: M€ 3611. 

M€ 4613 finite €lement Methods (4-0). 
Systematic construction of line, surface, and volume 
elements for continuous systems. Computer pro- 
gramming, and applications to structural mechan- 
ics, heat transfer and fluid flow. PRCAC-QUISfTC-: MC- 
3611. 

M€ 4620 Theory of Continuous Media (4-0). 
Tensor analysis. Stress and strain tensors. Motion 
of a continuum. Cnergy and entropy. Constitutive 
equations. Applications to elasticity and fluid dy- 
namics. PA6A6QUISITCS: M€ 3201 and M€ 361 1. 

M€ 4721 Marine Vehicle Design (2-4). 
Various categories of marine vehicles are de- 
scribed; this includes single hull, multiple hull, sub- 
marine, surface effect, wing-in-ground effect and 
hydrofoil vehicles. A category of marine vehicle is 
selected to fulfill a stated mission. A vehicle config- 
uration and specification of major components 
which satisfies mission requirements is sought. 
Consideration is given to all major facets of marine 
vehicle synthesis including structures, hull forces, 
propulsion, electronics, armament, crew, etc. PA6- 
AC-QUISIT6-. Consent of Instructor. 

M€ 4722 Marine engineering Design (2-4). 
A major component of a marine vehicle is designed 
so as to meet stated specifications. Impact of the 
design features of the major component upon the 
overall vehicle performance is considered; empha- 
sis is on design tradeoffs. Examples of major com- 
ponents to be designed include complete electrical 
power generation and distribution system, steer- 
ing, superconducting electrical motors for main pro- 
pulsion, bulbous bow for sonar, arorr protection of 
CIC, etc. PR6A6QUISIT6: Consent of Instructor 

M€ 4731 engineering Design Optimization (4-0). 
Application of automated numerical optimization 
techniques to design of engineering systems. Algo- 
rithms for solution of nonlinear constrained design 



problems. Familiarization with available design 
optimization programs. State-of-the-art applica- 
tions. Solution of a variety of design problems in 
mechanical engineering, using numerical optimiza- 
tion techniques. PA6A6QUISITCS: M€ 3150, M€ 
3201 , M€ 361 1 , M€ 2440 and MA 2400, or equiv- 
alent. 

M€ 4801 Fluid Power Control (3-2). 
Fluids and fluid flows in high-performance of actua- 
tors and controllers. Power flow and fluid power 
elements — valve and pump control, linear and ro- 
tary motion. State space descriptions. Design of 
electrohydraulic position and velocity control 
servomechanisms for high performance with sta- 
bility. Supporting laboratory experiments. PA€- 
A6QUISIT€:M€3801. 

M€ 4802 Marine Propulsion Control (3-2). 
Introduction to dynamic propulsion systems model- 
ing and analysis methods. Control design specifi- 
cations and design strategies. Introduction to 
modern control design theory and multivariate 
methods. Theory and applications of optimal con- 
trol and discrete-time control systems. Case stud- 
ies of current Naval propulsion control systems. 
PAC-AC-QUISITC-S: M€ 3801 , M€ 3240 (may be taken 
concurrently), and MA 31 32. 

M€ 4902 Advanced Study in Mechanical engineer- 
ing (1-0 to 6-0). 

Directed advanced study in mechanical engineer- 
ing on a subject of mutual interest to student and 
staff member. May be repeated for credit with a dif- 
ferent topic. PR6R6QUISITC: Permission of Deport- 
ment Chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 



MRT6RIRLS SCI6NC6 

Upper Division Course 

MS 2201 engineering Materials (3-2). 
The basic principles of materials science are cov- 
ered with emphasis on the factors involved in con- 
trol of the strength and ductility of metallic materi- 
als of Naval interest. Atomic and crystal structure 
ore discussed and emphasis is given to microstruc- 
turol control and microstructure-property relation- 
ships. Additional topics include crystalinne defects, 
deformation processes, strengthening mechanisms 
and heat treatment. The course aims to provide the 
student with the working vocabulary and concep- 
tual understanding necessary to more advanced 
study and for communication with materials ex- 
perts. PA6R6QUISIT6: Undergraduate courses in 
physics and chemistry and consent of Instructor. 



152 



M6CHANICRI 6NGIN66RING 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 
MS 3201 Materials Science and engineering (3-2). 
Fundamental principles of materials science are 
presented with particular emphasis on and ad- 
vanced coverage of the relationship between 
microstructure and mechanical properties of engi- 
neering materials. The effects of atomic structure, 
crystal structure and microstructure on properties 
are presented. Crystalline defects, deformation 
processes, strengthening mechanisms, fracture, 
phase equilibria, phase transformations and meth- 
ods of microstructural control are discussed and 
practical examples are included. The course aims at 
providing the engineering student with the vocab- 
ulary and conceptual understanding necessary for 
further study and for communicating on materials 
engineering topics. PR€R€QUISIT€: Undergraduate 
course in chemistry and physics. 
MS 3202 Failure Analysis and Prevention (3-2). 
Properties, problems and failures of structural 
materials are studied in the context of actural case 
studies. Topics of interest to Naval, flero and Wea- 
pons engineers are included. For a given case 
study, the cause(s) of failure ore discussed, and 
the relevant fundamental knowledge to fully un- 
derstand the observed phenomena is developed. 
Failures occurring by fatigue, brittle fracture and 
corrosion mechanisms are discussed. Failure pre- 
vention, materials developments and modern 
methods of materials analysis are among the many 
aspects that are of interest. PR€R€QUISIT€: MS 
3201 or equivalent or consent of Instructor. 
MS 3304 Corrosion and Marine environmental 
Degradation (3-2). 

Presents the basic chemical, electrochemical, me- 
chanical, and metallurgical factors which influence 
the corrosion, oxidation, and deterioration of ma- 
terials. Discusses standard methods of corrosion 
control, such as cathodic protection coatings, clad- 
ding, alloy selection, and inhibitors; special prob- 
lems encountered in unfamiliar environment. PRC-- 
R6QUISIT6: MS 2201 or equivalent. 
MS 3401 Microscopy (3-2). 
electron microscopy and other sophisticated tech- 
niques are emphasized in a coverage of modern 
methods of microscopic observation. Techniques 
covered include scanning electron microscopy, 
transmission electron microscopy, conventional 
microprobe analysis, field ion microscopy, and po- 
larized light, stereo, interference, phase contrast, 
and holographic light optical methods. Course and 
lab will simultaneously cover both theory and prac- 
tice, including specimen preparation, instrument 
design and operation, and applications, PRC-R6QUI- 
SITC-: Consent of Instructor. 

MS 3505 Materials Selection for Military Applica- 
tions (4-0). 

This course deals in depth with one of the most 
common and important problems in materials engi- 
neering, that of selecting the optimum material for 
a given application. Consideration is also given to 



evolution of new applications for existing materi- 
als, and to materials development for new and old 
applications, fl variety of application areas are 
covered, including marine structures, aerospace 
applications, nuclear reactors, electronics, high 
temperature cryogenic services, and many other 
situations. Sources of information, methodology, 
and basic rationale for materials selection deci- 
sions are presented. (Emphasis is put on the vari- 
ation in properties of a given material with pro- 
cessing history, and on variation of properties in 
service. PRCR6QUISIT6: MS 2201 or equivalent. 
MS 3606 Introduction to Welding and Joining Met- 
allurgy (3-2). 

Metallurgical aspects of welding and joining pro- 
cesses; nature of and applications of welding and 
joining processes,- welding and joining of steels, 
aluminum alloys, stainless steels, heat-resistant al- 
loys and copper-base alloys; inspection and quali- 
ty assurance of weldments. PR6R6QUISITC: MS 
2201/3201. 

Graduate Courses 
MS 4215 Phase Transformations (3-2). 
Structural changes which commonly occur in materi- 
als by various mechanisms are considered. Solidifi- 
cation, precipitation, recrystallization, and marten- 
sitic transformations are emphasized, both in princi- 
ple and in regard to their technological importance. 
Principles of nucleation and growth, diffusion and 
kinetics are presented and their relevance to prac- 
tical heat treating and fabrication processes are 
considered. PRCRCQUISIT6: MS 2201 or equivalent. 
MS 4302 Special Topics in Materials Science ( 1 -0 to 
6-0). 

Directed advanced study in materials science on a 
subject of mutual interest to student and staff 
member. May be repeated for credit with a differ- 
ent topic. PRC-RC-QUISITC-: Permission of Department 
Chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 
MS 4312 Advanced Materials (4-0). 
The course is structured to provide a vehicle for the 
study of materials pertinent to a specific area of 
environment utilization or design. (Example catego- 
ries are marine materials, nuclear materials, ele- 
vated-temperature materials, aircraft alloys, mate- 
rials for energy conversion. Topics discussed may 
include material failures, materials selection, test- 
ing, and new concepts in materials engineering. 
Course scope is decided by mutual agreement of 
students and Instructor. PRCR6QUISIT6S: MS 2201 , 
MS 3202, or equivalent. 

MS 481 1 Mechanical Behavior of engineering 
Materials (4-0). 

The response of structural materials to mechanical 
stress is discussed with emphasis on plastic defor- 
mation in metals. Topics include mechanisms of 
high-temperature deformation, fatigue, and frac- 
ture. New concepts allowing development of mate- 
rials to circumvent these failure mechanisms are 
treated. PR6RC-QUISITCS: MS 3202 or permission of 
Instructor. 



153 



M€T€OROLOGV 



D€PfiRTM€NT OF M€T€OROlOGV 



Choirmon: 

Robert J. Renard, Professor, 
Code 63Rd, Root Hall. Room 252, 
RV 878-251 6, (408) 646-251 6. 

Associate Choirmon: 

Research: 

Russell L. Clsberry, Professor, 
Code 636s, Root Hall, Room 243, 
RV 878-2373, (408) 646-2373. 

Curriculum: 

Robert L Haneu, Professor, 
Code 63Hu, Root Hall, Room 245, 
RV 878-2308, (408) 646-2308. 



boundary layer studies with emphasis on air/ 
sea interactions and electro-magnetic/optic 
propagation, and a wide range of synoptic 
studies (e.g. model output statistics, regional 
studies, maritime cyclogenesis, short range 
forecasting, numerical-model output verifica- 
tion). 

Both Visiting Scientist and Navy-sponsored 
Research Chair programs are an integral part 
of the Department's operation. The Ph.D. pro- 
gram in the Department is active with Navy 
and Rir Force officers, DOD civilians and inter- 
nationals among its recent graduates. 



The Department of Meteorology is one of 
six Departments in the Science and engineer- 
ing Division, and its history dates bach to the 
1 940s when it was part of the Postgraduate 
Department at the Naval Academy. The De- 
partment's academic function is interdisciplin- 
ary in nature, in that its supports separate 
Master of Science Degree programs in Mete- 
orology, Meteorology and Oceanography, 
and Oceanography, and also provides 
courses for the Space, Antisubmarine War- 
fare, electronic UUarfare and C3 Curricula. 

Department academic strengths include 
air/ocean dynamics and numerical modeling 
and prediction, physical processes of the air/ 
ocean boundary layer, satellite remote sens- 
ing and its applications, and synoptic mete- 
orology, to include analysis and prediction 
in tropical, middle latitude and polar regions 
of both hemispheres. More than forty courses 
are offered in Meteorology, primarily at the 
graduate level. The Department has thirteen 
teaching faculty, and nine adjunct research 
faculty who are active researchers, with grad- 
uate student participation as research-team 
members through the M.S. thesis and Ph.D. 
dissertation process. The current areas of 
research concentration encompass numerical 
and analytic air/ocean modeling and numeri- 
cal weather prediction, tropical meteorology 
including monsoon circulations and tropical 
cyclone forecasting, climate dynamics, marine 



D€PRRTM€NT R€QUIR€M€NTS 
FOR D€GR€€S 

Master of Science in Meteorology 

Entrance to a program leading to a Master 
of Science degree in Meteorology requires a 
baccalaureate degree with completion of 
mathematics through differential and integral 
calculus and a minimum of one year of college 
physics. 

The degree of Master of Science in Mete- 
orology requires completion of: 

a. Mathematics courses in vector anal- 
sis, partial differential equations, and 
application of numerical methods and 
computers to the solution of differential 
equations. 

b. A basic course in applied probability 
and statistics. 

c. The basic sequence of graduate 
courses in the fields of dynamical, physi- 
cal and synoptic meteorology, which 
must include eighteen quarter hours in 
the 4000 series. 

d. An acceptable thesis. 



154 



M€T€OROLOGV 



Master of Science in Meteorology 
and Oceanography 

Direct entrance to a program leading to the 
degree Master of Science in Meteorology 
and Oceanography requires a baccalaureate 
degree, preferably in physical sciences, math- 
ematics or engineering. This normally permits 
the validation of a number of required under- 
graduate courses such as physics, chemistry, 
differential equations, linear algebra, vector 
analysis and various courses in meteorology 
and/or oceanography, which are prerequi- 
sites to the graduate program. These prereq- 
uisites may be taken at the Naval Postgrad- 
uate School; however, in that event the pro- 
gram may be lengthened by one or more 
quarters. 

The degree of Master of Science in Mete- 
orology and Oceanography requires: 

a. Completion of forty-eight quarter 
hours in meteorology and oceanogra- 
phy, to include at least twenty hours in 
the 4000 series, with a minimum of one 
4000-level course in other than directed 
study. 

b. The basic sequence of graduate 
courses in the fields of dynamical, physi- 
cal and synoptic meteorology/ocean- 
ography must be included in the forty- 
eight hours. 

c. Completion of an acceptable thesis on 
a topic approved by either department. 



DOQOR OF PHILOSOPHV 

The Ph.D. Program is offered in the Depart- 
ment of Meteorology in the following areas 
of study: numerical weather prediction, geo- 
physical fluid dynamics, boundary-layer met- 
eorology, analysis of atmospheric systems 
and tropical meteorology. 

The requirements for the degree are 
grouped into three categories: course work, 
research in conjunction with an approved dis- 
sertation, and examination in both the major 
and a minor field. The minor field is usually in 
oceanography, mathematics or physics. 

The required examinations are described in 
this catalog in the section Requirements for 
the Doctor's Degree. The Department of 



Meteorology also may require a preliminary 
examination to show evidence of acceptabil- 
ity as a doctoral student. 

Prospective students should consult with 
the Chairman of the Department of Meteorol- 
ogy for further guidance regarding doctoral 
programs. 



LABORRTORI€S 

In addition to the standard synoptic lab- 
oratories, NPS meteorological facilities in- 
clude a variety of instruments for observing 
the atmosphere and equipment for receiving 
weather analyses and forecasts emanating 
from the National UJeather Service, including 
the DIFflX facsimile network system and the 
COMCDS link to the Automated UJeather Net- 
work. Additional information is received from 
Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center via the 
Naval environmental Display System. UJeath- 
er satellite data are received on a UNIFAX 
recorder via GOCSTAP and displayed in ani- 
mated form by the Digital UJeather Image 
Processing System. Rawinsonde equipment, 
acoustic sounders and micrometeorologically 
instrumented masts, and an NSF-owned Re- 
search Vessel operated by the Moss Land- 
ing Marine Laboratory, are utilized by faculty 
and students in the meteorology and ocean- 
ography programs. Interactive computer pro- 
cessing of satellite and conventional data is 
conducted using the COMTAL image analysis 
system and the VAX 1 1 /750 minicomputer in 
the Computer Science Department Labora- 
tory. A Joint Meteorology/Oceanography 
Interactive Digital environmental Analysis 
Laboratory began operation in 1 986 to pro- 
vide real-time acquisition and analysis of 
conventional remotely-sensed data in sup- 
port of the synoptic and physical meteorol- 
ogy programs. Supplementing the School's 
extensive computer facilities, discussed in the 
General Information section of the Catalog, 
the Department also maintains its own Com- 
puter Facility to support faculty and staff 
research, and student thesis/dissertation 
projects, equipment includes a number of net- 
worked microcomputers, data and graphics 
terminals, plotters and printers. 



155 



M€T€OROLOGV 



D€PflRTM€NTfll 
COURS€ OFFERINGS 

MR 1 1 0- 1 1 - 1 2- 1 3 Applications Seminars ( 1 -0 ) 

Presentation of DOD related research activities, 
applications to uueapons and warfare systems, uti- 
lization of oceanography and meteorology in spe- 
cific billets, presentations by faculty, staff, selected 
students and visiting authorities. MR 01 10 is for 
orientation; MR 0111 is for intermediate students; 
MR 01 12/01 13 is for thesis orientation/topic se- 
lection. PRCRCQUISITC: enrollment in an flir-Ocean 
Science curriculum. 

MR 081 Thesis Research (0-0). 

€very student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

MR 0999 Seminar in Meteorology (2-0). 
Students present results of thesis or other ap- 
proved research investigation. PRCRCQUISITC: Con- 
current preparation of thesis or other acceptable 
research paper. 

Upper Division Courses 

MR 2020 Computer Computations in flir-Ocean Sci- 
ences (1-2). 

Introduction to FORTRAN and the NPS main frame 
computer as applied to elementary problems in 
oceanography and meteorology. PRCRCQUISITCS: 
Calculus and college physics. 

MR 2200 Introduction to Meteorology (4-0). 
Rn introductory course that treats the composition 
and structure of the atmosphere, thermodynamic 
processes, forces and related small- and large- 
scale motions, air masses, fronts, severe storms, 
solar and terrestrial radiation, general circulations 
and weather forecasting. PRCRCQUISITC: Depart- 
ment approval. (May be taken through Continuing 
education as minicourses MR 2201 -02. ) 

MR 2210 Introduction to Meteorology/Laboratory 

(4-2). 

Same course as MR 2200 plus laboratory periods 
illustrating lecture material, including weather map 
analysis over oceanic areas using satellite imagery. 
PRCRCQUISITC: Department approval. 

MR 2220 Marine Meteorology (4-1 ). 

Rn introductory course covering forces and related 
small- and large-scale atmospheric motions and 
their interaction with the ocean, severe rotating 
storms, fronts, general circulation and radiation, 
atmospheric stability, observation techniques, syn- 
optic charts over marine regions, basics of remote 
sensing and satellite imagery interpretation, fore- 
casting, climates over the ocean, and sea ice and 
icebergs. Laboratory exercises illustrate lecture 
material. PRCRCQUISITC: Department approval. 



MR 2262 Clements of Weather Forecasting ( 1 -2). 
Survey of subjective and objective methods of 
atmospheric prognosis. Weather briefings illus- 
trate applications of forecasting principles and use 
of satellite imagery. PRCRCQUISITCS: MR 3222, MR 
3230 or consent of Instructor. 



MR 2300 Observations, Instruments and Climatol- 
ogy (3-2). 

Surface and upper-air observations, including 
rawinsondes. Instruments used in synoptic obser- 
vations. Climate classifications, changes and con- 
trols; basic statistical quantities used in climatol- 
ogy; applications to world climates. PRCRCQUISITC: 
Introductory Meteorology course (may be concur- 
rent). 



MR 2413 Meteorology for Antisubmarine Warfare 
(3-1). 

Atmospheric factors affecting the fluxes of momen- 
tum, heat and moisture across the air-sea interface; 
local and synoptic-scale atmospheric features rele- 
vant to electro-magnetic and electro-optical wave 
propagation; hands-on experience with existing 
environmental effects assessment models. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: Differential and integral calculus (may 
be concurrent). 



MR 2416 Meteorology for electronic Warfare 
(2-0). 

A survey of environmental factors affecting the 
propagation or\d attenuation of electro-magnetic 
waves. Synoptic and climatological conditions as- 
sociated with anomalous refraction are studied. 
Layers associated with high aerosol concentration 
and optical turbulence are identified. Hands-on 
experience with existing environmental effects as- 
sessment models. PRCRCQUISITCS: Calculus, Com- 
puter Programming, electromagnetic Theory (may 
be concurrent). 



MR 241 9 Atmospheric Factors In C 3 (2-0). 
R survey of atmospheric properties and processes 
affecting propagation of electromagnetic (CM) and 
electro-optical (CO) waves. Tropospheric phenom- 
ena associated with standard and anomalous CM 
wave propagation at wavelengths greater than 1 
meters. Ionospheric phenomena associated with 
larger wavelength (Hf) propagation. PRCRCQUI- 
SITC: enrollment in C 3 curriculum. 



MR 2520 Survey of Air-Ocean Remote Sensing 

(3-0). 

Overview of systems for remote sensing of the at- 
mosphere and oceans from space, and operational 
applications. PRCRCQUISITCS: Undergraduate Phys- 
ics and Calculus, or consent of Instructor. 



156 



M6T60ROLOGV 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 
MR 3140 Probability and Statistics for Rir-Ocean 
Science (3-2). 

Basic probability and statistics, in the air-ocean sci- 
ence context. Techniques of statistical data anal- 
ysis. Structure of a probability model, density distri- 
bution function, expectation and variance. Binom- 
ial, Poisson and Gaussian distributions. Conditional 
probability and independence. Joint distributions, 
covariance and central limit theorem. Transforma- 
tions of random variables. Histograms and empiri- 
cal distributions and associated characteristics 
such as moments and percentiles. Standard tests 
of hypotheses and confidence intervals for both 
one-and two-parameter situations. Regression 
analysis as related to least squares estimation. 
PRCR6QUISIT6: Calculus. 

MR 31 50 Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series (3-2). 
Analysis methods for atmospheric and oceanic time 
series. Correlation, spectrum and empirical ortho- 
gonal function analyses. Statistical objective anal- 
ysis. Optimal design of air-ocean data networks. 
PR€R€QUISIT€S: MR 2121, and a probability and 
statistics course. 

MR 3212 Polar Meteorology/ Oceanography 
(4-0). 

Operational aspects of arctic and antarctic mete- 
orology. Polar oceanography. Sea-ice; its seasonal 
distribution, melting and freezing processes, physi- 
cal and mechanical properties, drift and predic- 
tions. Rspects of geology and geophysics. Pft£f\eQ- 
UISITCS: OC 3240, MR 3222 or consent of Instructor. 

MR 3220 Meteorological Analysis (4-0). 
Techniques of evaluation, interpretation and anal- 
ysis of pressure, wind, temperature and moisture 
data, including weather satellite observations, 
with emphasis on the low and middle troposphere. 
Synoptic models of extratropical vortices, waves 
and frontal systems, with emphasis on three di- 
mensional space structure and time continuity. 
Introduction to analysis in the high troposphere 
and low stratosphere. PRCRCQUISIT6S: MR 3420, 
MR/OC3321. 

MR 3222 Meteorological Analysis/ Laboratory 

(4-3). 

Same as MR 3220 plus laboratory sessions on the 
concepts considered in the lectures, with emphasis 
on the analysis of the low and middle troposphere, 
streamline and isotach analysis techniques, satel- 
lite interpretation, and vertical cross-section anal- 
yses. PR6R60UISITC: MR 3420, MR/OC 3321 . 
MR 3230 Troposphere and Stratospheric Meteorol- 
ogy (4-0). 

Rn analytic and synoptic interpretation of tropo- 
spheric and stratospheric systems with emphasis 
on the middle and high altitude aspects of extra- 
tropical cyclones, jet streams and fronts, and re- 
lated dynamical properties. PR6R6QUISIT6S: MR 
3222 (may be concurrent). 



MR 3234 Tropospheric and Stratospheric Meteorol- 
ogy/Loboratory (4-3). 

Same as MR 3230, plus laboratory sessions em- 
phasizing 4-dimensional interrelationships in the 
troposphere and lower stratosphere. Diagnostic 
weather briefs introduce both National Meteoro- 
logical Center and Fleet Numerical Oceanography 
Center products. PRCR6QUISITCS: enrollment in 
Operational Oceanography Curriculum or consent 
of Chairman; MR 3222. 

MR 3235 Tropospheric and Stratospheric Meteorol- 
ogy Laboratory (0-7). 

Practice in 4-dimensional synoptic-scale analysis of 
variables considered in MR 3230. Cmphasis is on a 
physical understanding of dynamical relationships, 
including vorticity, divergence and vertical velocity. 
Diagnostic weather briefs introduce National Mete- 
orological Center and Fleet Numerical Oceanog- 
raphy Center products. PRC-RCQUISITCS: MR 3222, 
MR 3230 (may be concurrent). 
MR 3240 Radar Meteorology (3-0). 
Principles of radar meteorology. Topics covered 
include radar systems, meteorological radar equa- 
tion, doppler radar basics, propagation, attenua- 
tion, precipitation and velocity estimation, and 
characteristic echoes. PRCRCQUISITCS: MR 3222 
and MR 3522. 

MR 3250 Tropical Meteorology (3-0). 
Structure and mechanisms of synoptic-scale wave 
disturbances, cloud clusters, upper-tropospheric 
systems, the intertropical convergence zone, trop- 
ical cyclones and monsoon circulations; with em- 
phasis on tropical cyclones, tropical scale analysis 
and energetics. PRCR6QUISITCS: MR 4322. MR 
3230, MR 3235 (may be concurrent). 

MR 3252 Tropical Meteorology/ Laboratory (3-4). 
Same as MR 3250 plus laboratory sessions on 
analysis of tropical systems emphasizing stream- 
line and isotach analysis and incorporating aircraft 
and satellite observations. Cxercises stress tropical 
cyclone structure, tropical general circulation and 
the monsoon regimes. Satellite imagery are used 
as an analysis tool and also in forecasting tropical 
cyclone intensity. R track forecasting exercise pro- 
vides an exposure to the use of various dynamic, 
climatological and statistical forecast models. PR6- 
RCQUISITtS: MR 4322, MR 3230, MR 3235 (may be 
concurrent). 

MR 3254 Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory (3-2). 
Same as MR 3250, plus laboratory sessions stress- 
ing tropical general circulation, satellite interpreta- 
tion and tropical cyclone structure. Tropical sum- 
mary briefs and tract forecasting exercises pro- 
vide an understanding of the tropical cyclone warn- 
ing system and the uses of various dynamical, cli- 
matological and statistical forecast models. PR6- 
R6QUISIT6S: enrollment in Operational Oceanog- 
raphy Curriculum or consent of Chairman, MR 4322, 
either MR 3230 and MR 3235 (may be concurrent) 
or MR 3234 (may be concurrent). 



157 



M€T€OROLOGV 



MR 3260 Operational Atmospheric Prediction 

Subjective and objective methods of atmospheric 
prognosis and techniques for forecasting opera- 
tionally-important weather elements from surface 
to 100 mb. Interpretation, use and systematic 
errors of computer-generated products. UUeather 
satellite briefs and applications of forecasting prin- 
ciples to current situations. PR6RCQUISIT6S: MR 
3230, MR/OC 4323 or consent of Instructor. 



MR 3262 Operational Atmospheric Prediction/ 
Laboratory (3-3). 

Same as MR 3260 plus laboratory sessions on the 
application of lecture material. Rlso, practice in 
uueather briefing, including diagnosis and forecast- 
ing of current uueather situations using uueather 
satellite observations and National Meteorolog- 
ical Center and Fleet Numerical Oceanography Cen- 
ter products. PRCR6QUISIT6S: MR 3230, MR/OC 
4323 or consent of Instructor. 



MR 3321 Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics (4-0). 
The hydrodynamical equations for a rotating strati- 
fied fluid. Forces, kinematics, boundary conditions, 
scale analysis. Simple balanced flouus; baroclinicity, 
thermal uuind; vorticity and divergence: rotational 
and divergent part of the uuind; circulation theorem. 
Vorticity and potential vorticity. PR6RC-QUISIT6: MR 
2047 (may be concurrent), or equivalent. 



MR 3420 Atmospheric Thermodynamics (3-0). 
The physical variables; properties of gases, water 
and moist air; equations of state and the laws of 
thermodynamics applied to the atmosphere; 
adiobatic processes and potential temperature,- 
meteorological thermodynamic diagrams,- geopo- 
tential and hydrostatic equilibrium, vertical motion 
in the atmosphere, stability criteria and condensa- 
tion levels. PR6R6QUISIT6: MR 1 1 1 6 or equivalent 
(May be taken through Continuing education as 
mini-course, MR 34 1 8- 1 9). 

MR 3421 Cloud Physics (3-0). 

Basic principles of cloud and precipitation physics 

and application to weather modification. Selected 

topics in atmospheric pollution. PRC-R6QUISITC: MR 

3420. 



MR 3445 Oceanic and Atmospheric Observational 
Systems (2-2). 

Principles of measurement: sensors, data acquisi- 
tion systems, calibration, etc. Methods of measure- 
ment for thermodynamic and dynamic variables in 
the ocean and atmosphere, including acoustics and 
optics. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: OC 3230 and MR 3420. 



MR 3520 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and 
Ocean (4-0). 

Principles of radiative transfer and satellite sensors 
and systems; visual, infrared and microwave radi- 
ometry and radar systems; application of satellite 
remotely-sensed data in the measurement of 
atmospheric and oceanic variability. PRCRCQUI- 
SITCS: Undergraduate physics and differential/inte- 
gral calculus, ordinary differential equations or con- 
sent of instructor. 

MR 3522 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and 
Ocean/Laboratory (4-2). 

Same as MR 3520 plus laboratory sessions on the 
concepts considered in the lecture series. PRCR6Q- 
UISITCS: Undergraduate physics and differential/ 
integral calculus, ordinary differential equations 
or consent of Instructor. 

MR 3540 Radiative Processes in the Atmosphere 

(3-0). 

Rpplications of radiation theory to atmospheric 
energy budgets, general circulation and anthro- 
pogenic climate changes. Radiational imbalance at 
the surface leading to heat fluxes and temperature 
changes in atmosphere and earth. Upper atmo- 
sphere phenomena (ozonosphere and ion- 
osphere). Radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, 
and optical phenomena. PRCR6QUISIT6S: MR 3420, 
MR 3520 or MR 3522. 

MR 3570 Operational Oceanography and Mete- 
orology (2-4). 

experience at sea in conducting oceanographic, 
meteorological, acoustical and other observations 
and analyses. Integration of satellite remote sens- 
ing information with in situ data and on-scene-pre- 
diction. Includes pre-cruise planning, real-time 
operational product interpretation and post-cruise 
analysis. PRC-RC-QUISITCS: MR 3222, MR/OC 3522; 
MR 441 6, OC 4267 and OC 4331 (may be concur- 
rent). 

Graduate Courses 

MR 4241 Mesoscale Meteorology (3-0). 
Descriptive and physical understanding of subsyn- 
optic-scale weather systems and their relation to 
the synoptic-scale environment. Rpplications to 
short-range and local-area forecasting utilizing 
satellite and numerical-model products relevant to 
mesoscale weather phenomena. PRCR6QUISITCS: 
MR 3230, MR/OC 4323, or MR 4322 with consent 
of Instructor. 

MR 4242 Advanced Tropical Meteorology (3-0) 
Theories and observations of equatorial waves 
and oscillations; energy sources and instabilities; 
boundary layer and cumulus convection parameter- 
ization,- monsoon circulations and their interactions 
with other scales; Tropical cyclone models and fore- 
casting; selected topics in diagnostic and theoreti- 
cal studies of tropical flows. PRC-R6QUISIT6: MR 
3250 and consent of Instructor. 



158 



M€T€OROLOGV 



MR 4250 Atmospheric Generol Circulation (3-0). 
The observed circulation. Zonal mean and eddy 
motions. Balances of momentum, heat, moisture. 
€nergetics. Maintenance of circulation. Zonally 
asymmetric circulations. Other selected topics of 
the general circulation of the atmosphere. PR6- 
R€QUISIT€: MR 4322 and consent of Instructor. 
MR 4322 Dynamic Meteorology (4-0). 
Pressure coordinates, scale analysis, perturbation 
method; solutions of equations of motion for sound, 
gravity and synoptic waves; baroclinic and baro- 
tropic instability; energetics; geostrophic adjust- 
ment. PRCR6QUISIT6: MR 3420, MR/ OC 3321, MR 
2047, MR 2121 or equivalent. 
MR 4323 Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling (4-2). 
Numerical models of atmospheric and ocean- 
ographic phenomena, finite difference techniques 
for solving hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic equa- 
tions, linear and nonlinear computational instabil- 
ity. Spectral and finite element models. Filtered and 
primitive equation prediction models. Sigma coor- 
diates. Objective analysis and initialization. Mois- 
ture and heating as time permits. PRC-R6QUISITC-S: 
MR 4322, MR 3132; MR 3232 desirable. 
MR 4324 Advanced Numerical Weather Prediction 
(3-0). 

Initialization, boundary conditions; sensible, latent 
and radiative heat transfer; simulation of sub-grid 
scale processes such as convection and friction; 
spectral methods and finite element models, gen- 
eral circulation models, PRCRCQUISIT6: MR/OC 
4323 or consent of Instructor. 
MR 4331 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I 
(3-0). 

Advanced topics in the dynamics of the atmo- 
sphere and the oceans including scale analysis; 
geostrophic adjustment; dispersion, and barotropic 
and baroclinic instabilities. PR6R6QUISIT6: consent 
of Instructor. 

MR 4332 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Dynamics II 

(3-0). 

€nergetics of unstable disturbances; frontogen- 
esis; boundary layer analysis with application to 
the €kman layer and to the frictional and the non- 
linear ocean boundary currents; finite amplitude 
baroclinic waves. PRCRC-QUISIT6: consent of Instruc- 
tor. 

MR 441 3 Air/Sea Interaction (4-0). 
Fundamental concepts in turbulence. The atmo- 
spheric planetary boundary layer, including surface 
layer and bulk formulae for estimating air-sea 



fluxes. The oceanic planetary boundary layer in- 
cluding the dynamics of the well-mixed surface lay- 
er. Recent papers on large-scale air-sea inter- 
action. PRCR6QUISITC-: OC 3240 or MR 4322 (may 
be concurrent), or consent of Instructor. 

MR 4414 Advanced Air/Sea Interaction (3-0). 
Rdvanced topics in the dynamics of the atmospher- 
ic and oceanic planetary boundary layers. PRC-RCQ- 
UISITC-: MR/OC 4413 or consent of Instructor. 

MR 4415 Atmospheric Turbulence (3-0). 
Approaches for defining the structure of the turbu- 
lent atmospheric boundary layer. Review of statis- 
tical descriptions of atmospheric turbulence; aver- 
aging, moments, joint moments, spectral represen- 
tation. €quations for a turbulent regime in a strat- 
ified, shear flow. Scaling parameters and similarity 
theories for surface layer profiles, spectra,- 
Kolmogorov hypotheses, Monin-Obukhov stability 
length. Measurement of atmospheric turbulence. 
Examination of observed spectra and scales of 
atmospheric turbulence. PRCRCQUISIT6S: MR/OC 
31 50 or consent of Instructor. 

MR 4416 Atmospheric Factors in electromagnetic 
and Optical Propagation (4-0). 
Principles of microwave and optical wave propaga- 
tion in the atmosphere, effects of atmosphere on 
propagation; refraction, scattering, attenuation, 
ducting, etc. PR6RCQUISIT6: MR/OC 441 3 (may be 
concurrent). 

MR 4520 Topics in Satellite Remote Sensing (3-0). 
Selected topics in the advanced application of sat- 
ellite remote sensing to the measurement of atmo- 
spheric and oceanic variables. PR6R6QUISITC: 
MR/OC 3522. 

MR 4800 Advanced Topics in Meteorology ( 1 -0 to 
4-0). 

Rdvanced topics in various aspects of meteorol- 
ogy. Topics not covered in regularly offered 
courses. The course may be repeated for credit as 
topics change. PR6RC-QUISIT6: Consent of Depart- 
ment Chairman and Instructor. 

MR 4900 Special Topics in Meteorology (1-0 to 
4-0). 

Directed study of selected areas of meteorology to 
meet the needs of the individual student. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6: Consent of Department Chairman and In- 
structor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 



159 



NATIONAL S6CURI7Y AFFAIRS 



D€PfiRTM€NTOF 
NATIONAL S€CURITV AFFAIRS 



Acting Chairman: 

James John Tritten, Commander, USN, 
and Assistant Professor, 
Code 56Tr, Root Hall, Room 100, 
(408) 646-2521, AV 878-2521. 



The Department of National Security Affairs 
offers programs of study in three major fields, 
supporting eight different curricula. The three 
major fields encompass Geographic Area 
Studies, Strategic Planning and Intelligence. 
The area studies are subdivided into five 
groups as follows: 

Middle Cast, Africa and South Asia 
Far Cast, Southeast Asia and The Pacific 
Curope and USSR 
Western Hemisphere 
International Organizations and 
Negotiations 
Individual programs in the Area Studies focus 
on one of the subregions listed or contain a 
blend of all subregions in the area. Included 
in the Area Studies program is a program of 
study in a language of the area at the De- 
fense Language Institute, located in Mon- 
terey. 

The field of Strategic Planning is sub- 
divided into General Strategic Planning and 
Nuclear Strategic Planning. Individual pro- 
grams focus on the evolutionary history of the 
planning process, strategies for national 
security, naval and maritime strategy, and 
management and planning systems. 

The Intelligence Curriculum is an interdisci- 
plinary program which integrates political sci- 
ence, mathematics, operations analysis, 
oceanography, aeronautical engineering, 
electrical engineering, physics, information 
systems, and managerial economics into an 
understanding of intelligence. Approximately 
half of the coursework in this technical (non- 
engineering) curriculum is undertaken in 
Naval Postgraduate School academic depart- 
ments under the Dean of Science and engi- 
neering; the remaining courses are in the in- 
formation and policy sciences. 



Courseuuork addresses three broad fields: 
defense technology, analysis and manage- 
ment, and national security affairs. The de- 
fense technology courses are designed to 
address the special problems of technical in- 
telligence, emphasizing technical literacy and 
the ability to communicate concerning techno- 
logical and environmental problems. This 
sequence seeks to provide the perspective 
that will assist assessment of the reality and 
significance of technical and environmental 
data, as well as ensure familiarity with the 
resources in these fields that may be applied 
to intelligence problems. 

The analysis and management coursework 
provides the student with a grounding in 
quantitative techniques, substantive re- 
search methods, and the concepts of re- 
source management. Students are intro- 
duced by various means to structure given 
problems, formulate possible solutions, orga- 
nize and compile supporting data, assess the 
reliability, and communicate the significance 
of the results obtained. 

Graduate courses in National Security 
Affairs outline the interface between inter- 
national politics, national security objectives, 
resource management and weapons tech- 
nology. The sequence synthesizes the politi- 
cal, technological, economic, cultural, social 
and ideological forces that influence the 
actors in the international system and models 
varying scenarios of interaction between 
them. 

D€PRRTM€NTRl R€QUIR€M€NTS 

FOR TH€ D€GR€€ MRSTCR OF 

SCI€NC€ IN NRTIONRL SECURITY 

RFFRIRS 

The degree Master of Science in National 
Security Affairs will be awarded upon the 
completion of an interdisciplinary program 
carried out in accordance with the following 
degree requirements: 

a. A minimum of 45 quarter hours of grad- 
uate level work of which at least 1 2 hours 
must represent courses at the 4000 level. 
Graduate courses in at least three different 
academic disciplines must be included and, in 



160 



NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS 



two disciplines a course at the 4000 level 
must be included. 

b. In addition to the 45 hours of course 
credit, an acceptable thesis must be com- 
pleted. 

c. The program must be approved by the 
Chairman of the Department of National 
Security Affairs. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

NS 001 0, 0020, 0030 and 0040, are Seminars for 
National Security Affairs Students in the Intelli- 
gence, Functional Speciality, Area Speciality, and 
all NSA curricula respectively (0-0). NS 001 2: Intro- 
duction to NPS Computer Systems for Intelligence 
( 1 -1 ), NS 0042: Micro Computer Utilization (2-2 are 
special six and three weeks pre-entry courses, 
respectively. 

NS 08 10 Thesis Research (0-0). 

Students conducting thesis research will enroll in 
this course. 

NS 081 1 Preparation for Comprehensive examina- 
tion (0-0). 

Students preparing for comprehensive examina- 
tions will enroll in this course. 

Lower Division Courses 

NS 1 500 American Life and Institutions (3-0). 
American political institutions and the political, 
social, economic, and cultural aspects of American 
Life. OP€N TO ALLICD OFFICERS. Graded on Pass/ 
Fail basis only. 

NS 21 54 Intelligence and the Military (4-0). 
An overview of the intelligence structure and a sur- 
vey of the intelligence process focusing on the ap- 
plication of intelligence to the military mission. The 
organization and functions of the various elements 
of the intelligence community are presented. 
Primary emphasis is placed on the use of intelli- 
gence by military decision makers. Included are 
overviews of systems supporting the collection, 
production and dissemination of intelligence. The 
course is intended for the non-intelligence special- 
ist and is available to any student wishing to learn 
about the intelligence community and its ability to 
provide support to the military. 

Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

NS 301 Comparative Analysis and Research Meth- 
ods (4-0). 

An analytical and comparative study of the form 
and functioning of the major types of contemporary 
governments, with emphasis on the policymaking 
process and research methods. Graded on Pass/ 
Fail basis only. 



NS 3020 Analysis of International Relations (4-0). 
A theoretical systematicanalysisof international re- 
lations and a study of factors, organizational strat- 
egies, and techniques of international politics, to in- 
clude a segment on cross-national security assis- 
tance and arms transfers. 

NS 3030 American National Security Policy (4-0). 
An institutional and functional analysis of the na- 
tional and international factors which shape U.S. 
defense policy. Attention in the course is focused 
on two major areas; 1 ) the decision-making pro- 
cess, including the legislative-executive budget- 
ary process, as well as the influence of bureacratic 
politics and interest group participation upon de- 
fense decisions; 2) the problems of strategic 
choice, including security assistance, threat anal- 
ysis, net assessment, deterrence theory, and 
limited war. 

NS 3040 The Politics of Global €conomic Relations 

(4-0). 

An integrated analysis on the economic and politi- 
cal factors that together determine national and 
international economic arrangements. The student 
first addresses the general principles of public fi- 
nance as a prerequisite for the analysis of budgets 
and policy priorities in specific countries and areas. 
The remainder of the course is concerned with the 
changing world economic order including issues 
such as trade, aid, crossnational security assis- 
tance, multi-national corporations technology and 
strategic resources. 

NS 3150 Intelligence Data Analysis and Research 
Methods (4-2). 

A survey of methods and techniques for synthesis, 
analysis, interpretation, and reporting of data. Top- 
ics include sampling methods, content analysis, 
data handling and processing, scaling techniques, 
and parametric and non-parametric tests, with 
emphasis on application to intelligence. PR6R6Q- 
UISITCS: OS 3101, MA 2311 or equivalent. TOP 
S6CR6T Clearance with eligibility for SP6CIAL INT6L- 
LIGCNCC information. 

NS 3151 Intelligence Systems and Products (4-0). 
This course is intended for students in the command 
and control program. It provides an introduction to 
intelligence systems and products which support 
command decision making, on overview of Soviet 
command and control concepts and practices re- 
quired for an appreciation of the significance of 
intelligence reporting, an insight into intelligence 
procedures to provide perspective for operational 
security planning, and material on Soviet intelli- 
gence organizations and capabilities. PRCRCQUI- 
SITCS: TOP SCCRCT clearance with eligibility for 
SI/SAO, U.S. Citizenship. SP6CIAL INTCLLIG6NCC 
information. 



161 



NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS 



NS 3152 Naval Warfare and the Threat environ- 
ment (4-0). 

This course supports NPS warfare curricula. It con- 
centrates on the threat posed by Sovier naval war- 
fare forces to successul accomplishment of the U.S. 
Navy's missions. Issues include: U.S. missions in con- 
flict situations: U.S. intelligence and analysis of the 
Soviet threat; the politico-military and strategic 
contexts underlying the use of Soviet naval and 
other forces for maritime warfare; current status 
and trends in Soviet naval warfare capabilities; 
continuities and changes in the missions and op- 
erations of Soviet naval and related forces; trends 
in the superpower naval warfare balance. Secret 
Clearance required. 

NS 3230 Strategic Planning and U.S. National 
Security Policy (4-0). 

The focus of this course will be on long term stra- 
tegic planning and will include such topics as: Stra- 
tegic Goal Rnalysis, national and transnational 
power assessment, analysis of the decision making 
and administrative processes at the national level, 
indigenous constraints on the policy process, fore- 
casting and future research techniques and the ap- 
plication of the concepts of strategic planning to 
the national defense effort. PRCRCQUISITC: NS 
3030. 

NS 3231 Maritime Strategy (4-0). 
The concentration of this course is on historical cases 
of maritime versus continental powers and the con- 
flict between the U.S. and the USSR with respect to 
maritime forces, geography and political interests. 
It complements the operational ideas of navies pre- 
sented in NS 3252. 

NS 3250 Defense Resources Allocation (4-1). 
R presentation of the concepts, principles and 
methods of defense resources allocation as they 
pertain to planning, programming, budgeting and 
related activities. €mphasis is placed on the analyt- 
ical aspects of decision making drawn from the 
disciplines of management theory, economics and 
quantitative analysis. The laboratory sessions in- 
clude problems and case studies in which the con- 
cepts and methods are applied to illustrative situa- 
tions. PRCRCQUISITICS: Consent of Instructor. 
Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 

NS 3251 Maritime Powers and Foreign Policy 

(4-0). 

R comparison of the historical evolution, political 
uses and operational ideas of the navies of the 
United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, 
Russia/Soviet Union and Japan. The principal goal 
of the seminar is to examine how the great mari- 
time powers of the world created the political 
basis for their naval power and the effect these 
fleets have had upon the nature of foreign policy 
and strategy. R comparison of the rise of the 
German and Russian/Soviet navies is most striking 
in this connection. PRCRCQUISITC: NS 3030 or con- 
sent of Instructor. 



NS 3263 Strategic Planning for Southwest Asia 

(4-0). 

examination of the political and military factors 

necessary for consideration in the development of 

a successful Western strategy for the defense of 

Rsia. 

NS 3279 Directed Studies in Notional Security 
Affairs (Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive assigned readings, individual discussions with 
the instructor, papers and/or examinations. 
NS 3280 Nudear Weapons and Foreign Policy 
(4-0) 

Rn interdisciplinary course which covers both the 
technology and political influences of nuclear 
weapon systems. The course emphasizes the inter- 
action of nuclear weapon systems with the foreign 
policies of the major powers and the political blocs 
from 1945 to present. 

NS 3300 Foundations of Middle €astern Politics: 
People, Societies, Cultures and Religions (4-0). 
Rn intensive course in Middle €astern history from 
the viewpoint of geographical and military factors 
which hove shaped the course of events in the 
area. The geographic (including oceanographic) 
environment within which military campaigns have 
been conducted, which continues to present mili- 
tary problems, is examined. Indigenous and foreign 
techniques and tactics for dealing with this environ- 
ment, as well as the historical development of Mid- 
dle €astern military organizations are studied. 

NS 3310 Problems of Government and Security in 
Middle €ost (4-0). 

Rn introductory course in Middle 6astern society 
and politics designed to provide the maximum 
background area knowledge to be utilized in 
follow-on courses in Middle Castern politics. 

NS 3320 International Relations and Security in the 
Middle €ast (4-0). 

The course focuses on selected problems affecting 
Rmerican security interests in the Middle €ast: 
Strategic waterways, including the Suez Canal, the 
Turkish Straits, and the Indian Ocean; the politics 
and problems of access to the area's oil resources; 
the development of U.S. and Soviet policies toward 
area. The foregoing problems will be set in the con- 
text of regional international politics. 

NS 3330 United States Interests and Policies in the 
Middle Cast (4-0). 

This course offers an analysis of the historical back- 
grounds and the current status of United States 
cultural, econimic, political and strategic interests in 
the Middle Cast. It traces the changing definitions 
of these interests over time and the alternative 
policies which ave been adopted in order to secure 
them. The relationship of these policies to broader 
aspects of United States foreign policy is discussed 
along with the impact of the policy-making process 
upon the substance of policies. 



162 



NATIONfll S6CURITY RFFRIRS 



NS 3341 Seminar on Middle Cost Oil (4-0). 
Rn examination of the oil resources of the Middle 
€ast for their impact upon the internal, regional and 
international policies of region-states. The role of 
international oil companies, consuming states, and 
organizations of exporting countries is studied. Dif- 
ference in oil resources and revenues are examined 
and related to different developmental and inter- 
national policies. The past and future use of oil as a 
political uueapon is discussed and evaluated. The 
use of revenues from oil is examined for its impact 
on levels of development and the regional military 
balance. 



NS 3350 The Middle €a$t: The Military Dimension 

(4-0). 

Rn examination of the political, sociological, cultural 
and strategic roles of the military in Middle €astern 
history and politics. Rmong the topics considered 
are: traditional military patterns, military recruit- 
ment, organization, doctrine, and learning experi- 
ences. 



NS 3360 North Africa : Problems of Government 
and Security in the Maghreb (4-0). 
This course is designed to extend the student's 
knowledge of selected North Rfrican and Red Sea 
littoral countries, and to provide some insight into 
the security problems presented by their domestic 
politics. In addition, some coverage of central 
Rfrican countries will be included. 



NS 3361 Problems of Government and Security in 
Israel (4-0). 

Israeli cultural, social, and political patterns: 
Hebraic traditions, Zionism and the creation of 
Israel, institutional and sociological frameworks for 
Israeli politics, elite recruitment, perceptions and 
strategic orientations, security issues in Israeli do- 
mestic and foreign policy. PRCRCQUISITCS: NS 331 
or NS 3301, or their equivalent. 

NS 3362 Problems of Government and Security in 
the Northern Tier: Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, 
Pakistan (4-0). 

Rn examination of internal and external political, 
economic, and social forces in the major non-Rrab 
Middle Castern states as reflected in their internal 
development and international policies. Coopera- 
tion and conflict in the behavior of these nations 
toward each other will be explored in the context of 
their recent efforts at regional cooperation and re- 
gional organization (the Sa'dabad Pact, Cento, and 
RCD). examination of their relationships to the ma- 
jor outside powers interested in the area, i.e., the 
U.S. and the Soviet Union. Their relationships both 
as individual states and as sub-region with the 
Rrab states of the Middle Cast. PRCRCQUISITCS: NS 
3310 and NS 3320. 



NS 3379 Directed Studies: Middle €ast (Credit 

Open). 

Format and content vary by student and professor 

agreement. Normally involves extensive assigned 

readings, individual discussions with the instructor, 

papers and/or examinations. 

NS 3400 Domenstic Context of Soviet National 
Security Policy (4-0). 

Rn examination of the role of domestic factors 
shaping Soviet national security policy: geography, 
military and economic capabilities, historical in- 
fluences and traditions, nationalities and demogra- 
phy, ideological influences, and political and eco- 
nomic systems. Cmphasis is on the impact of the do- 
mestic environment on current Soviet national se- 
curity policy-making with implications for the United 
States. 

NS 3410 Soviet National Security (4-0). 
A follow-up course to NS 3400. 

Primary focus is on Soviet images of national se- 
curity and long trends in the development of na- 
tional security policy since UJorld UJar II through the 
leaderships of Stalin, Khruschev and Brezhnev, and 
thereafter. Soviet efforts to safeguard their nation- 
al security objectives are demonstrated through a 
comparative analysis of crisis management situa- 
tions at their periphery (intervention and coercion 
of Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Rfghanistan and 
Poland) and in strategic areas of the Third UJorld 
(Cuban missile crisis and conflict and war in the 
Middle Cast, Rngola, Cthiopia and Central Rmerica). 
Implications are drawn for U.S. security. PRC- 
RCQUISITCS: NS 3400 or consent of Instructor. 

NS 3450 Soviet Military Strategy (4-0). 
examination of international and external factors 
conditioning Soviet military doctrine and strategy 
and their development through the Stalin, Khru- 
schev and Brezhnev eras and beyond. Cmphasis is 
on contemporary Soviet strategic concepts and 
strategy: surprise and deception, war-fighting 
capabilities, external role of the Soviet armed 
forces, strategy for nuclear war, UJarsaw Treaty 
Organization strategy, and Soviet naval strategy in 
the Third UJorld. 

NS 3452 Soviet Naval and Maritime Strategy (4-0). 
examination of t he roles played by the Soviet 
Navy, Merchant Marine, Fishing Fleet, and Oceano- 
logical establishment in securing the objectives of 
the Soviet Government. Topics include: geographic 
factors affecting Soviet ocean strategies; non- 
naval stratedy trends; international and domestic 
factors affecting post- 1953 naval strategy, de- 
velopment of Soviet naval warfare capabilities; 
doctrinal and functional analysis of post- 1953 
trends in naval strategy; command structure; per- 
sonnel training; law of the sea positions; U.S.- 
Soviet naval interaction. PRCRCQUISITC: TOP 
SCCRCT clearance with eligibility for SPCCIRL INTCLLI- 
GCNCC information. 



163 



NRTIONAl S6CURITV RFFRIRS 



NS 3460 Problems of Government ond Security in 
€ostern €urope (4-0). 

This course analyzes the political economic, nation- 
al security and international affairs of the commu- 
nist-ruled states of Curope other than the Soviet 
Union. 

NS 3479 Directed Studies: Soviet Union (Credit 
Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive assigned readings, individual discussions with 
the professor, papers and/or examinations. 

NS 3500 Perspectives on American Civilization 

(4-0). 

This course, especially designed for the foreign 
area studies (attache) program, is an interdisciplin- 
ary study of American culture, involving the political 
economic, social, philosophical and literary de- 
velopment of the Nation from 1 789 to the present. 

NS 3501 History and Culture of Latin America 
(4-0). 

Identifies those aspects of the heritage most rele- 
vant to understanding contemporary conditions in 
Latin America, f rom pre-Columbian Indian traditions 
and Iberian colonial patterns through the indepen- 
dence movements of the early 1 9th century and 
the global economic relationships which reoriented 
the region toward Northwestern Curope and the 
United States. 

NS 351 Problems of Government and Security in 
Latin America (4-0). 

Considers the nature of political legitimacy in Latin 
America. Comparative studies indicate the relative 
role of revolutionary movements, constitutionalism, 
and economic output as sources of social cohesion. 
Major political factors such as technocrats, orga- 
nized labor, the church, political parties and the 
military are studied in reference to how they re- 
spond to demand for radical change. Critical analy- 
sis of government capacity to meet challenges indi- 
cates the degree to which countries in the region 
face a significant likelihood of instability stemming 
from internal and/or external sources. Specific 
countries are given attention based on the future 
assignments of the students. 

NS 3520 International Relations and Security 
Problems of Latin America. (4-0). 
Surveys the attempts by countries from various 
parts of the world— including the Soviet bloc— to 
penetrate Latin America. The influences of cultural 
and economic ties, military soles and political sub- 
version have created links between Latin America 
and Curope with on undercurrent of African rela- 
tions. The activities coming from outside the region 
are evaluated in comparison with the efforts of 
Latin American states to gain diplomatic influence 
in global organizations and to establish economic 
links to serve development goals. 



NS 3530 United States Interests in Latin America 

(4-0). 

A critical look at Latin America, and at t he case 
made by analysts who argue that U.S. policy has 
neglected the region as compared with that of the 
critics of U.S. influence. Traditional views of neigh- 
bors sharing a common heritage and geo-political 
interest are evaluated. The importance of cultural, 
economic, and military ries ore considered in the 
context of American global economic and security 
concerns. 

NS 3540 Political economy of Latin American 
Development Strategies (4-0). 
examination of the forces affecting the interface of 
economic and political interests in development 
strategies, especially since the end of LUorld LUar II. 
The objectives sought, obstacles encountered, and 
means utilized are evaluated, external and internal 
factors are compared in reference both to measura- 
ble contributions and to the perceptions of Latin 
American leaders. 

NS 3550 The Role of the Military in Latin America 

(4-0). 

A broad view of the variety of functions served by 
the military in Latin American societies. Many Latin 
American military organizations have had training 
and advisory links with several countries from the 
outside region. A number of countries have also de- 
veloped comprehensive doctrines of both military 
and other activities as part of research and training 
at advanced staff schools. Some have overseas 
combat experience, while many have been in- 
volved in internal security operations. These factors 
are considered by this course along with interser- 
vice and civil-military relations. 



The 357X sequence consists of a series of directed 
studies of particular subareas of Latin America. 
Cach individual course description corresponds to 
that given below for NS 3570. 

NS 3570 Directed Studies: Latin America (Credit 
Open). 

format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive assigned readings, individual discussions with 
the instructor, papers and/or examination. 

NS 3571 Directed Studies: Canada (Credit Open). 

NS 3572 Directed Studies: Brazil (Credit Open). 

NS 3573 Directed Studies: Southern Cone 
Countries (Credit Open). 

NS 3574 Directed Studies: Andean Region (Credit 
Open). 

NS 3575 Directed Studies: Cuba (Credit Open). 

NS 3576 Directed Studies: Mexico (Credit Open). 



164 



NATIONAL S6CURITY AFFAIRS 



NS 3577 Directed Studies: Central America and the 
Caribbean (Credit Open). 

NS 3579 Directed Studies: Western Hemisphere 
(Credit Open). 

NS 3600 Geography, History and Cultures of Asia 

(4-0). 

An introduction to Asia. This basic course addresses 
the peoples of Asia and their cultures, civilizations, 
social organization, economic, political and military 
development before the coming of Europeans. This 
course is a prerequisite for the advanced courses 
on Asia. 



NS 3620 International Conflicts of Asia to World 
War II (4-0). 

An analysis of the impact of the West on the 
peoples of Asia, shouuing the historical roots of 
many contemporary conflicts of policy. 



NS 3630 Foundations of U.S. Policy in Asia (4-0). 
A study of 19th and early 20th century U.S. inter- 
ests and policy touuard Asia. Focuses on the emer- 
gence of Asian affairs as an issue for American 
policy-makers and the public from the U.S. revolu- 
tion through World War II. €mphasis is placed on 
tracing Asian-American political, economic, stra- 
tegic, and cultural interaction as it influenced U.S. 
policy and the policies of key Asian states. 



NS 3663 Problems of Government and Security of 
Contemporary Korea (4-0). 
Division of the Korean nation into two states; the 
aftermath of the Korean war; domestic political, 
economic and social problems of North Korea and 
South Korea,- the prospects for reunification; the 
military balance and the changing strategic en- 
vironment; the relations of Pyongyang and Seoul, 
with their key allies. 



NS 3664 Problems of Government and Security in 
Southeast Asia (4-0). 

Consideration given to such internal problems as 
the growth of nationalism, the role of overseas 
Chinese, and numerous other social changes, eco- 
nomic modernization, insurgencies, conflicting ide- 
ologies and the various types of government. Ex- 
ternal problems include the role of each nation 
state and regional groups in international affairs 
and the interests and policies of outside powers in 
dealing with the area. 



NS 3665 Problems of Government and Security in 
Australia, New Zealand and Melanesia (4-0). 
The politics, economics, and foreign relations of 
Australia, New Zealand, and Melanesian states. 
The emergence of new states, and the importance 
of the area's relations with the United States, the 
Commonwealth, Western Europe and ASEAN, 
ANZUS, The U.S. 



NS 3631 U.S. Security Interests and Policies in Asia 
since World War II (4-0). 

A study of the national interests of the United 
States in East Asia, South Asia and adjacent 
oceans from World War II to the present. The de- 
velopment of hostilities in Korea and Vietnam and 
their aftermath, evaluation of relations with the 
new Japan, the PAC and Taiwan, and the indepen- 
dent nations of Asia, produced by the breakup of 
traditional empires. 



NS 3661 Problems of Government and Security in 
China (4-0). 

The rise of the Chinese Communist Party and the 
establishment of the Communist state; its domestic 
achievements and problems; the special problem 
Taiwan; changing foreign policies and the current 
role of the Peoples Aepublic of China in world af- 
fairs. 



NS 3662 Problems of Government and Security of 
Contemporary Japan (4-0). 
The place of Japan in the modern world; and exam- 
ination of Japan's political dynamics, economic evo- 
lution, social transformation, the National Self De- 
fense Forces and alternatives for providing for 
national security. 



NS 3666 Problems of Government and Security in 
South Asia and the Indian Ocean Area (4-0). 
Internal problems and foreign relations among the 
states in the regions of South Asia and the Indian 
Ocean; the strategic interests of the major powers; 
the importance of the Indian Ocean to the United 
States, the Soviet Union and their respective allies. 

The NS 36 7X sequence consists of a series of di- 
rected studies of particular subareas of the Far 
Cast, Southeast Asia and Pacific. Cach individual 
course description corresponds to that given below 
for NS 3671. 



NS 3671 Directed Studies: China (Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive assigned readings, individual discussions with 
the instructor, papers and/or examinations. 



NS 3672 Directed Studies: Japan (Credit Open). 

NS 3673 Directed Studies: Korea (Credit Open). 

NS 3674 Directed Studies: Southeast Asia (Credit 
Open). 

NS 3675 Directed Studies: Australia and New 
Zealand (Credit Open). 



165 



NATIONAL S6CURITY AFFAIRS 



NS 3676 Directed Studies: South Rsio (Credit 
Open). 

NS 3679 Directed Studies: General Asia (Credit 
Open). 

NS 3700 History of €urope ond Russia, Pre 1917 

(4-0). 

Review ond analysis of the political and military re- 
history of 6urope, including Russia, from the con- 
gress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. 

NS 3701 History of €urope ond the USSR, Post 1917 

(4-0) 

This course continues the narrative and analysis 
begun in NS 3700, bringing the student from World 
War I and the Bolshevik Revolution to the conclu- 
sion of World War II. 

NS 3710 Problems of Government and Security in 
Contemporary Western €urope (4-0). 
Revieuu and analysis of the history of Western 
€urope since 1 945, including an introduction to the 
institutions of the €uropean economic Community 
and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.€mpha- 
sis on the political systems and security policies of 
Britain, France, Italy, and the Federal Republic of 
Germany. 

NS 3720 International Relations and Security Prob- 
lems of the North Rtlantic Alliance (4-0). 
The origins ond evolution of NATO in relation to the 
provided threat from the 6ast and the postwar re- 
covery of €urope. Problems of strategy, force pos- 
ture, alliance cohesion, nuclear policy and the dif- 
fering interests of NATO states. Current issues fac- 
ing the alliance and their relation to U.S. foreign 
and defense policy. 

NS 3760 Problems of Government and Security in 
the Mediterranean Region (4-0). 
This course provides an introduction to security pro- 
blems in the Mediterranean region, with special 
emphasis on U.S. and Soviet policy as well as on 
the governments of the northern littoral of the 
Mediterranean. 

NS 3761 Problems of Government and Security in 
the Scandinavian-Baltic Region (4-0). 

This course analyzes the political, economic, social 
and security problems faced by the Scandinavia- 
Baltic countries. The role they play on the northern 
flank of NATO will be examined as well as their 
position vis-a-vis the growing threat of Soviet mili- 
tary and naval power in the Baltic and Norwegian 
seas. 

NS 3762 Problems of Government and Security in 
the Federal Republic of Germany (4-0). 
The origins of the Federal Republic of Germany; 
political system, economy, and decision-making; 
central foreign policy problems, including relations 
with the U.S., the USSR, and the German Democratic 
Republic; the Bundeswehr and current security 



NS 3763 Problems of Government and Security in 
France (4-0). 

The Fourth and Fifth Republics in the context of 
French political history; political system economy, 
and decision-making,- central foreign policy prob- 
lems, including relations with the U.S., the USSR, the 
Federal Republic of Germany, and Africa,- the French 
armed forces and current security issues. 

The NS 377X sequence consists of a series of di- 
rected studies of particular subareas of Curope. 
Cach individual course description corresponds to 
that given below for NS 3770. 

NS 3770 Directed Studies: Mediterranean (Credit 
Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves ex- 
tensive assigned readings, individual discussions 
with the instructor, papers and/or examinations. 

NS 3771 Directed Studies: Scandinavia-via-Baltic 
(Credit Open). 

NS 3772 Directed Studies: Federal Republic of 
Germany (Credit Open). 

NS 3773 Directed Studies: France (Credit Open). 

NS 3774 Directed Studies: United Kingdom (Credit 
Open). 

NS 3775 Directed Studies: Italy (Credit Open). 

NS 3776 Directed Studies: Iberia (Credit Open). 

NS 3777 Directed Studies: Castern €urope (Credit 
Open). 

NS 3779 Directed Studies: General UJest €urope 
(Credit Open). 

NS 3800 History and Culture of Sub-Sohoran Africa 

(4-0). 

An examination of the major historical trends that 
have shaped African societies. Emphasis will be 
placed on the interaction between geography, cul- 
ture, economics and politics. The pre-colonial, and 
colonial periods in African history will be discussed 
in detail. This course is intended as a general intro- 
duction for the student just beginning the study of 
Africa. 

NS 3810 Problems of Government and Security in 
Sub-Saharan Africa (4-0). 

Emergence of independent African states from a 
shared colonial heritage, and their common prob- 
lems in developing viable modern nation-states. 
Patterns of international cooperation and conflict 
among African states, including discussions of 
African socialism, negritude, pan-Africanism, neu- 
tralism, and the continuing problem of South Afri- 
ca's future. Rival policies of outside powers, includ- 
ing the U.S., the Soviet Union, China and the former 
colonial powers. 



166 



NATIONAL S6CURITV nFFRIRS 



NS 381 1 Conflict ond Change in Africa (4-0). 
fin examination of the underlying cultural economic 
and political sources of conflict and change in Africa. 
Topics to be covered will include: irredentism, civil 
wars and boundary disputes, ethnic cleavages and 
political competition, modernization and political 
stability. These topics will be analyzed by examin- 
ing a series of case studies; the Congo crisis, the 
Nigerian civil war, the €ritrea conflict, the Shaba cri- 
sis and the Sudanese civil war. 

NS 3830 American Interests in Africa (4-0). 
This course examines the evolution of American re- 
lations w ith Africa from 1 960 to the present. It fo- 
cuses on the ways in which changing geopolitical 
and economic conditions have altered official per- 
ceptions of American interests in Africa - including 
the Mahgreb. U.S. involvement in conflicts in the 
Belgian Congo, Nigeria, Angola, Ahodesia and the 
Horn of Africa will be studied. 
NS 3840 African Political Development Strategies 
(4-0) 

An examination of the political modernization strat- 
egies adopted by post-independence govern- 
ments in Africa. Issues to be discussed will include: 
the role of political parties in Africa, socialism in 
Africa, and the like. Special emphasis will be placed 
on Africa's early post-independence problems and 
their effect on current African strategies. 

NS 3879 Directed Studies: African Area Studies 
(Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves ex- 
tensive assigned readings, individual discussions 
with the instructor, papers and/or examinations. 

NS 3900 International Organizations and Negotia- 
tions (4-0). 

The first part of the course traces the evolution of 
international organizations from the Concert of 
€urope, through the League of Nations, United 
Nations, €uropean economic Community and NATO, 
to current forms of organization such as multination- 
al corporations and transnational terrorist groups. 
The emphasis is on the policy-making process in 
these organizations and their interaction with 
nation-States and the international system. The 
second part of the course is on analysis of inter- 
national negotiations, with emphasis on applying 
theories of negotiation to such issues as conflict 
resolution and arms control. 

NS 3902 Modern Revolution and Political Terrorism 
(44). 

Study of the general historical framework of mod- 
ern revolution to include systematical analysis of 
the development of modern revolutionary situa- 
tions. C-xamination of the more important revolu- 
tions of modern times, including study of the histori- 
cal events, testing of the methods of systematic 
analysis, with emphasis on revolutionary tactics, 
e.g., political terrorism. 



NS 3960 International Low and the Law of LUar 

(4-0). 

An introduction to the principles of International 
Law including sovereignity, territory, recognition, 
the Law of the Sea, and the Laws of LUar. Special at- 
tention is paid to the 1949 Geneva Convention, 
the Navy's Law of Naval LUarfare and the Army's 
Law of Land LUarfare. 

NS 3962 Ocean, Maritime and Tort Law for the 
Hydrographic Community (4-0). 
This course is designed to provide a detailed intro- 
duction to the personal and institutional liabilities 
and immunities of the hydrographic community. As 
such, it will consist of a general introduction to gov- 
ernmental tort law, including the applicable sec- 
tions of the Federal Tort Claims Act and pertinent 
cases; relevant areas of Admiralty law and inter- 
national law, both public and private, as it applies 
to the rights and duties pertaining to access to, and 
use of both international and sovereign waters. In 
addition, special emphasis will be given to the 
historical and legal developments of the law of the 
sea; and to present day trends in international con- 
ventions leading up to the proposed law of the Sea 
Treaty. 

Graduate Courses 

NS 401 Seminar in Comparative Regional Security 

(4-0). 

A seminar designed for geographical security area 
students to address global security issues on a 
comparative basis. PACA6QUISITICS: NS 3310, 
3410, 3630, 3710 or 3810. 

NS 4020 Seminar in Comparative Foreign Policy 

(4-0). 

The objective of this Seminar is to develop the stu- 
dent's ability to analyze and predict the inter- 
national behavior of states. Cmphasis will be 
placed on comparing the impact of different factors, 
such as international structure, domestic politics, 
bureaucratic institutions, economic resources and 
ideology, on the foreign policies of different coun- 
tries. Students will be expected to write a seminar 
paper using the theoretical material covered in the 
course to compare the foreign policies of two or 
more countries. PA6ACQUISITC: NS 3020 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

NS 4040 Strategic Resources and U.S. National 
Security Policy (4-0). 

Analysis of the problems of access to global re- 
sources and their utilization: agricultural production 
access to critical raw materials, problems and pol- 
itics of oil; national and international implications of 
various strategies of self-sufficiency ond inter- 
dependency. Cmphasis is placed on the security 
problems arising from the geographic distribution 
of international resources. PA6A6QUISITCS: NS 
3030, NS 3020. 



167 



NATIONAL S6CURITV AFFAIRS 



NS 4041 economics of Third World Military expendi- 
tures (4-0). 

A comparative analysis of problems of politic- 
economic growth and development, focusing on se- 
lected developing nations. Alternate systems are 
compared with respect to development goals, 
theories of economic organization, institutions and 
development processes. €mphasis is placed on 
forecasts of likely changes in economic and political 
conditions and their effect on the political-military 
situation in each country. PR€R€QUISIT€: NS 3040 
or consent of the Instructor. 

NS 4042 Notional Security and Technology Transfer 

(4-0). 

€xamines patterns of €ast-UJest Trade, U.S. policies 
regarding technology transfer to the Castern bloc. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: NS 3040 or consent of the Instructor. 

NS 4079 Advanced Directed Studies in Notional 
Security Affairs (Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves ex- 
tensive individual research under direction of the 
instructor and submission of a substantial paper of 
graduate seminar quality and scope. 

NS 41 51 Comparative Command, Control, Commu- 
nications and Ocean Surveillance (3-0). 
An examination of the command and organizational 
structures, control philosophies, communications 
systems and ocean surveillance systems of the 
Soviet and U.S. Navies. The course begins with the 
Soviet approach, which is used as a basis of com- 
parison with the U.S. approach. Possible exploit- 
able features of the command and control structure 
are considered. The course emphasizes readings in 
the appropriate literature, research and seminar 
discussions. PRC-R€QUISIT€: TOP S€CR€T clearance 
with access to SP6CIAI INT€UJG€NC€ information; 
NS 3452, S6 2003, OS 3002 or equivalent. May 
also be taught as S€ 4064. 

NS 4152 Problems of Intelligence and Threat 

Analysis (4-0). 

This advanced course focuses on problems in ana- 
lyzing the intentions and capabilities of a military 
competitor, especially the Soviet Union. This course 
is specifically intended to draw on the knowledge 
and experience of practioners and analysts in the 
Naval intelligence community. Students will be 
given the opportunity to undertake analyses 
where they apply methods and concepts acquired 
in earlier courses. PR6R6QUISIT6: NS 3150 or NS 
31 54 or permission of the Instructor. Graded on a 
Pass/Fail basis only. TOP SC-CR6T clearance with 
eligibility for SPECIAL INT€LUG€NC€ information. 

NS 4179 Advanced Directed Studies: Intelligence 
(Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive individual research under the direction of a 
substantial paper of graduate seminar quality and 
scope. 



NS 4230 Seminar in Strategic Planning (4-0). 
Advanced study in the concepts and methods of 
long-range defense planning and analysis, particu- 
larly with respect to iterative aggregation and syn- 
thesis in the Military Departments, the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, the office of the Secretary of Defense and 
the National Security Council. Students are expect- 
ed to identify and address some evolving strategic 
issues which have significant long-term implications 
for the security of the U.S. PRCR6QUISIT6: NS 3230 
or permission of Instructor. Graded on a Pass/Fail 
basis only. 

NS 4231 Science, Technology and Public Policy 

(4-0). 

Advanced study and research in the role of science 
and technology in the formulation and conduct of 
U.S. national policy, to include interactions among 
scientific communities, government and the military 
services. A research focus will be determined for 
each course. PR6RC-QUISITC-: Consent of the Instruct- 
or. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. 

NS 4250 Problems of Security Assistance and Arms 
Transfer (4-0). 

An analysis of the patterns, purposes and effects of 
cross-national security assistance, including arms 
sales and the transfer of technology. Special topics 
include: factors dominating the arms transfer poli- 
cies of the major powers; the role of the military at- 
tache; the design, execution and evaluation of se- 
curity assistance programs. PR6R6QUISIT6S: NS 
3030 or NS 3020. 

NS 4251 American National Security Objectives 
and Net Assessment (4-0). 
Comparative analysis of trends in U.S. and Soviet 
security policies, military forces, manpower, and 
capabilities. Special attention is paid to familiariz- 
ing students with original source material and ma- 
terial and major elements in current controversial 
national security issues. Topics covered include nu- 
clear capabilities and doctrine, BMD and air de- 
fense, civil defense, combined arms employment, 
NATO UJarsaw Pact military balance, naval forces, 
and trends in the U.S. ond Soviet economies, espe- 
cially as they may affect the allocation of resources 
to defense. PR6RCQUISIT6: TOP S€CR€T clearance 
with eligibility for SP6CIAL INTCLLIG6NCC informa- 
tion. 

NS 4261 Survey of Strategic Studies (4-0). 
An extensive survey of the classical and contempo- 
rary literature on strategic thinking: national objec- 
tives and strategic alternatives; deterrence, coun- 
terforce, arms control, counter insurgency, compel- 
lence; components and rules of the international 
strategic system; arms competitions, nuclear pro- 
liferation, terrorism. Student projects on current 
strategic problems are a major component of the 
course. PRC-RC-QUISITC-: NS 3020. 



168 



NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS 



NS 4262 Seminar in Strategic Deception (4-0). 
This course explores the utility of strategic decep- 
tion in advancing military/political objectives from 
a variety of social scientific perspective; both his- 
torical case studies and contemporary issues will 
be considered. PACRCQUISITC: NS3230 or consent 
of Instructor. 

NS 4279 Advanced Directed Studies: Strategic 
Planning (Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive individual research under direction of the in- 
structor and submission of a substantial paper of 
graduate seminar quality and scope. 

NS 4280 Advanced Topics in Nudear Strategy and 
Deterrence (4-0). 

A follouu-up course to NS 3280 that examines ad- 
vanced issues in nuclear strategy, strategic and 
crisis stability, and deterrence. In addition to ad- 
vanced theoretical issues of deterrence, this course 
will specifically investigate the role and importance 
of nuclear force planning and strategy formulation 
to deterrence, stability, and foreign policy imple- 
mentation. Some of this analysis will be done using 
both static measurement models and dynamic com- 
puter nuclear exchange modeling. PACACQUISITC: 
NS 3280 or permission of the Instructor; SCCACT 
clearance. 

NS 4290 Seminar on the Origins of Soviet American 
Relations (4-0). 

This course examines the origins of contemporary 
U.S. and Soviet military and political relationships 
and focuses on the 1 945 to 1 963 time.period. Top- 
ics covered include theories of the Cold War (includ- 
ing orthodox, revisionist, post-revisionist, and neo- 
orthodox), Allied war-time diplomacy and contrast- 
ing post-war objectives, Cold War alliance strate- 
gies, formulation of American post-war foreign pol- 
icy, Soviet perspectives on the origins of U.S.-Soviet 
antagonisms, as well as de-colonization and the 
Cold War in Asia and the Near and Middle Cast. 
PR6RCQUISITC: NS 3030 or consent of the Instructor. 

NS 4300 Seminar in Middle €astrn Civilization 

(4-0). 

Description and analysis of the four major cultural 
traditions of the Middle Cast: Arabic, Persian, 
Judiac, and Turkish. Students read translations of 
selected classical and contemporary writings from 
each of these traditions, and secondary materials 
concerning social and cultural institutions. PACACQ- 
UISITCS: NS 331 or NS 3300, or consent of Instruc- 
tor. 

NS 431 Seminar in Security Problems of the Mid- 
dle Cast (4-0). 

Advanced Middle Castern politics and the security 
problems they present to the U.S. decision-makers. 
The central theme of the course is U.S. interests in 
the Middle Cast, how these interests are threat- 
ened, and what policy alternatives have been pro- 
posed to secure them. PRCRCQUISITC: NS 3310 or 
NS 3320. 



NS 4379 Advanced Directed Studies: Middle Cast 
(Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive individual research under direction of the in- 
structor and submission of a substantial paper of 
graduate seminar quality and scope. 

NS 441 Seminar in Soviet Security Problems (4-0). 
An advanced seminar for all students specializing in 
Soviet and Cast Curopean affairs designed to pro- 
vide an introduction to primary methodological ap- 
proaches for studying Soviet national security 
(macroanalytical, microanalytical, unitary actor, 
bureaucratic politics) and methodological tech- 
niques (content analysis, Kremlinology, mathemat- 
ical-statistical methods, and others). Course is also 
designed to provide students with an opportunity 
to engage in advanced study and research of spe- 
cialized topics relating to Soviet security problems 
in cooperation with the major Soviet study centers 
and leading Soviet scholars in the United States 
and abroad. PRCRCQUISITC: NS 3400, 3410 and 
3450. 

NS 4420 Security Problems and International Re- 
lations of the Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO) 
(4-0). 

An advanced study of structures and policy-making 
in the WTO countries and other communist coun- 
tries not having WTO membership, above all, China, 
Vugoslavia, Cuba and Vietnam. Focus on the origin 
and evolution of the WTO alliance, problems of 
joint strategy, alliance cohesion and reliability, dif- 
fering interests of various WTO members, conflict 
management wtihin the alliance and WTO mem- 
bers relations with other important Communists, 
NATO and Third World countries. Current issues 
such as the Soviet-Cuban joint intervention in Africa 
and involvement in the Caribbean basin, the Soviet 
alliance with Vietnam in Southeast Asia, Soviet- 
Cast German military-security operations in the 
Third World, and the dynamics of Sino-Soviet rela- 
tions are viewed with an eye to their implications 
for the United States. PRCRCQUISITCS: NS 3400, 
3410, and 3450, or consent of Instructor. 

NS 4451 Advanced Topics in Soviet Naval Affairs 

(4-0). 

Advanced study and research in Soviet naval and 
maritime affairs. Topics include: decision-making 
processes, scenarios, warfare capabilities and sup- 
port systems, missions,- and U.S.-Soviet naval inter- 
actions. PRCRCQUISITC: TOP SCCRCT clearance with 
eligibility for SPCCIAL INTCLLIGCNCC information. 

NS 4479 Advanced Directed Studies: Soviet Union 
(Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive individual research under direction of the in- 
structor and submission of a substantial paper of 
graduate seminar quality and scope. 



169 



NATIONfil S6CURITV fifffiIRS 



NS 4500 Seminar in the National Interest (4-0). 
An advanced study of the underlying assumptions 
and objectives of American security and foreign 
policy. The core of the course is an in-depth analy- 
sis of the American national interest in the inter- 
national context. Students are required to write a 
major seminar paper on American national inter- 
ests in a specific country or region. 

NS 4510 Seminar in Government and Politics in 
Latin America (4-0). 

This seminar will consist of intensive readings of ad- 
vanced topics in Latin American politics and govern- 
ment, including the interplay between economic, 
political, military, and social factors in the process 
of political change at play in the region. Students 
will be required to prepare classroom lectures on 
selected subjects and present an article length 
paper on a separate topic. Reading assignments 
will be extensive, which presupposes a significant 
level of knowledge and preparation prior to the 
course. PR€ RC-QUISITCS: NS 3510, 3520, 3540 and 
3550. 



NS 4576 Advanced Directed Studies: Mexico 
(Credit Open). 

NS 4577 Advanced Directed Studies: Central 
America and the Caribbean (Credit Open). 

NS 4579 Advanced Directed Studies: Western 
Hemisphere (Credit Open). 



NS 4660 Asia and Soviet Union (4-0). 
An advanced study of the interests and policies of 
the Soviet Union in Asia and the adjacent oceans, 
with special reference to the impact of Soviet ex- 
pansiveness on the policies of the United States, 
China, Japan and other Asian states. This course is 
open both to Soviet and Asian area specialists. 

The NS 46 7X sequence consists of a series of direc- 
ted studies of particular subareas of the For €ast. 
Southeast Asia and Pacific. 6ach individual course 
description corresponds to that given below for NS 
4671. 



NS 4560 Seminar in International Security Prob- 
lems of Latin America (4-0). 
Reviews the history of Latin America as part of on 
inter-American system, and the case of joint foreign 
policy action on economic, political, and military 
fronts. Case studies draw attention to the role of 
the United States in the region, both within the for- 
mal region institutions and in bilateral relations in- 
cluding military advisor activities. The relations are 
put in the context of the attitudes of Latin American 
leaders toward hemispheric solodarity. 



The 457X sequence consists of a series of directed 
studies of particular subareas of Latin America. 
6ach individual course description corresponds to 
that given below for NS 4570. 

NS 4570 Advanced Directed Studies: Latin America 
(Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive assigned readings, individual discussions with 
the instructor, papers and/or examination. 

NS 4571 Advanced Directed Studies: Canada 
(Credit Open). 

NS 4572 Advanced Directed Studies: Brazil (Credit 
Open). 

NS 4573 Advanced Directed Studies: Southern 
Cone Countries (Credit Open). 

NS 4574 Advanced Directed Studies: Andean 
Region (Credit Open). 

NS 4575 Advanced Directed Studies: Cuba (Credit 
Open). 



NS 4671 Advanced Directed Studies: China (Credit 
Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves ex- 
tensive assigned readings, individual discussions 
with the instructor, papers and/or examinations. 

NS 4672 Advanced Directed Studies: Japan (Credit 
Open). 

NS 4673 Advanced Directed Studies: Korea (Credit 
Open). 

NS 4674 Advanced Directed Studies: Southeast 
Asia (Credit Open). 

NS 4675 Advanced Directed Studies: Australia and 
New Zealand (Credit Open). 

NS 4676 Advanced Directed Studies: South Asia 
(Credit Open). 



NS 4679 Advanced Directed Studies in General 
Asia (Credit Open). 

Normally involves extensive individual research 
under direction of instructor and submission of sub- 
stantial paper of graduate seminar quality and 
scope. Designed for advanced study in one of the 
following areas: Japan, Korea, China, South or 
Southeast Asia. 



NS 4690 International Security Problems of Asia 
and the Adjacent Oceans (4-0). 
Advanced study of Asian security issues with spe- 
cial emphasis on the balance of forces, regional 
and external alliances, prospects for conflict, and 
Asian concepts of security and strategy. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6: Consent of Instructor. 



170 



NATIONAL S6CURITV AFFAIRS 



NS 4710 Seminar in Political and Security Problems 
of €urope (4-0). 

R research seminar on political and security issues 
in contemporary €urope. Students conduct and pre- 
sent original research on a selected issue, or re- 
lated issues, in specific €uropean countries or sub- 
regions. The issue around which the seminar is 
structured varies from term to term. It is chosen to 
meet the research interests of each group of stu- 
dents enrolled in the course. 
NS 4720 Seminar in Soviet-€uropean Relations 
(4-0). 

A seminar intended to deepen the student's know- 
ledge of current issues in Soviet and European 
affairs. 

The NS 477X sequence consists of a series of direc- 
ted studies of particular subareas of €urope. €ach 
individual course description corresponds to that 
given below for NS 4770. 

NS 4770 Advanced Directed Studies: Mediter- 
ranean (Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive assigned readings, individual discussions with 
the instructor, papers and/or examinations. 
NS 4771 Advanced Directed Studies: Scandinavian- 
via-Baltic (Credit Open). 

NS 4772 Advanced Directed Studies: Federal Re- 
public of Germany (Credit Open). 

NS 4773 Advanced Directed Studies: France (credit 
open). 

NS 4774 Advanced Directed Studies: United King- 
dom (Credit Open). 

NS 4775 Advanced Directed Studies: Italy (Credit 
Open). 

NS4776 Advanced Directed Studies: Iberia (Credit 
Open). 

NS 4777 Advanced Directed Studies: €astern 
€urope (Credit Open). 

NS 4779 Advanced Directed Studies: General West 
Europe (Credit Ooen). 
NS 4810 Current Problems in Africa (4-0). 
This course will examine the major problems and 
crises that have confronted African leaders since 
1 970. Particular attention will be paid to conflicts in 
Southern Africa. The OAU's role in conflict manage- 
ment will also be discussed. 

NS 4820 Advanced Seminar in Africa Studies (4-0). 
Advanced study and research in government, poli- 
tics, international relations and national security 
affairs in Sub-Saharan Africa. A continuing theme is 
the role of the military in African national and inter- 
national affairs and the implications of contem- 
porary crises for military-security concerns of the 
continent. PR€R€QUISIT€: NS 3830 or NS 3840. 



NS 4830 American Policy Towards Africa (4-0). 
The central theme of the course is U.S. interests in 
Africa, how these interests are threatened, and 
what policy alternatives have been proposed to 
secure them. Advanced African politics and the se- 
curity problems they present to U.S. decision- 
makers. PR€R€QUISIT€S: NS 3340. NS 3840 or NS 
3820. 

NS 4850 Role of the Military in Africa (4-0). 
Advanced study and research in government, poli- 
tics, international relations and national security 
affairs in Sub-Saharan Africa. A continuing theme is 
the role of the military in African national and inter- 
national affairs and the implications of contem- 
porary crises for military-security concerns of the 
continent. PR€R€QUISIT€: NS 3830 or NS 3840. 

NS 4879 Advanced Directed Studies: African Area 
Studies (Credit Open). 

Format and content vary. Normally involves exten- 
sive individual research under direction of the in- 
structor and submission of a substantial paper of 
graduate seminar quality and scope. 

NS 4900 Seminar in International Negotiations 
(4-0). 

Advanced study and research of the international 
negotiating process, designed to provide students 
with an opportunity to analyze specific topics re- 
lated to negotiating national security. 

NS 4901 Seminar in Ocean Policy (4.0). 
An advanced survey of the oceanographic, military, 
political and legal problems of the oceans. Among 
the topics dealth with are: comparative regional 
military oceanography, politics and strategy of 
fleet deployment, and international legal con- 
straints on naval operations. 

NS 4902 Seminar on Modern Revolution and Ter- 
rorism (4-0). 

A research seminar on modern revolution and ter- 
rorism. Students will be introduced to the general 
sources of information and accomplish the research 
necessary to complete a seminar paper in a related 
area of their choice. PR6R6QUISIT6: NS 3902. 

NS 4950 Seminar on Arms Control and National 
Security (4-0). 

An analysis of international negotiation processes 
as related to t he control of armaments, including a 
review of the history of modern arms control efforts, 
examination of the domestic political context of 
arms limitation, the implications of international 
law relevant to treaty negotiations, ratification and 
enforcement, the intellectual contributions of scien- 
tists to the development of arms control theory, 
and a review of selected substantive issues with 
respect to security concerns, verification capabili- 
ties and compliance measures. PR6R6QUISIT6S: NS 
3450 and 3900 or consent of the Instructor and 
S6CR6T clearance. 



171 



OCeflNOGRflPHV 



D€PflRTM€NT OF OC€fiNOGRfiPHV 



Chairman: 

Christopher N. K. Mooers, Professor, 
Code 68Mr, Root Hall, Room 304, 
(408) 646-2673, RV 878-2673. 
Associate Chairman: 

Research: 

Cduuord 6. Thornton, Professor, 

Code 68Tm, Spanagel Hall, Room 327, 

(408) 646-2847, RV 878-2847. 

Instruction: 

Joseph J. von Schwind 
Code 68Vs, Bldg. 224, 
(408) 646-3271, RV 878-3271. 

The Oceanography Department, like the 
Meteorology Department, primarily supports 
curricula sponsored by the Oceanographer of 
the Navy,- viz. 

#373 Rir-Ocean Science, #374 Operational 
Oceanography, #440 Oceanography, 
#441 Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy. 

The department also provides core courses 
for Naval Intelligence, RSUU, and the Space 
Curricula, but in accordance with naval pri- 
orities, the department focuses on Physical 
Oceanography and Mapping, Charting and 
Geodesy (MC&G). In the Physical Ocean- 
ography arena, topics include ocean dynam- 
ics, numerical ocean circulation modeling, sat- 
ellite remote sensing of the ocean, air-sea 
interaction, Rrctic oceanography, upper 
ocean dynamics and thermodynamics, near- 
shore processes, mesoscale dynamics, syn- 
optic/mesoscale ocean prediction, coastal 
ocean circulation, ocean optics and acoustics, 
and environmental acoustics. The MC&G 
arena includes hydrographic surveying, elec- 
tronic navigation, marine geodesy, photo- 
grammetry, marine geophysics (bathymetry, 
gravity, magnetics), naval astronomy and 
precision time, and digital cartography. For 
more programmatic details, see the descrip- 
tion of the Department of Meteorology. 

The Mapping, Charting and Geodesy Cur- 
riculum has International Hydrographic Orga- 
nization-International Federation of Surveyor 
Category R certification. 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN OCCRNOGRRPHV 

Entrance to a program leading to the de- 
gree Master of Science in Oceanography 
requires a baccalaureate degree. Minimal 
requirements include mathematics through 
differential and integral calculus, one year of 
college physics, and one year of college 
chemistry. Previous experience at sea is con- 
sidered advantageous. 

The degree of Master of Science in Ocean- 
ography requires: 

a. Completion of thirty-five quarter hours 
of graduate courses, of which fifteen hours 
must be in the 4000 oceanography series. 
The entire sequence of courses selected must 
be approved by the Department of Ocean- 
ography. Significant educational experience 
at sea on a research vessel is required for the 
degree. 

b. Completion of an acceptable thesis on a 
topic approved by the Department of Ocean- 
ography. 



MAST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN HYDROGRAPHIC SCI€NC€S 

entrance to a program leading to the de- 
gree Master of Science in Hydrographic Sci- 
ences requires a baccalaureate degree. Min- 
imal requirements include mathematics 
through differential and integral calculus, one 
year of college physics, and one year of col- 
lege chemistry. Previous experience at sea is 
considered advantageous. 

The degree of Master of Science in Hydro- 
graphic Sciences requires: 

a. Completion of forty quarter hours of 
graduate courses in the MC&G series of 
which twelve hours must be at the 4000 level. 
The entire sequence of courses must be ap- 
proved by the Department of Oceanography. 
Significant educational experience at sea on 
a research vessel is required for the degree. 

b. Completion of on acceptable thesis on a 
topic approved by the Deportment of Ocean- 
ography. 



172 



OC€RNOGRfiPHV 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ IN 

M€T€OROLOGV RND 
OCCRNOGRRPHY 

Direct entrance to a program leading to the 
degree Master of Science in Meteorology 
Oceanography requires a baccalaureate de- 
gree preferably in one of the physical sci- 
ences, mathematics, or engineering. This nor- 
mally permits the validation of a number of 
required undergraduate courses such as 
physics, chemistry, differential equations, 
linear algebra, vector analysis and various 
courses in meteorology and/or oceanogra- 
phy, which are prerequisites to the graduate 
program. These prerequisites may be taken 
at the Naval Postgraduate School; however, 
in that event the program may be lengthened 
by one or more quarters. 

The degree of Master of Science in Met- 
eorology and Oceanography requires: 

a. Completion of forty-eight quarter hours 
in meteorology and oceanography, to include 
at least tiuenty hours in the 4000 series, with 
a minimum of one 4000 level course in other 
than directed study. 

b. The basic sequence of graduate courses 
in the fields of dynamical, physical and syn- 
optic meteorology/oceanography must be 
included in the forty-eight hours. 

c. fl significant and educational experience 
at sea on a research vessel. 

d. Completion of an acceptable thesis on 
a topic approved by either department. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Department of Oceanography admission 
requirements for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy include: 

a. fl Master's degree (or the equivalent) in 
one of the physical sciences, mathematics, or 
engineering or 

b. fl Bachelor's degree with a high QPR or 

c. a highly successful first graduate year 
in a Master's program, with clear evidence of 
research ability. 

The Ph.D. Program is in Physical Oceanog- 
raphy, including areas of study in ocean circu- 
lation theory, ocean prediction, and ocean 
acoustics, among others. 

to undertake doctoral work in Oceanogra- 
phy, a student must apply to the Chairman, 
Department of Oceanography, fl copy of the 
Oceanography Ph.D. Program Guidelines is 
available from the Department of Oceanog- 
raphy, which should be followed. 



173 



OCCRNOGRRPHIC IRBORRTORICS 

NPS is an Associate Member of UNOLS 
(University National Oceanography Labora- 
tory System) and a full member of CCNCflL 
(Central California Cooperative). UNOLS oper- 
ates the Nation's academic oceanographic 
research fleet, while C6NCAL promotes and 
coordinates research vessel operations be- 
tween several academic institutions in Cen- 
tral California. The nearby Moss Landing Ma- 
rine Laboratory operates the NSF-owned 
1 35-foot R/V POINT SUR for the benefit of 
C6NCRL, with NPS a major user. NPS is also a 
member of UCflR (University Corporation for 
Atmospheric Research), which serves some of 
the computational and other research facility 
needs of the oceanographic community, too. 
Together with the Meteorology Department, 
the Oceanography Department operates the 
Interactive Digital Image Analysis Laboratory 
(IDIAL), that is equipped with several work- 
stations for the analysis of satellite images 
or other digital fields; e.g., numerical model 
output. The Department also operates a 1 6- 
terminal color graphics instructional labora- 
tory for simulation and analysis of ocean- 
ographic data. 

D€PRRTM€NTRL COURS€ 
OFF€RINGS 

OCCRNOGRRPHIC SCI€NC€S 

OC 011 0, 01 11 , 011 2, Oil 3 Application Seminars 

(1-0). 

Presentation of DOD related research activities, 
applications to uueapons and uuarfare systems, 
utilization of oceanography and meteorology in 
specific billets, presentations by faculty, staff, 
selected students, visiting authorities. OC 01 10 is 
for orientation: OC 01 1 1 is for intermediate stu- 
dents; OC 0112/0113 is for thesis orientation/ 
topic selection. PRCRCQUISITC: enrollment in an flir- 
Ocean Sciences curriculum. 
OC 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 
Cvery student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

OC 0999 Seminar in Oceanography (2-0). 
Students in the various oceanography curricula pre- 
sent their theses for discussion. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
Preparation of a thesis. 

Upper Division Courses 
OC 2001 Ocean Systems (4-0). 
This course is designed to support the Naval Intel- 
ligence Curriculum by providing on overview of sig- 
nificant oceanographic factors, data networks and 
their products, sound propagation in the ocean, 
active and passive sonar, and ocean vehicle design 
practices. 



OCEANOGRAPHY 



OC 2020 Computer Computations in Rir-Ocean 
Sciences (1-2). 

Introduction to FORTRAN, and the NPS mainframe 
computer, as applied to elementary problems in 
oceanography and meteorology. PRC-RC-QUISIT6S: 
Calculus and college physics. 

OC 2120 Survey of Oceanography (4-0) 
An integrated view of the whole field of ocean- 
ography including physical, biological, geological 
and other chemical aspects. PR6R6QUISITCS: None. 

OC 2520 Survey of Air-Ocean Remote Sensing 

(3-0). 

Overview of systems of remote sensing of the 
atmosphere and oceans from space, and opera- 
tional applications. PRC-RCQUISITICS: Undergrad- 
uate physics and calculus, or consent of Instructor. 

Upper Division of Graduate Courses 
OC 3120 Biogeochemicol Processes in the Ocean 

(4-3). 

Basic biological, geological, and chemical pro- 
cesses in the ocean. Biocoustics, deep scattering 
layers, and bio-deterioration. Geomorphic features 
of the ocean floor; kinds and distribution of ocean 
bottom features. Chemical composition of the 
ocean. 

OC 3130 Mechanics of Fluids (4-2). 
Fundamentals of the mechanics of fluids as a basis 
for geophysical fluid dynamics; introduction to field 
concepts, conservation principles, forces and ef- 
fects, stress and rate of strain, momentum, energy, 
irrotational flow; introduction to turbulence and 
boundry-layer flow. Cmphasis on problem solving. 
PR6R6QUISTIT6: MA 21 21 equivalent (may be con- 
current). 

OC 3140 Probability and Statistics for Rir-Ocean Sci- 
ence (3-2). 

Basic probability and statistics, in the air-ocean 
science context. Techniques of statistical data anal- 
ysis. Structure of a probability model, ensity, distri- 
bution function, expectation, and variance. Bino- 
mial, Poisson and Gaussian distributions. Condi- 
tional probability and independence. Joint distribu- 
tions, covariance and central limit theorem. Trans- 
formations of random variables. Histograms and 
empirical distributions and associated characteris- 
tics such as moments and percentiles. Standard 
tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals for 
both one-and two-parameter situations. Regres- 
sion analysis as related to least squares estima- 
tion. PR6R6QUISIT6: Calculus. 

OC 31 50 Analysis of Air Ocean Time Series (3-2). 
Analysis methods for atmospheric and oceanic time 
series. Correlation, spectrum, and empirical ortho- 
gonal function analyses. Statistical objective anal- 
ysus. Optimal design of air-ocean data networks. 
PR6RC-QUISIT6S: MA 2121 and a probability and 
statistics course. 



OC 3212 Polar Meteorology/Oceonogrophopy 

(4-0). 

Operational aspects of Arctic and Antartic meteo- 
rology. Polar oceanography. Sea ice: amount, its 
seasonal distribution, melting and freezing pro- 
cesses, physical and mechanical properties, drift, 
and predictions. Aspects of geology and geo- 
physics. PR6R6QUISIT6S: MR 3222, OC 3240, or 
consent of Instructor. 



OC 3230 Oceanic Thermodynamics (3-0). 
Physical properties of seawater. Processes in- 
fluencing the distribution of heat, salt and density 
in the ocean. Static and dynamic stability in the 
ocean. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: Calculus (may be concur- 
rent) and college physics. 

OC 3240 Ocean Circulation Analysis (4-2). 
Static and dynamic stability in the ocean. Currents 
without friction: application of geostrophy, thermal 
wind. UJind-driven and frictional currents: Reynolds 
equations; C-kman solution; Sverdrup transport; 
Potential vorticity: westward intensification and 
topographic steering. Computational and computer 
graphics analysis laboratory. PR6RCQUISIT6S: 
OC 3230, OC 3321. 

OC 3260 Sound in the Ocean (3-0). 
Designed for students in the Mapping, Charting, 
and Geodesy curriculum. A brief introduction to the 
physics of underwater acoustics followed by a de- 
tailed discussion of oceanographic factors affect- 
ing sound transmission in the ocean including ab- 
sorption, reflection, refraction, scattering, and 
ambient noise. C-mphasis placed on acoustic depth 
sounding, seafloor mapping, etc., for the hydro- 
graphic scientist. PR6R6QUISIT6: OC 3230. 



OC 3261 Oceanic Factors in Underwater Sound 

(4-0). 

Examines the oceanic factors which influence sound 
propagation in the ocean and the effects in acous- 
tic forecasting. Factors considered include temporal 
and spatial variations in sound speed profiles, 
ambient noise, biological effects, reflection charac- 
teristics of ocean surface and bottom, signal fluctu- 
ations, and forecasting ocean thermal structure, 
transmission loss, and ambient noise. This course is 
designed for the engineering Acoustics Curriculum. 
PRC-RC-QUISIT€: PH 3452. 

OC 3321 Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics (4-0). 
The hydrodynamical equations for a rotating strati- 
fied fluid. Forces, kinematics, boundary conditions, 
scale analysis. Simple balanced flows, baroclinicity, 
thermal wind, vorticity and divergence; rotational 
and divergent part of the wind; circulation theorem. 
Vorticity and potential vorticity. PRC-RCQUISIT6: 
MA 2047 (may be concurrent or equivalent). 



174 



OCeflNOGRflPHV 



OC 3325 Marine Geophysics (3-0). 

Theory and methods of marine geophysics surveys, 
and emphasis on gravity, magnetism, seismic and 
acoustic wave propagation, heat flow, and radio- 
activity; geophysical anomalies associated with 
major seafloor features; acoustic reflectivity of the 
seafloor; marine geodesy. PRCRC-QUISITC-: MA 21 21 
(may be concurrent). 

OC 3440 Small Oceanic Processes (2-2). 
Introduction to concepts and information about 
turbulence in the ocean. A survey of measurement 
techniques and available data is used to study 
small scale mixing processes and their relationship 
to internal waves, double diffusion, turbulence 
generation, and energy dissipitation. The role of 
turbulence in the dynamics and energetics of the 
ocean. PR6R6QUISITC-: OC 3230. 

OC 3445 Oceanic and Atmospheric Observational 
Systems (2-2). 

Principles of measurement; sensors, data acquisi- 
tion systems, calibration, etc. Methods of measure- 
ment for thermodynamic and dynamic variables in 
the ocean and atmosphere, including acoustics and 
optics. PRCRC-QUISITC-S: OC 3230 and MR 3420. 

OC 3520 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and 
Ocean (4-0). 

Principles of radiative transfer and satellite sensors 
and systems; visual, infrared and microwave radi- 
ometry, and radar systems; application of satellite 
remotely-sensed data in the measurement of at- 
mospheric and oceanic variability. PRCRCQUISITC: 
undergraduate physics and differential integral 
calculus; ordinary differential equations or consent 
of Instructor. 

OC 3522 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and 
Ocean with the Laboratory (4-2). 
Same as OC 3520 plus laboratory sessions on the 
concepts considered in the lecture series. PRCRCQ- 
UISIT6: Same as OC 3520. 

OC/MR 3570 Operational Oceanography and 
Meteorology (2-4). 

experience at sea in conducting oceanographic, 
meteorological, acoustical, and other observations 
and analyses. Integration of satellite remote sens- 
ing information with in situ data and on scene pre- 
diction. Includes pre-cruise planning, real-time 
operational product interpretation, and post-cruise 
analysis. PRCR6QUISIT6S: MR 3222, MR/OC 3522; 
concurrent MR 441 6, OC 4267, OC 4331. 

OC 3610 Wove and Surf Forecasting (2-2). 
Theory and prediction of wind-generated ocean 
waves. Spectral transformation of waves from 
deep to shallow water. Prediction of surf and wave 
related influences on operations. PR6R6QUISITCS: 
OC 3150, OC 4211. 



Graduate Courses 

OC 421 1 Dynamic Oceanography (4-0). 
Linear theory of surface and internal waves; theory 
of finite amplitude waves. PR6RCQUISITCS: MR 
3132, OC3240. 



OC 4212 Tides (4-0). 

Development of the theory of tides including the 
tide-producing forces, equilibrium tides, and the 
dynamic theory of tides; harmonic analysis and pre- 
diction of tides; tidal datum planes and their re- 
lationship with geodetic datum planes, short-term 
and secular changes in sea level. PR6R6QUISITCS: 
OC 3130 or OC 4211, 



OC 4213 Nearshore and Wave Processes (3-1). 
Shoal-water wave processes, breakers and surf; 
nearshore water circulation; beach characteristics; 
littoral drift; coastal hydraulics; storn surge. PF\€- 
R6QUISIT6: OC 421 1 or consent of Instructor. 



OC 4220 Shallow Water Oceanography (3-0). 
Circulation and exchange processes of continental 
shelf and slope regions, shallow seas, and straits. 
Dynamics and models of coastal ocean circulations 
driven by wind, thermohaline, tidal, boundary cur- 
rent, and ocean eddy forces. PR6R6QUISIT6S: OC 
421 1, OC/MR 3321, and OC/MR 4413. 



OC 4250 General Circulation of the Atmosphere 
and Oceans (3-0). 

Selected topics on the general circulation of the 
atmosphere (e.g., heat momentum and moisture 
fluxes; energetics) and ocean (e.g., linear and non- 
linear theories of the wind-driven ocean circulation, 
nonlinear thermocline theories, mesoscale eddies, 
mixed-layer theories); coupled ocean-atmosphere 
general circulation models. PRCR6QUISIT6: Consent 
of Instructor. 



OC 4267 Ocean Influences and Prediction: Under- 
water Acoustics (4-3). 

examines sound speed profiles (time and space 
variability), ambient noise, absorption, and reflec- 
tion from the sea surface and bottom as they affect 
sound propagation in the ocean. Synoptic predic- 
tion techniques for ambient noise and transmission 
loss are reviewed, environmental data input and 
computational approximations for acoustic models 
are evaluated against observed signal fluctuations 
and transmission loss. The course is designed for 
the flir-Ocean Science, Operational Oceanogra- 
phy, and nSLU Curricula. PRCR6QUISIT6S: OC 2120, 
PH 2471, concurrent enrollment in PH 3472 or OC 
3240 ond PH 3431 . SCCRCT clearance. 



175 



OCEANOGRAPHY 



OC 4323 Numcricol fiir and Occon Modeling (4-2). 
Numerical models of atmospheric and oceanic phe- 
nomena. Finite difference techniques for solving 
elliptic and hyperbolic equations, linear and non- 
linear computational instability. Spectral and finite 
element models. Filtered and primitive equation 
equation prediction models. Sigma coordinates. 
Objective analysis and initialization. Moisture and 
heating as time permits. PRCR6QUISIT6S: MR 4322, 
MR 3132, and MR 3232 desirable. 

OC 4331 Synoptic/Mesoscale Oceanography 

(4-0). 

Contemporary knouuledge of synoptic/mesoscale 
ocean variability. Kinematics, dynamics, and ener- 
getics of cyclonic and anticyclonic ocean eddies, 
ocean fronts, and meandering currents; their geo- 
graphical and statistical distribution. Methods of 
observation and practical application. PRCR6QUI- 
SITC-S: OC 3240, OC/MR 3321, OC/MR 31 50 (may 
be concurrent). 

OC 4335 elements of Ocean Prediction (3-2). 
Rnalyze, forecast, and interpret synoptic informa- 
tion on mesoscale, synoptic scale, and large 
scale processes on a regional basis. Use is made of 
dynamical and statistical principles and methods 
and of diagnostic and prognostic models. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6S: OC 4330, and OC/MR 4323 (may be con- 
current). 

OC 4413 Air/Sea Interaction (4-0). 
Fundamental concepts in turbulence. The atmo- 
spheric planetary boundary layer, including surface 
layer, and bulk formulae for estimating air-sea 
fluxes. The oceanic planetary boundary layer in- 
cluding the dynamics of the uuell-mixed surface 
layer. Recent papers on large-scale air-sea interac- 
tion. PR6R6QUISIT6: OC 3240 or MR 4322 (may be 
concurrent) or consent of Instructor. 

OC 4414 Advanced Air/Sea Interaction (3-0). 
Advanced topics in the dynamics of the atmospher- 
ic and oceanic planetary boundary layers. PRCRCQ- 
UISITC: OCF/MR 441 3 or consent of instructor. 

OC 4330 Operational Oceanography of US/USSR 
Acoustical Surveillance Systems (3-1). 
Advanced topics in the application of oceano- 
graphic and acoustic principles to specific opera- 
tional US/USSR surveillance systems. Ocean acous- 
tic limits on figure of merit, signal to noise ratio, per- 
formance index, median detection range, reliable 
acoustic path range, probability of detection, con- 
vergence zone and ducting are established in dif- 
ferent oceanic regimes and operational scenarios. 
Advanced ocean acoustic modeling (FRCT, P€, 
ASTRAL, AND DAN6S models) is introduced to com- 
pare the ocean acoustic effects on systems and to 
illustrate model limitations in establishing pre- 
dicted operational performance. Cmphasis on clas- 
sified student projects and use of visiting undersea 
surveillance authorities. PR6R6QUISITCS: USN offi- 
cers only, consent of Instructor. 



OC 4520 Topics in Satellite Remote Sensing (3-0). 
Selected topics in the advanced application of sat- 
ellite remote sensing to the measurement of atmo- 
spheric and oceanic variables. PR6R6QUISITC: 
OC/MR 3522. 

OC 4610 Soviet Oceanography (1-2). 
Soviet civilian and naval oceanography and met- 
eorology. The oceanography of soviet waters. In- 
cludes lectures, library research, and a term paper. 
S6CRCT clearance required. PRCR6QUISITCS: OC 
3240 and MR 3220 or equivalent. 

OC 4800 Advanced Topics in Oceanography (1-0 
to 4-0). 

Advanced topics in various aspects of oceanog- 
raphy. Topics not covered in regularly offered 
courses. The course may be repeated for credit as 
topics change. PR6R6QUISITC: Consent of the De- 
partment Chairman and Instructor. 

OC 4900 Special Topics in Oceanography ( 1 -0 to 
4-0). 

Independent study of advanced topics in oceanog- 
raphy not regularly offered. PR6RCQUISIT6: Consent 
of the Department Chairman and Instructor. 



MAPPING, CHARTING, AND G€OD€SV 

lower Division Courses 

GH 1101 Nautical Science for Hydrographers 

(2-0). 

Basic principles of nautical science for hydrogra- 
phers with little or no previous sea experience. Top- 
ics include piloting and navigation, celestial navi- 
gation, rules of the road, use of radar, radar plot- 
ting, small boat handling, ship capabilities, sea- 
manship, emergency procedures, safety at sea, 
marine communications, and magnetic and gyro 
compasses. 



Upper Division of Graduate Courses 

GH 3901 Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy (4-2). 
Principles and fundamentals of geodesy, photo- 
grammetry, and cartography. The application of 
these disciplines to mopping and charting with 
emphasis on the propagation of random errors in- 
herent in each phase: data acquisition, data reduc- 
tion, generalization, and portrayal. 

GH 3902 Hydrographic and Geodetic Surveying 

(4-2). 

Principles and applications of hydrographic and 
geodetic surveying. Introduction to surveying pro- 
cedures, both at sea and on land, including use of 
surveying instruments. PR6R6QUISITC: GH 3901. 



176 



OC€fiNOGRflPHV 



GH 3903 electronic Surveying and Navigation 

(4-0). 

Introduction to the theory and practice of electronic 
surveying and navigation including principles of 
electronics, electronic surveying systems and basic 
components, geometry of electronic surveying, ray 
path curvature, propagation velocity, and velocity 
applications to surveying. PRCRCQUISIT6: GH 3902. 

GH 3906 Hydrographic Survey Planning (2-2). 
Planning and management of a hydrographic sur- 
vey project. Gathering of sufficient background 
data (geodetic control, historic tide station loca- 
tions, etc.) and its implementation in planning a 
complete basic hydrographic survey of Monterey 
Bay. PR€R€QUISIT€: GH 3902. 

GH 3910 Hudrographic Surveying Field experience 

(2-9). 

Conduct a basic hydrographic survey of a portion of 
Monterey Bay. Field work consists of locating hori- 
zontal control stations through photogrammetric 
methods, installing and monitoring a tide gage, 
and running sounding lines using various types of 
positioning control. Data acquisition, reduction, 
and presentation will be emphasized. PRCR6QUI- 
SIT6S: GH 3906 and concurrent registration in GH 
3911. 

GH 391 1 Geodetic Surveying Field experience 

(1-5). 

Conduct a geodetic survey project in the Monterey 
Bay area to support GH 391 0. Methods include tri- 
angulation, trilateration, traverse, resection, and 
intersection. Azimuth determination by observation 
on Polaris. PR6R6QUISITCS: GH 3906 and concur- 
rent registration in GH 391 0. 

GH 3912 Advanced Hydrography (2-2). 
Contemporary aspects of hydrographic methods. 
Subjects include tidal current measurements, satel- 
lite navigation, inertial navigation, sidescan sonar, 
photobathymetry, laser bathymetry, and automa- 
tion in hydrography. Laboratory exercise includes 
planning a hydrographic survey project. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6S: GH 3903, GH 391 0, and GH 391 1 ; or con- 
sent of the Instructor. 

GH 3914 Adjustment Computations (2-2). 
Solution and analysis of geodetic networks and 
photogrammetric problems using least squares 
with matrices. Variance and covariance. LUeights. 
Condition and observation equations and combina- 
tions. Statistical tests. PR6RCQUISIT6: Mfl 2047. 



GH 3950 Naval Astronomy ond Precise Time (2-0). 
Positional astronomy. Coordinate systems. Solar 
system dynamics. Rstrometry (measurements of 
positions and motions of stars). Time, earth 
roation, and atomic clocks. Naval applications of 
astronomy. Overview of astrophysics and cosmol- 
ogy. PRCR6QUISIT6: College physics and calculus. 



Graduate Courses 

GH 4800 Advanced Topics in Geodetic Science 

(1-0) to (4-0). 

Advanced topics in various aspects of the geodetic 
science. Topics not covered in regularly offered 
courses. The course may be repeated for credit as 
topics change. PRCR6QUISIT6S: Consent of the De- 
partment Chairman and Instructor. 

GH 4906 Geometric and Astronomic Geodesy 

(4-0). 

Properties of the ellipsoid, geometric aspects of 
geodesy including triangulation, trilateration, 
traverse, and leveling techniques and instrumen- 
tation,- adjustment by least squares, astronomic 
determination of latitude, longitude, and azimuth; 
time and astronomic instrumentation. PRC-RC-QUI- 
SITCS: OC 3325 and GH 3902. 

GH 4907 Gravimetric and Satellite Geodesy (4-0). 
Potential theory as applied to the gravity field of 
the earth; application of Stokes' Formula, integral, 
and function; deflection of the vertical; gravimetric 
reduction; geometric and dynamic applications of 
satellites, orbital geometry ond satellite orbit dy- 
namics. PRC-R6QUISITC-: GH 4906. 

GH 4908 Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 

(3-2). 

Application of photogrammetric instruments and 
techniques to planimetric, topographic, ond hydro- 
graphic data compilation. Use of analog, semi- 
analytical, and analytical photogrammetry in geo- 
detic control extension. Planning ond execution of 
aerial photography. Principles and fundamentals of 
remote sensing. Application of remote sensing 
imagery to mapping and charting. PR6RCQUISIT6: 
GH 3902. 



177 



OPCfiflTIONS R6S6HRCH 



D€PRRTM€NT OF 
OPERATIONS R€S€fiRCH 



Chairman: 

Peter Purdue, Professor, 

Code 55, Root Hall, Room 272, 

(408) 646-2381, flV 878-2381. 

Associate Chairmen: 

Operations: 

fllvin F. flndrus, Assoc. Professor, 
Code 55As, Root Hall, Room 265. 
(408) 646-2413, FlV 878-2413. 

Research: 

Donald R. Barr, Professor, 

Code 558n, Root Hall, Room 263, 

(408) 646-2663, AV 878-2663. 

Instruction: 

James D. Csaru, Professor, 
Code 55€u, Root Hall, Room 273. 
(408) 646-2780, flV 878-2780 
The Operations Research Department was 
founded in 1 961 , primarily to service students 
in the rapidly expanding Ofl (360) Curriculum. 
Graduates of that Curriculum receive the Mas- 
ter of Science in Operations Research de- 
gree, as will graduates of the recently in- 
augurated Operational Logistics (361) Cur- 
riculum. The Department consists of approx- 
imately forty faculty located in Root Hall. The 
primary laboratory is the Man/Machine Sys- 
tems Design Lab on the first floor of Root Hall, 
but the Department also has an interest in 
the UUargaming Lab in Ingersoll Hall and the 
Microcomputer Lab in Ro-262. 

In addition to being the primary Depart- 
ment for the 360 and 361 curricula, the Op- 
erations Research Department also provides 
an extensive sequence of service courses for 
students in other curricula, and is charged 
with teaching all probability and statistics 
courses at NPS. Nearly half of the Depart- 
ment's teaching effort is devoted to these 
courses. 

Active research areas within the Depart- 
ment include statistics, stochastic processes, 
mathematical programming, human factors, 
wargaming, simulation, combat models, lo- 
gistic systems and the study of Soviet military 
operations research. 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN fiPPUCD SCI€NC€ 

Students with acceptable academic back- 
grounds may enter a program leading to the 
degree in Applied Science with a major in 
Operations Research. The program of each 
student seeking this degree must contain a 
minimum of 20 quarter hours in operations re- 
search at the graduate level, including work 
at the 4000 level. Additionally, the program 
must contain a minimum of 12 graduate 
quarter hours in an approved sequence of 
courses outside the Department of Opera- 
tions Research. A total minimum of 1 2 quarter 
hours at the 4000 level plus an acceptable 
thesis is required. This program provides 
depth and diversity through specially ar- 
ranged course sequences to meet the needs 
of the Navy and the interests of the individu- 
al. The Department Chairman's approval is re- 
quired for all programs leading to this de- 
gree. Applications to include this degree in 
dual Master's programs will not be approved. 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ 
IN OKRRTIONS R€S€RRCH 

A candidate shall previously have satis- 
fied the requirements for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in Operations Research or the 
equivalent. 

Completion of a minimum of 40 quarters 
hours of graduate level courses with: 

a. At least 1 8 quarter hours of 4000 level 
operations research/systems analysis 
courses. 

b. An elective sequence approved by the 
Department of Operations Research. 

c. At least two but not more than three 
quarter courses devoted for a thesis. 

Submission of an acceptable thesis on a 
subject previously approved by the Depart- 
ment of Operations Research. This credit shall 
not count toward the requirement as stated 
in (a) above. 



178 



OP6RFITIONS R€S€FiRCH 



In addition to the school wide requirement 
of o 3.00 quality point rating for graduate 
level courses, the candidate must achieve a 
minimum of 2.75 quality point rating in all 
core courses. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
The Department offers the Ph.D. degree in 
Operations Research. The program begins 
with advanced coursework guided by the stu- 
dent's doctoral committee and leading to 
qualifying examinations in mathematical pro- 
gramming, statistics and stochastic proces- 
ses, as well as completion of a minor field of 
study outside of Operations Research. The 
primary emphasis then shifts to the student's 
research program culminating in the Ph.D. dis- 
sertation. 

Students wishing to enter directly into the 
doctoral program should write to the Depart- 
ment Chairman. Rpplicants should include 
transcripts, Graduate Record examination (or 
equivalent) scores, and a brief statement of 
purpose. Detailed admission procedures may 
vary depending on the individual's location 
and position. However, in all cases the stu- 
dent must fulfill the general school require- 
ments for the Doctor's degree. Residency for 
this program generally requires 2-3 years be- 
yond completion of a Master's Degree. 

D€PflRTM€NTAl 
COURS6 OFKRINGS 

On 0001 Seminar for Operations Analysis Students 

(0-2). 

Guest lecturers. Review of experience tours. Thesis 

and research presentations. 

OR 0810 Thesis Research for Operations Analysis 
students (0-0) 

Cvery student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

Upper Division Courses 

OA 2200 Computational Methods for Operations 
Research (3-2) 

Introduction to computer usage with emphasis on 
computational methods particularly appropriate 
for operations research. Planning and structuring 
computer programs. Programming in FORTRRN. Use 
of text editor, dish files.subroutine libraries, and de- 
bugging aids in timesharing mode on mainframe 
computers. Cxtensive project work coordinates 
growing student FORTRRN knowledge with topics 
in OR computing. Project topics may include numeri- 
cal error analysis, probability distributions, random 
sampling, matrix computations, search methods 
and OR modeling. RPL programming will be intro- 
duced as a final topic. PR6R6QUISIT6S: None. 



OA 2600 Introduction to Operations Analysis (4-0) 
R first course in Operations Rnalysis, covering its 
origins in UJorld UJar II to current practice. Intro- 
duces concepts, tools and methods of analysis, 
with tactical examples. Emphasis is on measuring 
combat effectiveness and developing better tac- 
tics. PRCRCQUISIT6: None. 

OA 291 Selected Topics in Operations Analysis 
(2-0 to 5-0) 

Presentation of a wide selection of topics from the 
current literature. This course may be repeated for 
credit if course content changes. PR6R6QUISIT6: R 
background in operations research. 

Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

OA 3101 Probability (4-1). 
Probability axioms and event probability. Random 
variables and their probability distributions. Mo- 
ment generating functions, moments and other dis- 
tribution characteristics, distribution families. Func- 
tions of a random variable, including the probability 
integral transformation. PR6RC-QUISITC-: MR 1 1 1 5 or 
equivalent. 

OA 3102 Probability and Statistics (4-1) 
Jointly distributed random variables, indepen- 
dence and conditional distributions, covariance 
ano correlation. Functions of several random vari- 
ables, sampling distributions, limiting distributions, 
the central limit theorem, approximations. Order 
statistics, the t and F distributions, the bivariate 
normal distribution. Point estimation, properties of 
estimators. PR6R6QUISIT6: OR 3101 and MR 1 1 16 
or equivalent; MR 31 10 taken concurrently. 

OA 3103 Statistics (4-1) 

Confidence intervals, Bayesian intervals, hypo- 
thesis testing, significance testing, regression, 
analysis of variance, nonparametric inference. Rp- 
plications to reliability, test and evaluation and 
operations research problems. PR€R€QUISIT€: OR 
3102 or equivalent. 

OA 3104 Data Analysis (3-1 ) 
Techniques of analyzing, summarizing, and compar- 
ing sets of real data. The exploratory nature of 
data analysis is featured through a variety of plot- 
ting methods and interactive work on computer 
terminals. Includes model building, and the dis- 
covery and overcoming of shortcomings in data col- 
lected in actual situations. PR6R6QUISIT6: OR 
3103. 

OA 3105 Nonparametic Statistics (4-0) 
Tests based on the binomial distribution; confi- 
dence intervals for percentiles, tolerance intervals 
and goodness-of-fit tests; contingency tables, one 
sample tests, two sample tests and tests for inde- 
pendence based on ranks and scores; nonpara- 
metric analysis of variance and regression. Applica- 
tions will illustrate the techniques. PR€RC-QUISIT€: R 
course in statistical inference. 



179 



OPERATIONS R6S6ARCH 



Ofl 3201 Lineor Programming (4-0) 
Theory of optimization of linear functions subject to 
linear constraints. The simplex algorithm, duality, 
dual simplex algorithm, sensitivity analyses, para- 
metric linear programming, transportation algor- 
ithm and matrix payoff games. Applications to re- 
source allocation, manpouuer planning, transporta- 
tion and communications network models, ship 
scheduling and elementary strategic games. Intro- 
duction to machine computing and MPS. PRC-R6Q— 
UISIT6: MA2042, MA 3110 taken concurrently, and 
FORTRAN or equivalent. 

OR 3301 Stochastic Models I (4-0) 
The homogeneous and inhomogeneous Poisson 
process, filtered and compound Poisson process. 
Stationary Markov chains and their applications in 
modeling random phenomena. PA6AC-QUISIT6: R 
calculus based probability course. 

Ofl 3302 OR System Simulation (4-0) 
Discrete event digital simulation methodology. 
Monte Carlo techniques, us of FORTRAN and other 
available simulation languages. Variance reduction 
techniques, design of simulation experiments and 
analysis of results. PR€R€QUISIT€S: Ofl 2200 or 
equivalent; Ofl 3103 or equivalent. 

On 33401-3402 Human Factors in Systems De- 
sign - III (4-0 and 3-0) 

The human element in man-machine systems. Se- 
lected topics in human engineering and psycho- 
physics with emphasis on their relation to military 
systems. Man-machine interface and man's motor 
and sensory capacities. PRC-R6QUISIT6: A course in 
statistics. 

On 3501 Inventory I (4-0) 

A study of deterministic and approximate stochas- 
tic inventory models. Determiniistic economic lot 
size models with infinite production rate, con- 
straints, quantity discounts. An approximate lot 
size-reorder point model with stochastic demand. 
An approximate stochastic periodic review model. 
Single period stochastic models. Applications to 
Navy supply systems. PR6R6QUISIT6: A calculus 
based probability course. 

On 3601 Combat Models and Games (4-1 ) 

This course provides a discussion of measures of ef- 
fectiveness and a quantitative introduction to dy- 
namic programming, target coverage models, Kal- 
man filters, Lanchester Systems, and two-person 
zero-sum games. PR6R6QUISITCS: MA 3110, or 
OA 3102. 

On 3602 Search Theory and Detection (4-0) 
Search and detection as stochastic processes. 
Characterization of detection devices, use and in- 
terpretation of sweep widths and lateral range 
curves, true range curves. Measures of effective- 
ness of search-detection systems. Allocation of 



search efforts, sequential search. Introduction to 
the statistical theory of signal detection. Models of 
surveillance fields, barriers, tracking and trailing. 
PSC-R6QUISITC: OA 3301, PH 3321. 

On 3900 Workshop in Operations Research/ 
Systems Analysis (2-0 to 5-0) 
This course may be repeated for credit if course 
content changes. PR6RC-QUISITC-: Departmental ap- 
proval. Graded on Pass/Fair basis only. 

On 391 Selected Topics in Operations Research/ 
Systems Analysis (2-0 to 5-0) 

Presentation of a wide selection of topics from the 
current literature. This course may be repeated for 
credit if course content changes. PRCR6QUISIT6: A 
background of advanced work in operations re- 
search. Consent of Instructor. 

Graduate Courses 
On 4101 Design of experiments (3-1) 
Theory and application of the general linear hy- 
pothesis model. Analysis of variance and analysis 
of covariance. Planning experiments, traditional 
and hybrid experimental designs. Use of standard 
computer package for analysis of experimentation 
data. PRCR6QUISITC: OR 3103 or equivalent. 

On 4102 Regression Analysis (4-0) 
Construction, analysis and testing of regression 
models. An in-depth study of regression and its ap- 
plication in operations research, economics and the 
social sciences. PR6RCQUISITC-: Ofl 31 02, Ofl 31 03, 
Ofl 31 04. 

On 4103 Advanced Probability (3-0) 
Probability spaces, random variables as measur- 
able functions, expectation using the Lebesque 
Stieltjes integral and abstract integration. Models 
of convergence, characteristic functions, the contin- 
uity theorem, central limit theorems, the zero-one 
law. Conditional expectation. PRC-RC-QUISIT6: MR 
3605 or departmental approval. 

On 4104 Advanced Statistics (3-0) 
Foundations of statistics from a decision-theoretic 
viewpoint. Robust estimation techniques, biased 
estimation. Fisher's and Kullback information, 
asymptotic methods. Sufficiency, completeness, 
the Cramer-Rao inequality. Sequential tests, empir- 
ical Bayes tests. Statistical computation methods. 
PR6RC-QUISITC-: OA 31 03 and consent of Instructor. 

OA 4201 Nonlinear Programming (4-0) 
Introduction to modern optimization techniques, 
Huhn-Tucker necessary and sufficient conditions for 
optimality, quadratic and separable programming, 
basic gradient search algorithms and penalty func- 
tion methods. Applications to weapons assign- 
ment, force structuring, parameter estimation for 
nonlinear or constrained regression, personnel as- 
signment and resource allocation. PA6R6QUISITC-: 
Ofl 3201, MA 3110. 



180 



OPERATIONS R6S6ARCH 



OR 4202 Network Flows and Graphs (4-0) 
Introduction to formulation and solution of prob- 
lems involving networks. Clements of graph theory, 
data structures, search algorithms, max-flow min- 
cut theorem, shortest route problems, minimum 
cost flows, and PCRT/CPM Applications to produc- 
tion and inventory, routing, scheduling, network in- 
terdiction, and personnel management. PRCRCQ- 
UISIT6: Ofl 3201. 

OR 4203 Mathematical Programming (4-0) 
Advanced topics in linear programming, large scale 
systems, the decomposition principle, additional 
algorithms, bounded variable techniques, linear 
fractional programming, probabilistic programming, 
formulation and solution procedures for problems 
in integer variables. Applications to capital budget- 
ing, large scale distribution systems, weapon sys- 
tems allocation and others. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 
3201. 

OR 4204 Games of Strategy (4-0) 
Mathematical models of conflict situations, empha- 
sizing the theory of decision making against a com- 
pletely opposed enemy. Topics include matrix 
games, Blotto games, stochastic games, and the 
Shapley value. Applications to combat, resource 
allocation, cost sharing, etc. PRCRCQUISITCS: knowl- 
edge of Linear Programming and a course in Prob- 
ability. 

OR 4205 Rdvanced Nonlinear Programming (4-0) 
Continuation of OA 4201 . Advanced topics in non- 
linear programming including duality theory, further 
consideration of necessary and sufficient condi- 
tions for optimality, additional computational 
methods and examination of recent literature in 
nonlinear programming. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 4201. 

OR 4206 Dynamic Programming and Optimal 
Control (4-0) 

The basic theory, including Bellman's equation and 
the Maximum Principle. Applications to tactical and 
economic problems. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 3201 

OR 4301 Stochastic Models II (3-2) 
Course objectives are to teach methods of stochas- 
tic modeling beyond those taught in OA 3301 and 
to give students an opportunity to apply these 
tools to real world problems. Suitably selected 
projects that entail data collection and analysis are 
undertaken, with emphasis on problem formula- 
tion, choice of appropriate assumptions and attain- 
ment of practical results. Topics include renewal 
processes and Kalman Filtering as illustrated by 
several military and industrial applications. PRC- 
RCQUISITC: OA 3301. 

OR 4302 Reliability and Weapons System effec- 
tiveness Measurement (4-0) 
Component and system reliability functions and 
other reliability descriptors of system effective, 
ness. Relationships between system and compo- 



nent reliability. Point and interval estimates of reli- 
ability parameters under various life testing plans. 
Illustrations of current methods of reliability 
assessment from appropriate MIL-STD's and manu- 
als. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 3301. 

OR 4303 Sample Inspection and Quality Rssurance 

(4-0) 

Attribute and variables sampling plans. MIL-STD 
sampling plans with modifications. Multi-level con- 
tinuous sampling plans and sequential sampling 
plans. Structure and implementation of quality as- 
surance programs and analysis of selected quality 
assurance problems. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 3103 or 
consent of instructor. 

OR 4304 Decision Theory (3-0) 
Basic concepts, Bayes, admissible, minimax, and re- 
gret strategies. Principles of choice. Relation of sta- 
tistical decision functions to the theory of games. 
Applications in the planning of operational evalua- 
tion trials. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 3103. 

OR 4305 Stochastic Models III (4-0) 
Lecture topics include, non-stationary behavior of 
Markov processes, point process models, regen- 
erative processes, Markovian queueing network 
models, and non-Markovian systems. Applications 
to include reliability, computer system modeling, 
combat modeling and manpower systems. Stu- 
dents are given exercises entailing data analysis, 
formulation of probability models, and application 
of models to answer specific questions concerning 
particular phenomenon. PRCRCQUISITCS: OA 3104, 
OA 3301, OA4301. 

OR 4306-4307 Stochastic Processes Ml (4-0) 
The Holmogorov theorem, analytic properties of 
sample functions; continuity and differentiability in 
quadratic mean; stochastic integrals, stationary 
processes. Stationary and non-stationary prob- 
lems; Martingale limit theorems and the invariance 
principle. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 4103. 

OR 4308 Time Series Analysis (4-0) 
Second order stationary processes. Harmonic anal- 
ysis of correlation functions. Filters and spectral 
windows. Crgodic properties. Problems of inference 
in time series analysis. Box-Jenkins techniques. In- 
troduction to the analysis of multivariate proces- 
ses. PRCRCQUISITC: OA 3301. OA 3104. 

OR 4321 Decision Support Systems (3-1 ) 
An introduction to the topic: includes an overview of 
organizational decision making, discussion of OR 
techniques integral to DSS, relationships to arti- 
ficial intelligence and expert systems, specialized 
computer languages, and non-traditional tech- 
niques for handling uncertainty. Current operation- 
al systems, both military and civilian, will be used 
as examples. PRCRCQUISITCS: A course in Computer 
Programming and a course in probability. 



181 



OP6RRTIONS R€S€RRCH 



OR 4333 Simulation Methodology (4-0) 
R greoter-depth coverage of material introduced in 
OR 3302 and OR 3601. Advanced techniques of 
model development and simulation experimenta- 
tion. Discussion of current research. Rctual topics 
selected will depend on interests of students and 
instructor. PR6RCQUISITC: OR 3302. 

OR 4401 Human Performance evaluation (4-0) 
experimental considerations, strategy, and tech- 
niques in evaluation of human performance charac- 
teristics and capabilities. Detailed examination of 
special methods to include multivariate designs, 
psychophysical methods, and psychophysiological 
methods. Review of important variables affecting 
human performance and criteria, measures of effec- 
tiveness, and figures of merit as indicants of per- 
formance quality. PR6RC-QUISITC: OR 3401. 

OR 4402 Skilled Operator Performance (3-2) 
First part of the course is devoted to an examina- 
tion of the theoretical foundations of skilled per- 
formance. The second half of the course is devoted 
to the study of the acquisition, development and 
prediction of skilled operator performance in the 
operational setting. PR6RC-QUISIT6: OR 3401. 

OR 4404 Operations Research in Man-Machine 
Systems (4-0) 

Rpplication of operations research techniques to 
man-machine design and evaluation problems. 
Quantitative methods for performance will be 
treated using such concepts as reliability, informa- 
tion theory, and signal detection theory. R portion 
of the course is devoted to summarizing approach- 
es to real world problems incorporating current 
methods from the literature. PRC-R6QUISIT6S: OR 
3401, OR 3201, OR 3301 and OR 4301 (may be 
taken concurrently). 

OR 4501 Seminar in Supply Systems (4-0) 
R survey of the supply system for the U.S. Navy. 
Topics include the inventory models at all levels for 
consumables and repairables, budget formulation 
and execution, provisioning and allowance lists, 
planned program requirements, transaction item 
reporting and current topics of research such as 
stock migration, and material distribution studies. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: OR 3501 

OR 4502 Inventory II (4-0) 
R study of stochastic inventory models. Single peri- 
od models with time dependent costs, constrained 
multiple item single period models, deterministic 
and stochastic dynamic inventory models, the peri- 
odic review model, theQ-1 continuous review mod- 
el. PR6R6QUISIT6S: OR 3301, OR 3501. 

OR 4602 Campaign Analysis (4-0) 
The development, use and state-of-the-art of mari- 
time campaign analysis. €mphasis is on formulating 
the analysis, measures of effectiveness, handling 



assumptions, and oarametric evaluations. Com- 
municating results in speech and writing is an im- 
portant part of the course. Students conducts a pro- 
ject as study team members. They research a nd re- 
port on major portions of major U.S. Navy analyses. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: OR 3103, OR 3302, OR 3601, OR 
3602, OR 4604, and 56CRCT NOFORN clearance. 

OR 4603 Test and evaluation (3-2) 
This course relates the theory and techniques of 
operations research to the problems associated 
with test and evaluation. Specific examples of exer- 
cise design, reconstruction, and analysis are ex- 
amined. PR6RC-QUISIT6S: OR 3104. 

OR 4604 War Gaming Rnalysis (4-0) 
Analysis of problems in the design, construction 
and application of manual computer and interac- 
tive gaming. Cmphasis is on gaming as a means of 
evaluating Naval Warfare tactics. NUJISS and 
NRVTRG gaming facilities will be used. PRC-R6Q- 
UISIT6S: OR 3302. SC-CR6T NOFORM clearance. 

OR 4605 Operations Research Problems in Naval 
Warfare (3-0) 

Rnalyses of fleet exercises. Changes in tactics and 
force disposition arising from the introduction of 
nuclear weapons and missiles. Relationship of air 
defense to strike capability and RSW. Current ra- 
dar, sonar, communications and 6CM problems. 
PRCR6QUISITC: OR 3601, OR 4604. 

OR 4606 Rpplications of Search, Detection and 
Localization Models to RSW (3-0) 
Rpplications of search, detection and localization 
models to search planning, target localization and 
tracking procedures, and RSW sensor evaluation. 
Both acoustic and nonacoustic RSW sensors are 
considered. PR6R6QUISITCS: OS 3601 or OR 4604, 
SCCR6T NOFORN clearance. 

OR 4607 Tactical Design and Rnalysis (4-0) 
Use of hand-held programmable calculators (HPCs) 
and their application to tactical problems in the op- 
erational environment. Characteristics of currently 
available HPCs will be discussed and compared 
with special emphasis on their use of their more so- 
phisticated features. Methods for implementing 
environmental, search, localization and tracking al- 
gorithms on the HPC. Individual and/or group proj- 
ects allow the student to apply the concepts pre- 
sented in class to problems in his area of expertise. 
PRCRCQUISIT6S: OR 3602 or OS 3601 or consent of 
instructor and SCCRCT NOFORN clearance. 

OR 4608 Soviet Military Operations Research 

(4-0) 

This course provides an introduction to Soviet mili- 
tary operations research, with an emphasis on 
asymmetries in Soviet and Rmerican use of military 
OR. It will focus on how OR influences Soviet mili- 
tary theory and practice. It will begin by examining 



182 



OP6RATIONS R€S€ARCH 



the Soviet military mind as influenced by the Rus- 
sian/Soviet historical experience, Marxist-Leninist 
ideology, and Soviet social and military instruc- 
tions. It mill then trace the historical development 
of military OR in the Soviet Union and discuss its 
nature today. Students will receive €nglish transla- 
tions of major Soviet works on military OR. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6S: Course on combat modeling (e.g. Ofl 3601 
or OR 4654) or consent of Instructor, and S6CRC-T 
NOFORN clearance. 

OA 4654 Airland Combat Models I (4-0) 
Introduction to modeling air/ground combat opera- 
tions with emphasis on detailed approaches for 
modeling small-scale combat. Topics include: types 
of models, the modeling process, verification, tar- 
get acquisition models, target selection, weapon 
accuracy, lethality models, terrain effects, tactical 
decision making, and integration of these models 
into large scale simulation models of combat. Mod- 
els currently in use in DOD analysis are used as ex- 
amples throughout the course. PR6RC-QUISITC: OR 
3301. 

OR 4655 Airland Combat Models II (4-0) 
Modeling of large scale air/ground combat opera- 
tions using aggregated force on force combat mod- 
els. Topics include: Aggregation and disaggrega- 
tion, types of models used for large scale opera- 
tions, firepower index and Lanchester equation ap- 
proaches to attrition modeling, movement rate of 
advance models, air warfare models, and air alloca- 
tion, logistics. C3 I process models, artificial intelli- 
gence applications. Models currently in use for 
DOD analysis are used as examples throughout 
the course. PR€R€QUISIT€: OR 3301 or consent of 
the Instructor. 

OA 4701 econometrics (4-0) 
Construction and testing of econometric models, 
analysis of economic time series, and the use of 
multivariate statistical analysis in the study of eco- 
nomic behavior. PR6R6QUISIT6: OR 3103. 
OA 4702 Cost estimation (4-0) 
Advanced study in the methods and practice of sys- 
tems analysis with emphasis on cost analysis, cost 
models and methods for total program structures 
and single projects; relationship of effectiveness 
models and measures to cost analysis; public capi- 
tal budgeting of interrelated projects; detailed ex- 
amples from current federal practices. PR6R6Q- 
UISITC: RS 361 1 or equivalent. 

OA 4703 Defense expenditure and Policy Analysis 

(4-0) 

fl presentation of the major components of de- 
fense budgeting and policy formulation from the 
standpoint of the three major institutions involved, 
the agency, executive and congress. The use of 
quantitative models of institutional behavior is em- 
phasized when examining both individual institu- 
tions and the interaction between them. PR6RC-Q- 
UISIT€:RS3611. 



OA 4704 OR Techniques in Manpower Modeling 
(44)) 

The most frequently applied manpower models are 
studied including Markov Chain and Renewal Mod- 
els using grade and/or length of service cate- 
gories. Statistical techniques to estimate relevant 
attrition and promotion rates from cohort and cen- 
sus data are also included in the course to provide 
both longitudinal and cross-sectional views of per- 
sonnel systems. Career aspects are analyzed with 
respect to attrition, promotion opportunity and 
time to promotion in hierarchical systems with or 
without promotion zones. C-xamples emphasize the 
personnel systems of the military services. PR6- 
R6QUISIT6S: OR 3201, OR 3301, OR 3103. 

OA 4910 Selected Topics in Operations Analysis 
(2-0 to 5-0) 

Presentation of a wide selection of topics from the 
current literature. This course may be repeated for 
credit if course content changes Pfl€R€QUISIT€: R 
background of advanced work in operations re- 
search and departmental approval. 

OA 4930 Readings in Operations Analysis (2-0 to 
5-0) 

This course may be repeated for credit if course 
content changes. PR6R6QUISIT6: Departmental ap- 
proval. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. 



Service Courses 

OS 0810 Thesis Research for C3 Students (0-0) 

Cvery student conducting thesis research will enroll 
in this course. 

Upper Division Courses 

OS 2101 Analysis of experimental Data (4-0) 
Introduction to statistical analysis of measure- 
ments and experimental data. Frequency distribu- 
tions, graphical representations. Populations and 
sampling. Principle of least squares, estimation of 
mean and standard deviation. Curve fitting and re- 
gression, propagation of errors. Confidence inter- 
vals, tests and contingency tables, elementary 
RNOVR. Relevant probabilistic concepts introduced 
as needed. 

OS 2102 Introduction to Applied Probability for 
electrical engineering (4-1 ) 

First course in probability. Structure of a probability 
model, density, distribution functions, expectation 
and variance. Some basic models, Binomial, Pois- 
son and Gaussian distributions. Conditional proba- 
bility and independence. Joint distributions, covar- 
iance and central limit theorom. Transformations of 
random variables. PR6R6QUISIT6: MR 1116 or 
equivalent. 



183 



OP6RATIONS R6S6ARCH 



OS 2103 Applied Probability for Systems 
technology (4-1 ) 

first course in probability for students in operation- 
al curricula. Topics include classical probability cal- 
culation, discrete and continuous random variables, 
basic probability distributions, introduction to 
modeling, expectation, variance, covariance and 
rudiments of discrete-time processes. Cmphasis is 
on developing familiarity with basic concepts and 
computational skills rather than mathematical rigor. 
Problem session is used in part to refresh and re- 
inforce necessary calculus topics. PR6R6QUISIT6: 
Mfl 1 1 1 6. 

OS 2210 Introduction to Computer Programming 

(4-1) 

fin introduction to the operation and programming 
of the mainframe computer and portable program- 
mable computers used in the fiSUJ Curriculum. The 
FORTRfiN and BASIC languages are emphasized. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

OS 3001 OR for Computer Scientists (4-0) 
fin introduction to some methodology and tech- 
niques of operations research that are relevant to 
computer system performance modeling and speci- 
fication. Topics include Poisson Processes, Relia- 
bility Theory and Queueing Theory. 

OS 3002 OR for Naval Intelligence (4-0) 
This course provides an introduction to the ap- 
proach and methods of operations research, with 
special emphasis on military applications of inter- 
est to intelligence. It focuses on the mathematical 
modeling of combat operations and considers in- 
telligence aspects (particularly Soviet use of OR. 
Students develop basic skills in such modeling. 
Topics include: operational definitions, measure- 
ment of combat effectiveness, model validation/ 
verification, and models versus modeling, filso in- 
cluded are modeling of processes of target acquisi- 
tion, fire assessment (kill probabilities and target 
coverage), tactical decision making, and games. 

OS 3003 OR for electronic Warfare (4-0) 
This course deals with applicatins of quantitative 
models to operational electronic warfare problems, 
with the underlying idea being to make decisions 
by optimizing some measure of effectiveness 
(MO€). Topics covered include €SM, 6CM/C-CCM, 
strike warfare, fiSMD, and cost-effectiveness trade- 
offs. PRCR6QUISIT6S: Calculus and OS 2103. 



OS 3004 OR for Computer Systems Managers 

(5-0) 

fi one-quarter survey of Operations Research tech- 
niques of particular interest to students in comput- 
er systems management. Model formulation, de- 
cision theory, linear programming, project manage- 
ment techniques, inventory models, queueing and 
simulation, reliability and maintainability. €x- 
amples will illustrate the application of these tech- 
niques to the management of computer systems. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: Mfi 2300, OS 3101. 

OS 3005 OR for Communications Managers (4-0) 
fi one-quarter survey of operations research tech- 
niques of particular interest to students in commu- 
nications management. Model formulation, de- 
cision theory, games, linear programming, network 
flows, CPM and P6RT, reliability and maintainability, 
Queueing theory, and systems simulation. PR6- 
R€QUISIT€S: Mfl 2300, OS 3101 or OS 3105. 

OS 3006 Operations Research for Management 

(4-0) 

fi survey of problem solving techniques for opera- 
tions research. Topics include decision theory, lin- 
ear programming, models, project scheduling, in- 
ventory, queueing and simulation. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 
Mfi 2300, OS 31 01 or OS 31 05. 

OS 3007 Operations Research Methodology (4-0) 
Survey of Operations Research techniques not cov- 
ered in OS 3006. Topics may include simulation, 
search theory, extensions of combat models, net- 
work flows, and Markov chains. PRC-RC-QUISIT6S: OS 
3106 and OS 3006 concurrently. 

OS 3008 Analytical Planning Methodology (4-0) 
A one-quarter survey of operations research tech- 
niques of particular interest to students in the C3 
curriculum, with emphasis on model information. 
Topics include linear and nonlinear programming, 
integer programming, networks, flow shop and 
project scheduling, decision analysis, queueing 
and simulation. PRC-R6QUISIT6: Mfi 2300. 

OS 31 01 Statistical Analysis for Management (4-1 ) 

A specialized course covering the basic methods of 
probability and statistics with emphasis on man- 
agerial applications. The course includes applica- 
tions of probability models, statistical inference 
and regression analysis. Computation for these 
applications are carried out on a computer, using 
commercial software packages. Topics in probabil- 
ity include the binomial, geometric, Poisson and 
normal distributions, risk, and expected value. Para- 
metric statistical techniques include significance 
testing and confidence intervals, together with 
point estimation of model parameters. Regression 
analysis includes simple linear regression and mul- 
tiple regression, with estimation of parameters and 
tests of hypothesis and confidence intervals for 
regression coefficients and the variance of the error 
term. PR6R6QUISIT6S: College algebra. 



184 



OPERATIONS R€S€RRCH 



OS 3104 Statistics for Science and engineering 

(4-0) 

Acquaint the engineering student with the tech- 
niques of statistical data analysis with examples 
from quality control, life testing, reliability and sam- 
pling inspection. Histograms and empirical distribu- 
tions and random variables are introduced along 
with their probability distributions and associated 
characteristics such as moments and percentiles. 
Following a brief introduction to decision making, 
standard tests of hypotheses and confidence inter- 
vals for both one and two parameter situations are 
treated. Regression analysis is related to least 
squares estimation and associated tests of hy- 
potheses and confidence intervals treated. Ad- 
ditional techniques of data analysis using nonpara- 
metric procedures are developed. Quality control 
charts are discussed as applications along with 
sampling inspection by attributes and by variables. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: Calculus. 

OS 3105 Statistical Analysis for Management I 
(4-1) 

The first of a two quarter course in the use of the 
tools of probability and statistics oriented toward 
management applications. Skills in numerical comp- 
utation are developed in laboratory periods 
through the use of MINITAB. €mphasis in the lec- 
tures is placed on modeling problems and inter- 
preting results. Those aspects of probability struc- 
ture that are germaine to distributions such as the 
binomial and normal. Standard topics of statistical 
inference for one and two variables are introduced 
in the settings of both hypothesis testing and confi- 
dence interval estimation. PR€R€QUISIT€: MA 2300. 

OS 3106 Statistical Analysis for Management II 

(4-1) 

The second of a two-quarter course in the use of 
the tools of probability and statistics oriented to- 
ward management applications. Using the tools 
and skills developed in OS 3105, the course con- 
sists of a general study of linear models. Analysis 
of variance for one and two way models is followed 
by simple linear and multiple regression including 
such topics as curve fitting, residual analysis, and 
stepwise regression, along with correlation anal- 
ysis. Again the computer is used as a tool to facili- 
tate computations with emphasis on statistical 
packages for large data bases, such as SPSS and 
SAS. The course concludes with a sampling of non- 
parametric procedures. PR€R€QUISIT€: OS 3105. 

OS 3301 Systems effectiveness Concepts and 
Methods (4-0). 

An introduction to system reliability, maintainabil- 
ity, and effectiveness analysis. Failure (repair) 
rates and mean times to failure (repair). Models for 
aging and completion. Block diagrams and fault 
trees. Life testing. Availability, interval reliability, 
and the synthesis of reliability, maintainability, and 
effectiveness analysis. PR€fl€QUISIT€S: OS 3105, 
OS 3106. 



185 



OS 3303 Computer Simulation (4-1 ). 

Design, implementation and use of digital simula- 
tion models will be covered with special emphasis 
on features common to ASLU problems. War gaming 
will be discussed and a game using the digital 
computer will be played and critiqued by the class. 
Cxercise planning and analysis will be treated. 
Basic topics are explained including computer gen- 
eration of random variates, statistical design and 
monitoring of model progress, machine representa- 
tion of dynamic data structures, model verification 
and validation on special purpose simulation and 
gaming languages. PR€R€QUISIT€S: OS 2103, OS 
3604 or equivalent, and a working knowledge of 
FORTRAN programming. 

OS 3401 Human Factors engineering (3-0). 
An introduction to human factors engineering for 
students in fields such as engineering. Designed to 
give the student an appreciation of man's capaci- 
ties and limitations and how these can affect the 
optimum design of the man-machines system. 
C-mphasis on integration of human factors into the 
system development cycle considering such topics 
as manpower/personnel costs, control and display 
design, human energy expenditure, physiological 
costs, and evaluation systems. PR6R6QUISITC-: A 
previous course in probability and statistics. 
OS 3402 Human Vigilance Performance (3-1). 
Course involves an examination of man's attentive- 
ness and capability in the detection of changes in 
stimulus events over prolonged periods of obser- 
vation. Topics to be covered include theories of vig- 
ilance; task, signal, subject and environmental influ- 
ences on performance; physiological and psycho- 
logical responses and vigilance performance mea- 
surement. This course is designed for the ASLU cur- 
riculum. PR6R6QUISIT6: None. 
OS 3403 Human Factors in electronic UJarfare 
(3-1). 

This course will provide the student with the ability 
t evaluate and predict human performance in speci- 
fied operational environments. The effects of stress 
factors such as noise, temperature, motion, work- 
load, etc., on various aspects of human perfor- 
mance will be studied. Students will identify the 
control and display requirements or an €UJ system 
and design a workspace to accommodate an 6LU 
data reduction/analysis system. PRC-R€QUISIT€: 
OS 3604. 

OS 3404 Man-Machine Interaction (3-0). 
An introduction to the man-machine interface prob- 
lems in C3. Information, display and human com- 
munication requirements for effective C3. Applied 
orientation with student receiving his own comput- 
erized mailbox on the ARPAN6T enabling him to ex- 
perience message handling systems, query lan- 
guages, computer to computer communications 
between the U.S. and Curope, command and con- 
trol applications programs, file transfer between 
host computers, etc. PR6R6QUISIT6S: enrollment in 
C3. 



OPERATIONS R6S6ARCH 



OS 3601 Search, Detection, and Localization 
Models (4-0). 

Rn introduction to the decision problems associ- 
ated with Navy detection systems. The relation of 
detection models to search and localization mod- 
els, measures of effectiveness of search/detection 
systems, and the optimum allocation of search 
effort are discussed. This course is designed for the 
flSUU curriculum. PR€R€QUISIT€S: OS 2103 and 
S6CR6T clearance. 

OS 3602 Introduction to Combat Models and Wea- 
pons effectiveness (4-1 ). 

This course deals with the application of quantita- 
tive models to military problems. Topics include 
Lanchester's theory, game theory, reliability the- 
ory, systems effectiveness, and war gaming. This 
course is designed for the flSUU curriculum. PR€R€Q- 
UISIT6S: OS 2103 and MR 2129. 

OS 3603 Simulation and War Gaming (3-1 ). 
Design, implementation and use of digital simula- 
tion models will be covered with special emphasis 
on features common to C3 and 6UU problems. War 
gaming will be discussed and a game using the dig- 
ital computer will be played and critiqued by the 
class. Cxercise planning and analysis will be 
treated. Basic topics are explained including com- 
puter generation of random variates, statistical 
design and monitoring of model progress, machine 
representation of dynamic data structures, model 
verification and validation on special purpose sim- 
ulation and gaming languages. PR6R6QUISIT6S: OS 
2103, OS 3604 or equivalent, and a working knowl- 
edge of FORTRRN programming. S6CRCT clearance 
required. 

OS 3604 Decision and Data Analysis (4-0). 
This course provides an introduction to the tech- 
niques of decision analysis, statistics and data 
analysis. It is primarily for students in the RSW, C-W 
and C3 curricula, Cmphasis is placed on the analysis 
of data and decision making in the RSW, €W and C3 
environments. PRC-RCQUISIT6S: OS 2103 or equiv- 
alent. 

OS 3636 Architecture of C3I Systems (4-0). 
This course is primarily intended for students in the 
command and control program. It provides on intro- 
duction to the evaluation and modeling of com- 
mand-control-communications-and intelligence 
(C3I) systems, with an emphasis on the compara- 
tive anatomy of Slue and Red systems and opera- 
tional intelligence. The student is introduced to 
concepts pertaining to the design, functioning, and 
evaluation of such large-scale systems and their 
architecture. PR6R6QUISITC-S: U.S. citizenship and 
TOP S6CRC-T clearance with eligibility for SSI. 

OS 3637 Soviet Operations and Systems 

This course is intended for students in any of the 
operational curricula (but primarily the C3 pro- 
gram). It provides an introduction to Soviet think- 



ing, conceptualization of military affairs, systems, 
and operations. Soviet control concepts, including 
troop control, control of combat means, and the 
role of automation, are emphasized. The systems 
approach to integrating different types of intel- 
ligence data to support U.S. defense (including 
command) decision making is considered. The 
course stresses the understanding of Soviet key 
words and concepts in military affairs. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6S: U.S. citizenship and TOP S€CR€T clearance 
with eligibility for SI/SRO. 

OS 3702 Manpower Requirements Determination 

(4-0). 

The objective is to enable the student to use some 
o the tools of industrial engineering in the determi- 
nation of the quantity and quality of manpower re- 
quired in military systems. Techniques include mo- 
tion and time study, work sampling, predetermined 
time standards, work design and layout, materials 
handling, procedures review and process design. 
Rpplications for ship and squadron manning docu- 
ments and SHOR6STRMPS are included. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6S: OS 3006 or OR 3201 and OR 3301. 

Graduate Courses 

OS 4601 Test and evaluation (4-0). 
Designed for system technology students, this 
course examines problems associated with tests 
and evaluations of weapon systems and tactics. 
Included are concepts from experimental design, 
regression analysis, life testing, data analysis. 
Realistic data sets and examples are discussed 
and analyzed. PR6RC-QUISIT6: Inferential statistics. 

OS 4602 C3 Systems evaluation (2-4). 
This course is designed for Systems Technology 
students in the Command, Control and Communica- 
tions Curriculum. The course deals with techniques 
for the design, implementation and analysis of ex- 
periments or exercises aimed at the test and eval- 
uation of systems, toctics, or operational concepts 
Course topics include modeling, experimentation 
methodology, design of experiments, multi-criteria 
decision analysis, reliability, and man-machine 
interaction. Case studies and real data will be 
examined. Students will actively participate in eval- 
uations through laboratory experiments. Pfl€- 
R6QUISIT6S: OS 3008, OS 3603, OS 3604, S€CR€T 
NOFORN clearance. 

OS 4701 Manpower and Personnel Models (4-0). 
The objective of this course is to introduce the stu- 
dent to the major types of manpower and person- 
nel models for estimating the effects of policy 
changes on the personnel system. Topics include 
longitudinal and cross-section models, optimiza- 
tion models, data requirements and validation. 
Rpplications in the form of current military models 
are included. PR6R6QUISIT6S: OS 3006 and OS 
3106. 



186 



PHYSICS 



D€PfiRTM€NT OF PHVSICS 



Chairman: 

Gordon 6. Schocher, Professor, 

Code 61 Sq, Sponogel Hall, Room 100, 

(408) 646-2486, RV 878-2486. 

Rssodote Chairmen: 

fidministration: 

LUilliom B. Zeleny, Associate Professor, 
Code 61 Zl, Sponogel Holl, Room 206C, 
(408) 646-2952, RV 878-2952. 

Instruction: 

Karlheinz €. UJoehler, Professor, 

Code 61 Wh, Sponogel Holl, Room 2068, 

(408) 646-2029, RV 878-2029 

expertise in the Deportment of Physics and 
efforts in research and teaching of graduate 
specialization courses for the last twenty 
years can be summarized under the heading 
"physics of propagation phenomena in realis- 
tic, complex environments". Specialized 
course sequences are offered in the following 
areas: 



1. 
tion. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



Optical Signal Propagation and Detec- 



Directed energy UUeapon Systems 
Nuclear UUeapons and their effects 
Underwater Rcoustics 
Physics of the Space and Satellite 
Environment 

6. Physics of Solids and Solid State 
devices 

7. Classical Field Theory 

Rll of these specializations, except the last, 
are of obvious relevance to modern and fu- 
ture weapon technologies. The faculty sup- 
ports an ongoing research program in these 
areas, and student thesis topics are avail- 
able in all of them. 

D€GR€€ R€QUIR€M€NTS 

The Department of Physics offers the MS 
degree in Physics and in engineering Science. 
In addition, the Ph.D. is offered by the Depart- 
ment. Upon approval by the Department, 
courses taken at other institutions may be 
applied towards satisfying degree require- 
ments. 



MRST€R OF SCI€NC€ IN PHVSICS 

R candidate for the degree Master of Sci- 
ence in Physics must complete satisfactorily a 
program of study which includes a minimum of 
30 quarter hours of physics courses (not in- 
cluding thesis) distributed among courses at 
the graduate level; of these 30 hours at least 
1 5 hours must be at the 4000 level. Upon ap- 
proval of the Chairman of the Physics Depart- 
ment, a maximum of 4 hours of courses taken 
in another department may be applied to- 
ward satisfying the above requirements. In 
lieu of the preceding requirements, students 
who are qualified to pursue graduate courses 
in physics when they arrive at the Naval Post- 
graduate School may complete a minimum of 
20 hours entirely of 4000 level physics 
courses. In addition, all students must pre- 
sent an acceptable thesis. 

The following specific course requirements 
must be successfully completed for a student 
to earn the degree of Master of Science in 
Physics: 

a Thermodynamics and Statistical me- 
chanics — the student must take a two- 
quarter sequence or present equivalent prep- 
aration in this area. 

b. R course in Rdvanced Mechanics or 
Quantum Mechanics. 

c. R course in Clectromagnetism at the 
4000 level. 

d. Rn advanced course in Modern Physics. 

e. Specialization, to include at least two 
advanced courses in an area of specializa- 
tion. 

Programs leading to the Master of Science 
degree in Physics must be approved by the 
Chairman of the Department of Physics. 

MRST€R Of SCI€NC€ 
IN €NGIN€€RING SCI€NC€ 

Students of the UUeapon Systems engine- 
ering Curriculum (530) who elect a Physics 
area as their specialization option will receive 
the degree Master of Science in engineering 
Science. The program must include at least 36 
credit hours of graduate work in engineering, 
science and mathematics, at least 1 2 of which 
must be at the 4000 level. Of these 36 hours, 



187 



PHVSICS 



at least 20 hours, including work at the 4000 
level, must be in the Department of Physics. 
This will be the major department, and cogni- 
zance over the specialization course se- 
quences, thesis research areas and the de- 
gree resides with the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Physics. 

In addition to the major, the program must 
contain at least 12 hours at the graduate 
level in courses representing areas other 
than the major. 

The candidate must present an acceptable 
thesis on a topic given prior approval by the 
Department of Physics. Final approval of the 
program leading to the Master of Science in 
engineering Science with major in Physics 
shall be obtained from the Chairman of the 
Department of Physics. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Ph.D. degree is offered in the Depart- 
ment in several areas of specialization which 
currently include Acoustics, Atomic Physics, 
Solid State Physics, Theoretical Physics, Nuc- 
lear Physics and Plasma Physics. 

Requirements for the degree may be 
grouped into 3 categories: courses, thesis re- 
search and examinations in major and minor 
fields. 

The required examinations are outlined 
under the general school requirements for the 
Doctor's degree. In addition to the school re- 
quirements, the Department requires a pre- 
liminary examination to show evidence of ac- 
ceptability as a doctoral student. 

The usual courses to be taken by the candi- 
date include Classical electrodynamics, 
Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Physics. 
(PH 4371, 4971, 4972, 4973, 4771, 4772). 
Suitable electives are to be chosen in phsyics 
and the minor fields, mainly from the list of 
graduate level courses. 



ed by a Pulserad 1 1 2 single pulse electron 
accelerator producing a 1.8 MeV, 40 kilo- 
ampere beam of 50 nanosecond duration. 
Both machines are suitable for studies of 
radiation effects in semiconductor devices 
and electromagnetic pulse generation. 

The electro-optics laboratory uses imaging 
and detecting systems from the far infrared to 
the visible range including instrumentation for 
seagoing experiments in optical propaga- 
tion. The laser laboratory contains a giant 
pulse laser and associated detection equip- 
ment for the visible spectrum as well as a high 
power laser in the IR region. 

The plasma physics laboratory includes a 
plasma system, diagnostic equipment for 
studies of plasma dynamics, and a steady 
state plasma source with magnetic fields to 
10,000 gauss. 

The spectroscopy equipment includes a 
large grating spectrograph, a large prism 
spectrograph, and an infrared spectrophoto- 
meter. The spectroscopic data center con- 
tains a comprehensive compilation of the 
known energy levels and atomic spectral 
lines in the vacuum ultraviolet range. 

The acoustics laboratory equipment in- 
cludes a large anechoic chamber, a small 
reverberation chamber, and a multiple-unit 
acoustics laboratory for student experimen- 
tation in airborne acoustics. Sonar equip- 
ment, test and wave tanks, and instrumenta- 
tion for investigation in underwater sound 
comprise the underwater acoustics labora- 
tory. 



D€PRRTM€NTRl COURS€ 
OFFERINGS 



PHVSICS 



PHVSICS LRBORRTORI€S 

The physics laboratories are equipped to 
carry on instructional and research work in 
atomic physics, nuclear physics, sold state 
physics, electro-optics, plasma physics, spec- 
troscopy, and acoustics. 

The 100 MeV electron linear accelerator 
provides a pulsed electron beam of 1 micro- 
ampere average current and is used for radia- 
tion studies. This machine is being . augment- 



PH 0110 Refresher Physics (5-3). 
NON-CR6DIT. R six-week refresher course of select- 
ed topics from elementary mechanics for incoming 
students. Typical topics are kinematics, Newton's 
Laws, the concepts of work, energy, and linear mo- 
mentum, and simple harmonic motion. Vector alge- 
bra and some aspects of calculus are developed as 
needed and their use is emphasized. The two 
ninety-minute laboratory periods are devoted to 
guided problem solving. PR€R€QUISIT€S: Previous 
college courses in elementary physics and integral 
calculus. 



188 



PHVSICS 



PH 0499 Acoustics Colloquium (0-1). 
Reports on current research, and study of recent re- 
search literature in conjunction with the student 
thesis. PR6R6QUISIT6: fl course in acoustics. 

PH 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

every student conducting thesis research will enroll 

in this course. 

PH 0999 Physics Colloquium (0-1 ). 

Discussion of topics of current interest by NPS and 
outside guest speakers. 



Lower Division Courses 

The sequence of introductory physics courses 
PH 1101. PH 1702, PH 1303 is intended for stu- 
dents with little or no background in mathematics 
or physics. €mphasis is therefore placed on the de- 
velopment of problem solving skills. These courses 
are given on a six week accelerated schedule, and 
on a pass/fail basis. 

The sequence of courses PH 1 1 1 1 and PH 1 31 2 is 
intended for students in the engineering Sciences 
(460) curriculum, and is designed to present to 
these students the physics background they will 
need for entry into various technical curricula. 

The sequence of courses PH 1 1 21 , PH 1 322, PH 
2223, and PH 2724 represent a thorough review of 
the basic principles and concepts of classical phys- 
ics. The courses will emphasize self study and prob- 
lem solving skills. These courses are intended pri- 
marily for students in the LUeapons engineering 
programs: LUS (531), LUN (532), LUT (530). 

PH 1101 Introductory Physics I: Mechanics (3-2). 
Vectors, Kinematics in one and two dimensions. 
Newton's laws, force laws, work and energy, con- 
servative forces, conservation of energy, linear 
momentum. PR6R6QUISIT6S: R course in calculus 
(may be taken concurrently). 

PH 1111 Fundamentals of Physics I: Mechanics 

(4-2). 

Vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics, work and 
energy, linear and angular momentum, conserva- 
tion laws, rotational kinematics and dynamics, 
statics, simple harmonic oscillator, gravitation. PR€- 
R6QUISIT6: R course in calculus (may be taken con- 
currently). 

PH 1121 Physics I: Mechanics (4-2). 
Vector algebra, particle kinematics in one and two 
dimensions, Newton's laws of motion, particle dy- 
namics, work, kinetic and potential energy, con- 
servation of energy, linear momentum and its con- 
servation laws, collisions, rotational kinematics and 
dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies, oscillations 
and gravitation. PRCRCQUISITC: R course in calculus 
(may be taken concurrently). 



PH 1303 Introductory Physics III: electricity and 
Magnetism (3-2). 

Charge and Coulomb's Law, electric field, Gauss' 
Law, electric potential, current and resistance, elec- 
tromotive force, magnetic field. Ampere's Law, 
Faraday's Law. PRCRCQUISITCS: PH 1101 and a 
course in calculus. 

PH 1 312 Fundamentals of Physics II: electricity and 
Magnetism (4-2). 

Clectric field and potential, Gauss' Law, capacitors, 
simple DC circuits, magnetic field, inductance, Max- 
well's equations, electromagnetic waves. PRCRCQ- 
UISIT6S: PH 1 1 1 1 or equivalent. 

PH 1 322 Physics II: electricity and Magnetism (4-0). 
electric charge, Coulomb's Law, electric field and 
potential. Gauss' Law, capacitors and dielectrics, 
current and resistance CMF and simple circuits, mag- 
netic field, Rmpere's Law, Faraday's Law, induc- 
tance, electromagnetic oscillations and waves, 
Maxwell's equations. PRCRCQUISITC: PH 1121 or 
equivalent. 

PH 1 702 Introductory Physics II: Thermodynamics 
and Wave Motion (3-2). 

Fluids, waves in elastic media, sound waves, heat 
and the First Law of Thermodynamics, kinetic theory 
of gases, entropy and the Second Law of Thermo- 
dynamics. PRCRCQUISITCS: PH 1 1 01 and a course in 
calculus. 

Upper Division Courses 
PH 2001 Physics Thesis Opportunities (1-0). 
This course is designed for students interested in 
choosing and pursuing a Master's thesis in physics. 
Members of the faculty of the Department of Phys- 
ics having research projects suitable for Master's 
degree theses will give presentations on their pro- 
jects. The course is given in the pass/fail mode. 
PRCRCQUISITC: Rt least 7 quarter-hours of physics 
courses. 

PH 2012 Physics Laboratory I (2-2). 
The first course in a two quarter sequence on lab- 
ortory measurement and analysis techniques. 
Graphical techniques, linear regression, distribu- 
tion functions, statistical analysis of data, computer 
controlled data acquisition, interfacing, communica- 
tion protocols, digital sampling. PReReQUISneS: 
PH 1121, MR 2047. 
PH 2013 Physics Laboratory II (2-2). 
The second course in a two quarter sequence on 
laboratory measurements and analysis tech- 
niques. Fourier analysis, signals in noise, phase 
sensitive detection, time windowing and averag- 
ing, goodness of fit, hypothesis testing. PRCRCQ- 
UISITC:PH 2012. 

PH 2119 Osdllation and Waves (4-1). 
Rn introductory course designed to present mech- 
anics to students studying acoustics. Kinematics, 
dynamics, and work and energy consideration for 
the free, damped, and driven oscillators. The wave 



189 



PHYSICS 



equation for transverse vibration of a string, ideal 
and realistic boundary conditions, and normal 
modes. Longitudinal waves in bars. Transverse 
waves on rectangular and circular membranes. Vi- 
brations of plates. Laboratory periods include 
problem sessions and experiments on introduction 
to experimental techniques and the handling of 
data; the simple harmonic oscillator analog; trans- 
verse waves on a string; and transverse, longitudin- 
al, and torsional waves on a bar. PREREQUISITE: 
Courses in differential equations and basic physics. 

PH 2151 Mechanics I — Particle Mechanics (4-1). 
After a review of the fundamental concepts of kine- 
matics and dynamics, this course concentrates on 
those two areas of dynamics of simple bodies 
which are most relevant to applications in LUeapon 
Systems Engineering: vibrations and projectile 
motion. Topics include: damped and driven oscil- 
lations, rotating coordinate systems, projectile 
motion with atmospheric friction, and satellite or- 
bits. PREREQUISITE: PH 1121 or equivalent; MR 
2121 or equivalent course in ordinary differential 
equations (may be concurrent). 

PH 2203 Topics in Basic Physics: Waves and Optics 
(4-0). 

R course to provide physical background to wave 
motion, acoustics, and optics for students in the 
Electronic LUarfare Curriculum, and to provide appli- 
cations of analytical techniques to physical prob- 
lems. Rreas covered ore harmonic motion-differen- 
tial equations, complex notation, damped vibration 
and resonance; wave motion (properties of waves, 
sound waves, electromagnetic waves, light waves, 
optics), geometrical and wave optics. PREREQ- 
UISITES: MR 1 1 12, MR 2129 and MR 2181 taken 
concurrently. 



PH 2265 Geometrical Optics (2-2). 
the course first introduces geometrical optics; re- 
flection and refraction of rays at plane and spheri- 
cal surfaces; mirrors, plane and spherical; lenses, 
thick lenses and lens aberration,- matrix methods for 
thick lenses and lens systems. R laboratory is in- 
cluded. Subjects to be covered include laboratory 
procedures, definition of measurement, random 
and systematic errors, propagation of uncertain- 
ties, graphical and analytical treatment of data, 
statistical concepts, focal length of lens and mirror, 
refractive index of glass, thick lens, optical instru- 
ments, optical spectra, and prism spectrometer. 
PREREQUISITE: R course in basic physics. 



PH 2304 Topics in Basic Physics: €lectromagnetism 

(2-0). 

This course follows PH 2203. Basic concepts of 
electric and magnetic fields are introduced and 
their interaction with charges and currents dis- 
cussed. The experimental laws are used to develop 
Maxwell's Equations, and simple solutions to these 
equations are considered. PREREQUISITES: PH 
2203 or equivalent, and mathematics through vec- 
tor analysis and ordinary differential equations. 



PH 2351 €lectromoanetism (4-1). 
Electrostatic fields in vacuum and dielectrics, Pois- 
son's and Laplace's equations, electrostatic ener- 
gy, electric current. The magnetic field of steady cur- 
rents, 8iot-Savart and Rmpere's Laws, vector po- 
tential, magnetic properties of matter. Electromag- 
netic induction and Faraday's Law. Magnetic ener- 
gy. PREREQUISITES: PH 1 322 or equivalent, MR 
2047 or equivalent. 



PH 2207 Fundamentals of Electro — Optics (4-0). 
This course is designed to provide the background 
knowledge for electro— optics to students in inter- 
disciplinary curricula. Topics discussed include: ma- 
trix formulation of optics, catoptric and catadioptric 
systems, diffraction, behavior of gaussian profile 
beams, Fourier optics and resolution, atmospheric 
transmission, atomic and molecular energy states, 
line shapes, band theory of semiconductors, the 
p— n junction, light emitting diodes, stimulated 
emission, and lasers. PREREQUISITES: MR 31 39 and 
PH 2304 (or equivalent). 



PH 2401 Introduction to the Sonar Equations (3-0). 
R discussion of each term of the sonar equations, 
with application to the detection, localization, and 
classification of underwater vehicles. Topics in- 
clude ray acoustics, simple transmission loss mod- 
els, tonals, spectrum and band levels, directivity in- 
dex, array gain, doppler shift, and detection thresh- 
old. This course is intended primarily for students in 
the Antisubmarine LUarfare curriculum and is given 
in a "structured" PSI mode. PREREQUISITE: Precal- 
culus mathematics. (May be taken through Continu- 
ing Education as mini-courses PH 2474-76). 



PH 2223 Physics III: Optics (4-2). 
Geometrical optics; reflection and refraction of rays 
at plane and spherical surfaces; mirrors, plane and 
spherical; lenses, thick lenses and lens aberration; 
matrix methods for thick lenses and lens systems. 
Physical optics, wave equation, phase and group 
velocity, Fourier transforms, interference, diffrac- 
tion, polarization, birefringence. PREREQUISITES: PH 
1 322 and a course in differential equotions. 



PH 2502 Introduction to Space Mechanics (4-0). 
R review of the basic concepts of Newtonian mech- 
anics. Inverse square force law, geometric and 
energy relations for simple orbits, equations for 
rocket motion. Definitions and properties of electric 
and magnetic fields. Motion of charged particles in 
electric and magnetic fields. PREREQUSITES: Basic 
physics and calculus. 



190 



PHVSICS 



PH 2641 Modern Physics for engineers (4-0). 
fin introductory course intended to import o brood 
background in modern physics. The course begins 
with a brief review of classical mechanics and elec- 
tromagnetism, followed by atomic and molecular 
structure and spectra. Black body radiation, photo- 
electric effect, emission and absorption of radiation 
by atoms and molecules, and the energy band 
architecture of solids lead to on introduction to ap- 
plications in lasers, semiconductors, and microwave 
devices. Applications may be tailored to suit the 
interests of the instructor and the class. PR6R6QUI- 
SIT6: 6lementary calculus and a course in basic 
physics, or consent of the Instructor. 



PH 2681 introductory Quantum Physics (4-2). 
Special relativity plus the fundamental concepts of 
quantization in modern physics. Topics include the 
Bohr atom, blackbody radiation, wove— particle 
duality, the Schroedinger equation and its applica- 
tion to potential barriers and wells, and to the har- 
monic oscillator and the hydrogen atom. Also the 
Pauli exclusion principle, spin and angular momen- 
tum. PR€R€QUISIT€: PH 2223. R course in theoreti- 
cal physics (PH 3990) desirable but not mandatory. 



PH 2724 Physics IV: Thermodynamics, Fluids and 
Acoustics (4-0). 

Temperature concept, heat and the first Law of 
Thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, entropy 
and Second Low of Thermodynamics, fluid statics, 
fluid dynamics, drag waves in elastic media, sound 
waves, speed and obsorption of sound in the 
ocean, refraction of sound waves, detection theory 
and thresholds, active and passive sonar. PR6RCQ- 
UISIT6S: PH 1121 and a course in differential equa- 
tions 



PH 2810 Survey of Nuclear Physics (4-0). 
Rn introduction to the basic concepts of nuclear 
physics with emphasis on neutron physics and nu- 
clear reactors. Atomic nature of matter, wave- 
particle duality, energy levels. Basic nuclear prop- 
erties, radioactivity, neutron reactions. Clements of 
fission and fusion reactors. PRCRC-QUISITC: Basic 
Physics. 



PH 2911 Introduction to Computational Physics 
(3-2). 

Rn introduction to the role of computation in mod- 
ern physics, with emphasis on the programming of 
current physics problems. Includes an introduction 
to mainframe operations in both the time-sharing 
and batch environments. Rlgorithmic design and 
structured programming will be emphasized. Cxer- 
cises, chosen to emphasize physical objectives, will 
be assigned in LURTFIV and FORTRAN. CORCQUI- 
SrT€: fl BASIC physics course. 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

PH 3002 Non-Acoustic Sensor Systems (4-0). 
This course covers the physical principles under- 
lying the operation of a number of operational and 
proposed non-acoustic sensor systems. Geo- 
magnetism, magnetometers and gradiometers, 
MAD signatures, optical and IR transmission in the 
atmosphere and in sea water. FUR and radar sys- 
tems for ASUJ. Cxotic detection schemes. PRCRCQ- 
UISIT6S: PH 3306, €C- 3714, SC-CRCT clearance. 

PH 3006 Weapons Systems and Weapons effects 
(4-0). 

This course will cover technical aspects of three 
areas of modern weapons systems: Nuclear weap- 
ons and effects on personnel, equipment and struc- 
tures; principles of directed energy weapon con- 
cepts and their interactions with targets; space 
based defense system concepts. PRCRC-QUISITCS: 
PH 3301 or equivalent. 

PH 3152 Mechanics II - extended Systems (4-1 ). 

The principles of dynamics are applied to real ex- 
tended bodies. Topics include: principles of rocket 
propulsion, rotational motion of axisymmetric bod- 
ies and its application to projectile spin and gyro- 
scopic motion. Rn introduction to generalized meth- 
ods of description of dynamic systems is given and 
the general behavior of complex vibrating systems 
is studied. PRCRCQUISITC: PH 2151. 

PH 3161 fluid Dynamics (4-1). 
This course emphasizes the dynamics of real com- 
pressible fluids. The basic properties of fluids are 
introduced and the concepts of fluid kinematics, 
stress, and strain are discussed. Both the control- 
volume and differential equation approaches are 
applied to the flow of a viscous fluid. The laws of 
similarity are developed, and the significance of 
Reynolds, Froude, and Mach number discussed. 
Topics covered include laminar and turbulent flow, 
isentropic subsonic channel flow, supersonic flow in 
nozzels, and two-dimensional supersonic flow. 
PRCRCQUISITC: PH 2151 or equivalent. 

PH 3166 Physics of Underwater Vehides (4-2). 
This course emphasizes the dynamics of real in- 
compressible fluids. The basic properties of fluids 
are introduced and the concepts of fluid kinematics, 
stress, and strain are discussed. Both the control- 
volume and the differential equation approaches 
ore applied to the flow of a viscous fluid. The laws 
of similarity are developed, and the significance of 
Reynolds, Froude, and Mach numbers are discus- 
sed. Topics covered include laminar flow, turbulent 
flow, boundary layer theory, and the calculation of 
lift and drag. One or more special topics may be 
discussed (surface waves, cavitation, and the fluid- 
dynamic generation of sound) depending upon the 
interests of the instructor and students. PRCRCQ- 
UISIT€: PH 2151 or equivalent. 



191 



PHVSICS 



PH 3208 €lectro-Optic Principles and Devices (4-0). 
This course is designed to provide students in inter- 
disciplinary programs with on understanding of the 
principles and capabilities of the component de- 
vices comprising military electro-optic and infra- 
red systems. Topics treated include: atmospheric 
extinction, turbulence effects on optical transmis- 
sion and imaging, thermal blooming and break- 
down, adaptive optics, thermal radiation, target 
signatures, backgrounds, modulators and shutters, 
beam steerers, reticles, detector characteristics 
and types, detector noise and cooling, imaging de- 
tectors for intensifiers, television and FUR, CCD and 
CD devices, and displays. PR€R€QUISIT€: PH 2207 
or equivalent. 

PH 3252 €lectro -Optics (4-0). 
This course treats the properties of electro-optic 
systems together with the basic physical principles 
involved. Topics included are: diffraction and Fourier 
transform methods; optical data processing,- holog- 
raphy; Fresnel equations, evanescent waves, film 
and fiber optics; Gaussian beams and laser res- 
onators; molecular spectra, transition probability, 
line widths, and laser gain; specific lasers, Q- 
switching and mode locking; semi-conductors, Bril- 
louin zones, junction diodes, photodetection, light 
emitting diodes and diode lasers. PR6R6QUISIT6S: 
PH 3352, PH 3683, or equivalents. 



PH 3301 Radiating Systems (4-0). 
This course for students of Operations Research 
and other UJeopon System oriented non-engineer- 
ing curricula discusses the physical principles ex- 
ploited by information gathering systems with 
emphasis on general capabilities and limitations. 
After o general introduction to wave propagation, 
topics of discussion ore electromagnetic waves, 
radar, electro-optics including lasers, and under- 
water sound. These topics will be applied to specif- 
ic systems such as missile guidance, sonobouys, 
and phased arrays, as appropriate to the class and 
instructor. PR€R€QUISIT€S: MR 11 1 6 or equivalent 
may be taken concurrently, or by consent of In- 
structor. 



PH 3306 electromagnetic Wave Propagation 

(4-0). 

This course is designed for the flSUU curriculum and 
may be taught as an accelerated 6-week course, 
fin introduction to Maxwell's equations and the 
basic properties of electromagnetic wave propa- 
gation in various medio and the interface between 
medio. These concepts are applied to wave prop- 
agation in the sea, the atmosphere and the iono- 
sphere. Basic properties of antennas and wave- 
guides. PR6R€QUISIT€S: R basic course in electricity 
and magnetism, vectors, and differential equa- 
tions. 



PH 3352 electromagnetic Woves (4-0). 
Maxwell's equations. Plane waves in vacuum and 
dielectrics, boundary conditions, enery density and 
Poynting vector. Polarization. Reflection and re- 
fraction at dielectric and conducting boundaries for 
normal and oblique incidence, electromagnetic 
propagation in conductors, with emphasis on sea 
water, metals, and the ionosphere. Waveguides. 
Radiation from a dipole antenna, qualitative treat- 
ment of antenna arrays and antenna patterns. 
PRCR6QUISIT6: PH 2351. 

PH 3360 electromagnetic Wove Propagation 

(4-1). 

Introduction to vector fields and the physical basis 
of Maxwell's equations. Wave propagation in a 
vacuum, and in dielectrics and conductors. Reflec- 
tion and refraction at the interface between media. 
Guided waves, radiation from a dipole, and waves 
in the ionosphere. PR€R6QUISIT€S: MR 2047, MR 
31 32 (or PH 3990), and PH 21 51 . 

PH 3402 Underwater Acoustics (4-2). 
The third of a four-course sequence in acoustics for 
students in the RSW curriculum, this course is an 
analytical study of those aspects of underwater 
sound that influence the sonar equations. Topics in- 
clude: The wave equation in fluids; acoustic proper- 
ties of fluids; plane, spherical, and cylindrical 
waves; absorption of sound in sea water; simple 
sources; transducer properties and sensitivities; 
surface interference; the three-element array; nor- 
mal and oblique incidence reflection and trans- 
mission at boundaries; image theory and the shal- 
low-water channel; continuous line source and the 
plane circular piston; radiation impedance; linear 
arrays with steering,- the Gkonal Equation and ray 
theory. Laboratory experiments include advanced 
acoustic instrumentation, longitudinal waves in an 
air— filled tube, surface interference, properties of 
underwater transducers, and the 3-element array. 
PR€R€QUISIT€: PH 2401. 

PH 3406 Physics of Sound in the Ocean (4-2). 
R survey of physical acoustics with emphasis on the 
generation, propagation, and detection of sound in 
the ocean. Topics include: the acoustic wove equa- 
tion and its limitation in fluids; solutions for plane 
and diverging waves; ray acoustics; radiation of 
sound; reflection from boundaries; normal mode 
propagation in the ocean; effects of inhomogene- 
ities ond sound absorption; term by term analysis 
of the sonar equations emphasizing transmission 
loss models and detection threshold models; prop- 
erties of transducers for underwater sound. Labora- 
tory experiments include surface interference, 
spectral analysis of noise, normal modes, wave- 
guides, and acoustical sources. PR€R€QUISIT€S: fl 
course in general physics, a course in differential 
equations, and working knowledge of complex ex- 
ponential notation. 



192 



PHVSICS 



PH 3421 Acoustic Wave Propagation (4-1 ). 
Development of and solutions to the acoustic ujave 
equation in extended media. Propagation of plane 
waves in fluids and reflection and transmission of 
plane boundaries. Steady state response of acous- 
tic cavities and propagation in waveguides. Sound 
absorption and dispersion for classical fluids. The 
C-ikonal €quation and necessary conditions for ray 
acoustics; refraction and ray diagrams. Method of 
images Mode propagation in shallow water chan- 
nels. Laboratory experiments on selected topics. 
PR€fl€QUISIT€S: R course in basic mechanics and a 
course in differential equations. 
PH 3451 Fundamental Acoustics (4-2). 
Development of, and solutioas to, the acoustic 
wove equation in fluids. Propagation of plane, 
spherical and cylindrical waves in fluids, sound 
pressure level, intensity, and specific acoustic 
impedance. Normal and oblique incidence reflec- 
tion and transmission from plane boundaries. 
Transmission through a layer. Image theory and 
surface interference. Sound absorption and disper- 
sion for classical and relaxing fluids. Acoustic be- 
havior of sources and arrays, continuous line 
source, plane circular piston, radiation impedance, 
and the steered line array. Transducer properties, 
sensitivities, and calibration. Laboratory experi- 
ments include longitudinal waves in an air-filled 
tube, surface interference, properties of under- 
water transducers, three-element array, reciproc- 
ity calibration, speed of sound in water, and ab- 
sorption in gases. PR6RCQUISIT6: PH 21 19. 
PH 3452 Underwater flcoustics^WJT V~ X 
This course is a continuation of PH 3451. Lumped 
acoustic elements and the resonant bubble. Nor- 
mal modes in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical 
enclosures. Steady-state response of acoustic 
waveguides of constant cross section, propagating 
and evanescent modes, and group and phase 
speeds. Transmission of sound in the ocean, the s 
Cikonal €quation and necessary conditions for ray 
theory, and refraction and ray diagrams. Sound 
propagation in the mixed layer, the convergence 
zone, and the deep sound channel. Passive sonar 
equation, ambient noise, and doppler effect and 
bandwidth considerations. Rctive sonar equations, 
target strength and reverberation. Laboratory ex- 
periments include Helmholtz resonators, normal 
modes in cylindrical enclosures, water-filled wave- 
guide, and noise analysis. PR€R€QUISIT€: PH 3451 . 
PH 3458 Noise, Shock and Vibration Control (4-0). 
The application of the principles of acoustics and 
mechanics to the problems of controlling noise, 
vibration and mechanical shock. Topics include 
Linear mechanical vibrations; introduction to vibra- 
tions of non-linear systems; damping mecha- 
nisms; vibration and shock isolation; noise genera- 
tion and control; effects of noise on man; applica- 
tion to problems of Naval interest such as ship 
quieting and industrial noise control. PRCRC-QUI- 
SIT6: R course in acoustics. 



PH 3461 explosives and explosions (4-1). 
€xplosives terminology; manufacturing and testing 
of high explosives and propellents; flame tempera- 
tures; thermochemistry of explosive decomposi- 
tion; the detonation state; explosives safety. Gen- 
eration and propagation of explosive shock waves 
in air.Rankine-Hugoniot equations; scaling laws; 
normal, oblique, and Mach reflection. Dynamic blast 
loads and corresponding structure response. PR€- 
R6QUISIT6: PH 2724 or equivalent. 

PH 3463 Special Topics in Underwater Rcoustics 
and Sound (3-2). 

Special topics of interest in the areas of under- 
water sound, transduction, propagation and de- 
tection, depending on the interests and needs of 
the students. PR6R6QUISIT6: PH 3431 or PH 3452 or 
PH 3472. 

PH 3479 Physics of Underwater Weapons (3-0). 
The basic physics of underwater weapons from 
launch through explosion are addressed using a 
modern acoustic torpedo to illustrate practical ap- 
plications. Topics include initial inputs, water entry, 
power plants, propulsors, drag and drag reduction, 
stability and control, guidance, acoustic search, ter- 
minal homing, exploders, and explosions. Rn histori- 
cal summary of U.S. torpedoes and depth charges 
and a review of current NRTO and Soviet torpedoes 
are also presented. PR€R€QUISIT€S: R course in 
acoustics and a SC-CR6T NOFORN clearance. 

PH 3513 Intermediate Orbital Mechanics (4-0). 
Review of basic orbital properties. Orbital ele- 
ments, orbit determination from observations, 
ground track and earth coverage, basic orbital ma- 
neuvers, position and velocity as function of time, 
ballistic missile trajectories, lunar and interplane- 
tary trajectories. PR6R6QUISITI6S: PH 2502 or PH 
2151. 

PH 3514 Introduction to the Space environment 

(4-0). 

Plasma concepts. Solar structure and magnetic 
field, particle and electromagnetic emissions from 
the sun, the geomagnetic field, radiation belts, 
structure and properties of the earth's upper atmo- 
sphere.ionosphere, the effects of man in the space 
environment. PR€R€QUISfT€S: Calculus and PH 
1312. 

PH 3520 Introduction to Space Plasmas (4-0). 
Definition of plasma, single particle motions in elec- 
tric and magnetic fields, invariants of motion, plas- 
ma fluid equations, plasma waves and oscillation, 
applications to solar wind, ionosphere and mag- 
netosphere. PR€R€QUISIT€: PH 3360 or equivalent. 

PH 3683 Intermediate Quantum Physics (4-2). 
Rpplies the fundamental concepts of quantum 
physics to the development and application of 
theoretical methods for dealing with real systems. 
Time-independent and time-dependent perturba- 



193 



PHYSICS 



tion theory. The hellium atom, many electron atoms 
and spectra, the periodic table, diatomic mol- 
ecules, losers, solids, semiconductors and super- 
conductivity. PRC-RC-QUISIT6S: PH 2681. PH 3990, 
and PH 3782 (the latter may be taken concur- 
rently). 

PH 3782 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics 

(4-0). 

€ntropy, temperature, Boltzmann factor and Gibbs 
factor ore developed from a quantum point of view. 
Blackbody radiation, chemical potential partition 
function, Gibbs sum and applications to an ideal 
gas are covered. Fermi-Dirac and 8ose-€instein 
statistics and applications to degenerate systems. 
Gibbs free energy, Helmholtz free energy.enthal- 
py, kinetic theory, phase transformations, chemical 
reactions. PRC-R6QUISIT6: PH 2681. 

PH 3855 Nuclear Physics (4-2). 
This is the first in a sequence of graduate special- 
ization courses on nuclear weapons and their ef- 
fects. This course deals with the necessary under- 
lying principles of nuclear physics, including nuclear 
forces, models, stability, reactions and decay pro- 
cesses. The laboratory includes radiation detection 
techniques and statistics of counting. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6S: PH 31 52, PH 3360, and PH 3683 or equiva- 
lents. 

PH 3911 Simulation of Physical Systems (3-1). 
Comparisons between simulation, theory and ex- 
perimentation as techniques of scientific investiga- 
tion. Computer simulation methodology and tech- 
niques: Monte Carlo and deterministric simulations, 
stochastic techniques, design of simulations, vari- 
ance reduction and analysis of results. Applications 
from physics and/or weapons performance. There 
is a one-hour applications laboratory. PR6R6Q- 
UISITCS: MR 3400, or OS 3602, or concent of In- 
structor. 

PH 3990 Methods of Theoretical Physics (4-0). 

The general methods of theoretical physics are ap- 
plied to specific problems chosen from: classical 
waves, scattering, classical electro-dynamics, reso- 
nant cavities, incompressible flow, dielectric and 
magnetic media, heat conduction, quantum mech- 
anics, and Fourier optics. Cmphasis is on the physi- 
cal applications. PRCRC-QUISIT6S: MR 2121 and a 
sequence of courses in basic physics. 

PH 3998 Spedal Topics in intermediate Physics 
(1-0 to 4-0). 

Study in one of the fields of intermediate physics 
and related applied areas selected to meet spe- 
cial needs or interest of students. The course may 
be conducted as seminar or supervised reading in 
different topics. PR6R6QUISITC: Consent of the De- 
partment Chairman. The course may also be taken 
on the Pass/Fail basis provided the student has re- 
quested so at the time of enrollment. 



Graduate Courses 
PH 4054 Partide Beam and High €nergy Laser 
Weapon Physics (4-0). 

This course is an in depth study into the beam 
weapon concepts. Topics covered are: relativistic 
electron beams; their equilibrium, propagation los- 
ses and stability; giant power accelerator con- 
cepts; target interaction,- proton beams,- neutral 
particle beams, their production and limitations,- 
high power microwave beams, high energy loser 
beams, their production, atmospheric propagation 
and control and their interaction with tragets. PR€- 
R6QUISIT6S: PH 3352, PH 2151 or equivalent, 
courses in electromagnetism and mechanics. 
S6CR6T clearance. 

PH 4171 Advanced Mechanics (4-0). 
Hamilton's Principle. The equations of motion in 
Lagrangian and Hamiltonian form. Symmetries and 
constants of the motion. The inertia tensor and rigid 
bodies. Canonical transformation and Poisson 
brackets. Small oscillations. PRC-R€QUISIT€S: PH 
31 52, PH 3360 or equivalent. 
PH 4253 Sensors, Signals, and Systems (4-2). 
This course treats the physical phenomena and 
practical problems involved in sensor systems for 
electromagnetic signals. Topics included are: opti- 
cal modulation, nonlinear optics, acousto-optics; 
specific lasers, Q-switching and mode locking; at- 
mospheric absorption and scattering of radiation; 
image intensifiers, television and FUR systems; de- 
tecting, tracking and homing systems; signal 
sources, target signatures and backgrounds; laser 
target designators, laser radars, the range equa- 
tion. The laboratory will include experiments re- 
lated to this material as well as to that of the pre- 
ceding course, PH 3252. PRCRCQUISIT6S: PH 3252 
and a course in electromagnetics. 
PH 4283 Laser Physics (4-0). 
The physics of lasers and laser radiation. Topics will 
include: spontaneous and stimulated emission, ab- 
sorption, interaction of radiation with matter, line 
broadening mechanisms, optical and electrical 
pumping, gain, properties of laser beams, Gaus- 
sian beams, stable and unstable resonators, rate 
equations, output coupling, mode locking, short 
pulsing, specifics of solid state and gas laser sys- 
tems, high energy ond high power losers, laser- 
surface interaction, air breakdown, laser supported 
detonation waves, laser isotope separation, ond 
laser fusion. PR6R6QUISIT6: PH 3252 or equivalent, 
or consent of Instructor. 

PH 4353 Topics in Advanced electricity and Magne- 
tism (4-0). 

Topics selected from: scattering and absorption of 
waves by single particles; multiple scattering; 
relativistic formalism and radiation from acceler- 
ated charges; propagation in layered conducting 
media such as the atmosphere, sea water, ocean 
floor systems. Introduction to free electron lasers. 
PR6R6QUISIT6S: PH 3352 ond PH 3990 or equiva- 
lent. 



194 



PHVSICS 



PH 4371 Classical electrodynamics (3-0). 
Tensors in special relativity. Classical relativistic 
electromagnetic field theory. Lorentz electron theo- 
ry. PRCRC-QUISITC-S: PH 4353 and familiarity with the 
special theory of relativity and Lagrangian mech- 
anics. 

PH 4403 Advanced Topics in Underwater Acoustics 
(4-1). 

The last in a sequence of courses in acoustics for 
students in the RSLU curriculum, this courses is a 
continuation of PH 3402. Topics include: Review of 
the sonar equations, normal modes in enclosures, 
steady-state response of isospeed acoustic wave- 
guides, propagating and evanescent modes, 
group and phase speeds, the wave equation with 
a source term, the point source in cylindrical co- 
ordinates, transmission loss models for isospeed 
shallow water channel with fluid bottom, the para- 
bolic equation, and the parametric array. Labora- 
tory experiments include analysis of underwater 
noise, normal modes in a rectangular cavity, and 
acoustic waveguides. PR6R6QUISIT6: PH 3402 or 
consent of Instructor. 

PH 4410 Advanced Acoustics Laboratory (0-6). 
Rdvanced laboratory projects in acoustics. PR€- 
R€QUISIT€: PH 3452 or equivalent. 
PH 4453 Sound Propagation in the Ocean (4-0). 
Rn advanced treatment of propagation in the 
ocean. Reflection of spherical wave from ocean 
boundaries. Normal mode propagation of sound; 
the inhomogeneous wave equation and the point 
source in cylindrical coordinates, shallow water 
channel with penetrable bottom, deep sound chan- 
nel, UJK8 approximation. Range-dependent chan- 
nels; adiabotic normal modes, parabolic equation. 
Scattering of sound from rough surfaces and in a 
random ocean; frequency amplitude and phase 
fluctuations, multipath propagation, PR€R€Q- 
UlSITeS: PH 3452 or consent of Instructor. 
PH 4454 Transducer Theory and Design (3-2). 
R treatment of the fundamental phenomena basic 
to the design of transducers for underwater sound, 
specific examples of their application and design 
exercises. Topics include piezoelectric, magne- 
tostricitive and hydromechanical effects. Labora- 
tory includes experiments on measurement tech- 
niques, properties of transducer materials, charac- 
teristics of typical transducer types, and a design 
project. PR6R6QUISITC-: PH 3452, or consent of 
Instructor. 

PH 4456 Seminar in Application of Underwater 
Sound (3-0). 

R study of current literature on application of 
acoustics to problems of Naval interest. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6: PH 3406 or PH 3452 or PH 4403. 

PH 4459 Shock Waves and High-Intensity Sound 

(3-0). 

Nonlinear oscillations and waves on strings. The 
nonlinear acoustic wave equation and its solution. 
The parametric array. The physics of shock waves in 
air and in water. PR6RC-QUISIT6: PH 3451. 



PH 451 5 Physics of the Satellite environment (4-0). 
R graduate level treatment of the structure and 
properties of the space environment. Topics cover- 
ed are chosen from: Geomagnetic field and its vari- 
ations, composition and dynamics of the upper 
atmosphere, natural and artificial radiation belts, 
solar emissions and their influence on the near 
earth space environment. PR6R6QUISITCS: R 3000 
level course in electromagnetism. Some back- 
ground in plasma physics is desirable. 

PH 4531 Introduction to Astrophysics (4-0). 
Introduction to theories of stellar structure, energy 
transport in stars, and stellar evolution. Recent ad- 
vances in astrophysics will be discussed. PRCRC-Q- 
UISIT6: Consent of Instructor. 
PH 4661 Plasmo Physics I (4-0). 
This course constitutes a broad study of the be- 
havior and properties of gaseous plasma, the 
fourth — and most abundant — state of matter in 
the universe. Plasma physics is a vigorously de- 
veloping branch of contemporary physics. Its many 
applications are in areas such as astro and space- 
physics, atomic physics, magneto-hydrodynamic 
power generation, electron beam excited laser, la- 
ser isotope enrichment, ionospheric communica- 
tion, thermonuclear fusion, and high energy beam 
weapons. The physical concepts fundamental to 
various branches of plasma physics are introduced. 
Topics covered include single particle motions in 
electromagnetic fields, orbit theory, collision phe- 
nomena, breakdown in gases, and diffusion. The 
magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid plasma 
models are considered. PRCR6QUISIT6S: PH 3360, 
PH 3782, PH 3683, or the equivalent. 
PH 4662 Plasma Physics II (3-0). 
R continuation of Plasma Physics I. Rpplications of 
the hydromagnetic equations to the study of mac- 
roscopic motions of plasma, equilibrium and stabil- 
ity. Classification of plasma instabilities. Kinetic 
theory, the Soltzmann equation and the macro- 
scopic momentum transport equation. Plasma os- 
cillations and Landau damping. Nonlinear effects, 
shock waves, radiations from plasma, including 
bremsstrahlung and cyclotron radiation. Controlled 
fusion and laser produced plasmas. PRC-RC-QUI- 
SIT6S: PH 4353, PH 4661 or equivalent. 
PH 4663 Advanced Plasma Physics (3-0). 
Selected topics in plasma physics, such as laser- 
target interaction, dynamics of a laser-produced 
plasma, self-generated magnetic fields, plasma 
surface interactions, unipolar arcing, light scat- 
tering and absorption in plasma, turbulence and 
fluctuations, collisionless shock waves. PRCR6Q- 
UISIT6: PH 4662 or consent of Instructor. 
PH 4750 Radiation effects in Solids (4-2). 
Cnergy loss of radiation in matter, radiation dosim- 
etry, energy transfer of radiation to matter, theory 
and spectra of radiation from nuclear weapons, 
fireball development, electromagnetic pulse 
phenomena, displacements of atoms in solids, 



195 



PHVSICS 



radiation damage to solid-state devices. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6S: PH 28 1 0, PH 3352. and PH 3683, or equiva- 
lents. 

PH 4751 Semiconductor Physics (3-1). 
Basic physics of semiconductor devices. Sand mod- 
el of solids, carriers (holes and electrons), Fermi 
function, description of diodes, device fabrication 
techniques, current and capacitance, various dop- 
ing distributions, transistors. There is a problem 
session-lab demonstration. PR6R6QUISIT6S: PH 
3683 or PH 2641 of consent of Instructor. 
PH 4760 Solid Stote Physics (4-0). 
Fundamental theory and related laboratory experi- 
ments dealing with solids: crystals, binding energy, 
lattice vibration, dislocations and mechanical prop- 
erties, free electron theory, band theory, prop- 
erties of semi-conductors and insulators, magne- 
tism. PR€R6QUISIT€S: PH 3683 and PH 3782 (the 
latter may be taken concurrently). 

PH 4771-4772 Statistical Physics l-ll (3-0). 
Kinetic theory and the Roltzmann theorem, con- 
figuration and phase space, the Uouville theorem, 
ensemble theory, microcanonical, canonical and 
grand canonical ensembles, quantum statistics. Ap- 
plication to molecules, 8ose-€instein gases, Fermi- 
Dirac liquids, and irreversible processes. PR€R€Q- 
UISIT6S: PH 3152, PH 3683, and PH 3782. 
PH 4856 Physics of Nuclear explosions (4-1 ). 
This second course in the nuclear uueapon effects 
graduate specialization sequence considers in- 
depth questions of uueapon designs and their spe- 
cific output environments which are created by the 
nuclear explosion. Topics are: principles affecting 
weapon yield efficiency; explosion phenomen- 
ology in various ambient environments, blast and 
shock, thermal radiation. X-rays and gamma rays, 
neutron fluxes, electromagnetic pulse, radioactive 
fallout models. PR6R6QUISIT6S: PH 3855 and 
S€CR€T clearance. 

PH 4857 Nudear Weapon effects and Hardening 
Technologies (4-0). 

This third course in the nuclear weapon effects 
graduate specialization sequence considers in de- 
tail the effects which nuclear weapon explosion en- 
vironments have on various defense platforms and 
systems. Methods of hardening to reduce system 
vulnerability are considered in each of the effect 
areas: blast and shock, thermal radiation, transient 
effects on electronics, €MP, biological effects from 
contamination, atmospheric and ionospheric ef- 
fects on communication, detection and surveillance 
systems. PR6R6QUISIT6S: PH 4856, PH 3461 and 
S€CR€T clearance. 

PH 4881 Advanced Nudear Physics (3-0). 
Topics selected from: relativistic mechanics, scat- 
tering of electrons from nuclei, nuclear models, nu- 
clear potentials, relativistic treatment of the elec- 
tron using the Dirac equation and application to 
electron scattering to develop the Mott cross- 
section,- treatment of form-factors arising from elec- 



tron-nucleon and electron-nucleus scattering; appli- 
cation of electron scattering to study the structure 
of nucleon matter and the study of nucleon models. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: An upper division course in nuclear 
physics. 

PH 4885 Reactor Theory (3-0). 
The diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons. 
Homogeneous thermal reactors, time behavior; re- 
actor control. Multigroup theory- Heterogeneous 
systems. PR6R6QUISIT6S: An upper division course 
in nuclear physics. 

PH 4911 Simulations of Complex Systems (3-1). 
Analysis of the elements of the large simulations, 
such as SCSS, which are routinely used in the con- 
ceptual testing and validation of proposed new 
military systems, practice in the use of large models 
written by others, and sensitization to the pitfalls 
inherent in such models. 

The model chosen must address the communica- 
tions and computer interfacing problems encoun 
tered in the integration of new devices into existing 
systems. The course will include discussions of and 
hands-on experience in the: 

1. verification of large models, 

2. validation of large models, 

3. exercise of large models, 

4. design of simulation experiments, 

5. analysis of outcomes, 

6. preparation of simulation based reports. 
PR6R6QUISIT6: PH 3911. 

PH 4971 Quantum Mechanics I (4-0). 
PH 4972 Quantum Mechanics II (3-0). 

PH 4973 Quantum Mechanics III (3-0). 
Review of Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations of 
motion. Poisson brackets. General principles of 
nonrelativistic quantum mechanics; stationary 
states. Addition of angular momenta; time-inde- 
pendent and time-dependent perturbation theory; 
scattering theory; identical particles and spin. Gen- 
eral principles of relativistic quantum mechanics; 
properties and solutions of relativistic wave equa- 
tions. PR6R6QUISIT6S: PH 3683, PH 31 52. 

PH 4984 Advanced Quantum Physics (4-0). 
This graduate level course covers "formal" quantum 
mechanics in the Dirac format. Additional topics 
include group theory with applications to selection 
rules and crystal fields, variation principles, self- 
consistent fields in the many-electron atom, scat- 
tering theory, and polyatomic molecules. PR6R6Q- 
UISIT6: PH 3683. 

PH 4991 Relativity and Cosmology (3-0). 
€instein's general theory of relativity. The three 
classical tests. The Schwarzchild singularity and 
black holes. Cosmological models and their rela- 
tions with observations. Introduction to modern 
developments; gravitational waves, Dicke's theory, 
problems of quantum cosmology and superspace. 
PR€R€QUISIT€:PH4371. 



196 



PHVSICS 



PH 4998 Special Topics in Advanced Physics ( 1 -0 to 
4-0). 

Study in one of the fields of advanced physics and 
related applied areas selected to meet special 
needs or interests of students. The course may be 
conducted as a seminar or supervised reading. The 
course carries a letter grade and may be repeated 
in different topics. PR6R6QUISIT6: Consent of the 
Department Chairman. It may also be taken on a 
Pass/fail basis if the student has requested so at 
the time of enrollment. 

CHCMISTRV 

Upper Division Course 

CH 2001 General Principles of Chemistry (3-2). 
R study of the fundamentals underlying the chemi- 
cal behavior of matter. Current theories of atomic 
structure and chemical bonding, elementary physi- 
cal chemistry, including chemical equilibria, kinetics 
and electro-chemistry. The laboratory period will 
be used for physico-chemical experiments or for 
problem work, as is deemed appropriate by the 
Instructor. 



or reception of electromagnetic energy. Topics 
treated in the course include: the electromagnetic 
spectrum and its usage, principles of electronic 
reconnaissance, antennas and their characteristics, 
factors affecting receiver sensitivity, transmission 
range, radar principles, the radar equation, optics 
fundamentals, infrared nomenclature, and princi- 
ples and elements of photographic science. 



Upper Division or Graduate Course 

S€ 3004 LUeopons System Analysis (4-0). 
This course is designed to support the Intelligence 
Curriculum. It treats the behavior of weapons sys- 
tems as influenced by the physical properties of 
the environment and the physical properties of the 
devices incorporated into the systems. The course 
material includes: Clectro-optical systems, with 
some background in semiconductors, Sonar, Non- 
acoustic RSUJ (Rntisubmarine UJarfare), and navi- 
gation by means of satellites. PR6RCQUISITCS: SC- 
2002, C-C 2003. 



Upper Division or Graduate Course 

CH 3998 Special Topics in Intermediate Chemistry 
(1-0 to 4-0). 

Study in one of the fields of intermediate chemistry 
selected to meet special needs or interests of stu- 
dents. The course may be conducted as seminar or 
supervised reading and carries a letter grade. It 
may be repeated in different topics. PRCRC-QUISITC-: 
Consent of the Department Chairman. It may also 
be taken on Pass/Fail basis if the student has re- 
quested so at the time of enrollment. 

Graduate Course 

CH 4998 Special Topics in Advanced Chemistry ( 1 -0 
to 4-0). 

Study in one of the fields of advanced chemistry or 
related applied areas selected to meet special 
needs or interest of students. The course may be 
conducted as seminar or supervised reading, car- 
ries a letter grade and may be repeated in dif- 
ferent topics. PRCR6QUISITC-: Consent of Depart- 
ment Chairman. It may also be taken on Pass/Fail 
basis if the student has requested so at the time 
of enrollment. 



SCI€NC€ AND €NGIN€€MNG 

Upper Division Course 

S€ 2002 electromagnetic Systems (4-0). 
This course is designed to support the Intelligence 
curriculum by providing an overview of the princi- 
ples, concepts and trade-offs underlying systems 
whose operations requires the transmission and/ 



Graduate Courses 

S€ 4006 Technical Assessment and Intelligence 
Systems (4-0). 

This course is designed to support the Intelligence 
curriculum. It treats the role of intelligence in sup- 
port of the DoD Planning, Programming and Bud- 
geting System, the U.S. and Soviert Military R 5i D 
Systems, current technical trends affecting military 
capabilities, and current and projected capabilities 
of ocean surveillance and technical intelligence 
systems. PRC-RC-QUISITC-: TOP S6CR6T clearance 
with access to Special Intelligence Information. 

S€ 4401 Underwater Sound, Systems, and Counter- 
measures (3-2). 

R study of the principles of underwater sound prop- 
agation, and the design and operational character- 
istics of underwater sound systems. Cmphasis is 
placed on various measures used to interfere with 
and to deceive active and passive Sonar systems, 
and the techniques used to counter this interfer- 
ence. Topics studied include: sensor arrays, acous- 
tic quieting, signal processing, and examples of ac- 
tive and passive underwater acoustic systems, in- 
cluding acoustic countermeasures. PRCR6QUISIT6S: 
PH 2203, U.S. Citizenship and SCCR6T clearance. 

S€ 4858 Nuclear UJarfare Analysis (4-0). 
This final course in the nuclear weapon effects 
graduate specialization sequence deals with tech- 
nical aspects of strategic and tactical nuclear war. 
Rs much as possible, quantitative considerations 
will be stressed. PRCR6QUISIT6S: PH 4857 or PH 
3006 or equivalent; S6CR6T clearance. 



197 



SPAC6 SVST6MS 



SPfiC€ SVST6MS flCfiD€MK GROUP 



Chairman: 

Alien 6. Funs, Distinguished Professor, 
Code 72, Holligon Hall, Room 275, 
(408) 646-2948, FIV 878-2948. 

The Space Systems Academic Group is on 
interdisciplinary association of faculty, con- 
sisting of twelve members representing eight 
separate academic disciplines. An academic 
group is a less formal organization than an 
academic department, and each professor in 
the group has an appointment in an academic 
department. The Space Systems Academic 
Group has administrative responsibility for 
the academic content of the Space Systems 
Operations and the Space Systems engineer- 
ing Programs of Study. Teaching in these mul- 
tidisciplinary programs is carried out by facul- 
ty members attached to the following aca- 
demic departments: Administrative Sciences, 
Aeronautics, Electrical and Computer engi- 
neering, Mathematics, Meteorology, Ocean- 
ography, Operations Research and Physics. 
Thesis topics for students in this area of study 
are approved by the group and the final 
thesis is approved by the Chairman. 

GROUP FRCIUTICS 

To provide laboratory and experimental 
experience, several facilities have been 
developed. The Solar Simulator Laboratory, 
located in Halligan Hall, consists of apparatus 
and computers to test solar cells and deter- 
mine performance parameters such as power 
and efficiency. In a joint project with the Phys- 
ics Department, the UNAC has been used to 
irradiate solar cells, and the resultant degra- 
dation has been measured. 

The Laser Damage Facility, located in Span- 
agel Hall, is a joint Physics and Space Sys- 
tems laboratory. The laboratory has a 9joule 
pulsed carbon dioxide laser which can create 
laser supported detonation waves as well as 
other phenomena. A vacuum facility allows 
testing specimens in a simulated space envi- 
ronment. 

The Navigation Satellite Receiver Labora- 
tory is a joint Oceanography and Space Sys- 
tems facility. Students can use the receiver 
to obtain positional and velocity information 
using the Global Positioning Satellite. Other 
navigational receivers are operated by the 
electrical and Computer engineering Depart- 
ment. 



Many theses written by Space Systems 
students are classified. To provide secure 
computing facilities as well as secure word 
porcessing, the Space Systems Secured Com- 
puting Facility is available for use by faculty 
and students as required. 



D€GR€€ R€QUIR€M€NTS 

The Space Systems engineering students 
earn a Master of Science Degree in electrical 
and Computer engineering. Refer to degree 
requirements as listed by the Department 
of electrical And Computer engineering. 

The Space Systems Operations students 
are awarded the degree of Master of Science 
in Systems Technology (Space Systems 
Operations). A minimum of 45 quarter hours 
of graduate level work of which at least 1 5 
hours must represent courses at the 4000 
level. Graduate courses in at least four dif- 
ferent academic disciplines must be included, 
and, in two disciplines, a course at the 4000 
level must be included. Space Systems Oper- 
ations curriculum has a series of Space-unique 
and/or Space-oriented courses. These re- 
quired courses fulfil the requirement of three 
courses constituting advanced study in an 
area of specialization, each student is re- 
quired to write a thesis which is space-ori- 
ented. The study program must be approved 
by the Chairman of the Space Systems Aca- 
demic Group. 

GROUP COURSC Of WRINGS 

SS 00 1 Space Systems Seminars and Field Trips 

(0-1). 

Seminars consist of lectures to provide perspective 
on Space Systems. Field trips expose the student 
to various space activities such as industry, NRSR 
and DoD laboratories and commands. 

SS 0810 Thesis Research (0-0). 

€very student conducting thesis research enrolls in 

this course. 

SS 2001 Military Operations in Space I (4-0). 
fln overvieuj of space systems from the Military 
point of view. Provides introduction to and a per- 
spective on military role in space, the supporting 
technologies and sciences, and the missions and 
systems. 



198 



SPAC6 SVST6MS 



Upper Division or Graduate Courses 

SS 3001 Military ftp plications of Space (4-0). 
examination of the military functions which utilize 
space systems and the capabilities of current sys- 
tems, impact of space operations on military strat- 
egy, doctrine and tactics. Notional space policy and 
national organizations involved in space policy, 
DoD and service relationships. Tasking and use of 
space systems and ground support elements and 
techniques to reduce vulnerability. Impact of cur- 
rent R&D programs. 



SS 3900 Special Topics in Space Systems (Variable 
Credit up to five hours). 

Directed graduate study either experimental or 
theoretical in nature. PR6R6QUISITC: Consent of 
Chairman of Space Systems Rcademic Group. 



Graduate Courses 
SS 4001 Decisions and Space Systems (4-0). 
Cost-Performance Rnalysis including mission anal- 
ysis, measures of performance, and cost models. 
Study of the evolution of the interaction of tech- 
nology, economics, and politics in determining 
space related activities. Discussion of the militari- 
zation of space issue. PR6R6QUISITC-S: SS 3001, 
OS 3008. 

SS 4002 Military Operations in Space, li (4-0). 
Operation of space systems to achieve mission 
objectives. Periods of vulnerability. Launch win- 
dows. Satellite defense: hardening, maneuver, 
encryption, covert spores, etc. RSRT operations. 
Launch windows. LUeapons in space and threats to 
space systems. PR6R6QUISITCS: SS 2001. 
SS 4900 Advanced Study in Spoce Systems (Vari- 
able Credit up to five hours). 
Directed graduate study based on journal litera- 
ture, experimental projects, or other sources. PR6- 
R6QUISIT6: Consent of Chairman of Space Systems 
Rcademic Group. 




199 



FACULTY 



FflCULTV 



DISTINGUISH€D PROFCSSORS 



DV6R, JOHN NORVai ( 1 961 ) Distinguished Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1960). 
FUHS, RLLCN 6UGCNC (1966) Distinguished Professor of Reronautics and Space Systems 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology ( 1 958). 
GRV6R, DONRLD PRUL, JR. (1970) Distinguished Professor of Operations Research 

Ph.D., Princeton University (1956). 
MRRTO, PRUL JRMCS ( 1 965) Distinguished Professor of Mechanical engineering 

Sc. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( 1 965). 
SRRPKRVR, TURGUT (1 967) Distinguished Professor of Mechanical engineering 

Ph.D., University of Iowa (1954). 
THRLCR, GCORGC- JULIUS (1951 ) Distinguished Professor of electrical and Computer engineering 

D. C-ng., Johns Hopkins University ( 1 947). 



RCGUIRR FACULTY- 

D€PflRTM€NT OF RDMINISTRRTIV€ SCI€NC€S 

RBDCK-HRMID, TRR6K ( 1 986) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., MIT Sloan School of Management (1984). 
BOG6R, DRN CRLVIN ( 1 979) Associate Professor of economics 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1979). 
BUI, TUNG XURN ( 1 984) Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems 

Ph.D., New Vork University (1985). 
CRRRICK, PRUL MRRSHRLL ( 1 969) Rssociate Professor of Management 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1956). 
DOLH, DRNICL R. ( 1 982) Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems 

Ph.D., University of Rrizona (1982). 
DUKC, JRMCS ROBCRT, JR., LCDR, US. NRW ( 1 985) Instructor of financial Management 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School 
eOVANG, CARSON HRN ( 1 974) Rssociate Professor of Management 

Ph.D., Stanford University (1976). 
eUSKC, KCNNCTH JRMCS ( 1 978) Rssociate Professor of Recounting 

Ph.D., Rrizona State University (1978). 
CV6RC-D, ROGC-R D6NNIS ( 1 979) Professor of Rdministrative Sciences 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Rngeles (1973). 
FR6MG6N, JRMCS MORGRN (1965) Professor of Recounting 

D.B.R., Indiana University (1961). 
FR6LU, BRRRV RLB6RT, LCDR, U.S. Navy (1984) Instructor of Information Systems 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1974). 
GRCCR, LUILLIS ROSLU6LL, JR. (1982) Professor of Recounting 

Ph.D., University of Michigan (1971). 
HRRG, 6RN6ST V6RNON, Captain, U.S. Navy (1984) Instructor of Organizational Behavior 

M.S., University of Southern California ( 1 980). 
H6ND6RSON, DRVID ( 1 984) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Rngeles (1976). 
HORTON, FCNN CLARK (1964) Rssociate Professor of economics 

Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School (1968). 
HUDSON, TIMOTHV PATRICK, Major, U.S. Marine Corps (1986) Instructor of Anancial Management 

M.S. Naval Postgraduate School ( 1 980). 
JONCS, CARL RUSSCLL (1965) Professor of Information and Telecommunications Systems 

Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School (1965). 
LIRO, SHU SHCNG ( 1 977) Professor of Recounting 

Ph.D., University of Illinois (1971). 
LVONS, NORMAN ROB6RT ( 1 979) Associate Professor of Management Information Systems 

Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University (1972). 

200 



FACULTY 



MRTTH6WS, DflNNV GCRRLD, LCDR, Supply Corps, U.S. Navy (1986) Instructor of Recounting 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1983). 

McCRFFC-RV, J€RRV L€€ (1984) Professor of Public Budgeting 

Ph.D., University of UJisconsin (1972). 
McCLAIN, JOHN FRANKLIN III, CDR, U.S. Navy ( 1 985) . . . Instructor of Requisition and Contract Management 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School ( 1 977). 
McGONIGRL, RICHRRD RUIN, LCDR, U.S. Navy (1985) . .Instructor of Requisition and Contract Management 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School ( 1 982). 
M6HRV, ST6PH6N ( 1 986) Associate Professor of economics 

Ph.D., University of California (1973). 
MOOR6, THOMRS ( 1 986) Rssistant Professor of Operations Research 

Ph.D., Virginia Tech (1985) 
MOS6S, ORRIN DOUGLAS ( 1 986) Rssistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of California, Los Rngeles (1983). 
ROB6RTS, NRNCV ( 1 986) Rssociate Professor of education 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
SRN MIGU6L, JOS€PH GIRRRD (1 982) Professor of Recounting 

Ph.D., University of Texas (1972). 
SCHNC-IDC-LUIND, NORMRN FLOVD ( 1 971 ) Professor of Computer Science 

D.8.R., University of Southern California ( 1 966). 
SOLNICK, LORCN MICHR6L ( 1 985) Rssociate Professor of Labor economics 

Ph.D., University of Illinois (1973). 
SUCHRN, JRMCS 6DLURRD (1 986) Rssociate Professor of Managerial Communications 

Ph.D., University of Illinois ( 1 980). 
THOMAS, GeORGC UJILLIRM ( 1 978) Rssociate Professor of economics 

Ph.D., Purdue University (1971). 
LUeiTZMRN, RONRLD RLFR6D (1 971 ) Rssociate Professor of Physchology 

Ph.D., Princeton University ( 1 959). 
LUHIPPLC, DRVID RICHRRD, JR., ( 1 971 ) Professor of economics and Policy Rnalysis 

Ph.D., University of Kansas (1971 ). 

D€PRRTM€NT OF R6RONRUTICS 

BRLL, ROBCRT 6DUJIN (1967) Professor 

Northuuestern University (1962). 
BeLL, RICHRRD UJILLIRM ( 1951 ) Professor 

California Institute of Technology (1958). 
BIBLARZ, OSCAR (1968) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 968). 
BODAPATI, SATVA (1986) Associate Director, NAW-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics 

Ph.D., University of Cambridge (1975). 
COLLINS, DANICL JOS6PH (1967) Professor 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology (1961). 
GAUJAIN, THeODORC HCNRV (1951 ) Professor 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( 1 944). 
HeRLeV, JRMCS VRL6NTIN6 ( 1 983) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Southern California (1969). 
H6RRD, CH6ST6R RRTHUR, LCDR, U.S. Navy (1984) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1977). 
KOLRR, RRM6SH (1 985) Rssistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Rrizona (1984). 
LRVTON, DONRLD M6RRILL ( 1 965) Rssociate Chairman and Professor 

M.S., Princeton University (1954). 
LINDSCV, GCRRLD HCRBCRT (1965) Professor 

Ph.D.,. California Institute of Technology (1963). 
MILLC-R, JRMCS RVCRV (1963) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology (1963). 
N6TZCR, DRVID UJILLIS ( 1 968) Professor 

Ph.D., Purdue University (1968). 
PLRTZ6R, MRX FRRNZ (1970) Chairman and Professor 

Dr. Tech. Science, Technical University of Vienna, Rustria (1964). 

201 



FACULTY 



SHR66VC, RflVMOND PRRMOUS ( 1 971 ) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Washington (1970). 
UJU, C-DWRRD MING-CHI ( 1 984) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Illinois (1965). 
ZUCK6R, ROB6RT DI6F6NDORF (1 965) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Rrizono (1966). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF COMPUT€R SCI€NC€ 

RDRMS, RICHRRD R., MRJ, USRF ( 1 986) Rssistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbano (1986). 
8RKC-R, GRRV S., CDR, U.S. Navy (1985) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1981). 
8RRDL6V, GORDON H. ( 1 973) Professor 

Ph.D., Northwestern University (1967). 
CRLLRHRN, PRUL UJ.. LCDR, U.S. Navy ( 1 983) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1979). 
DRV1S, DRNICl I ( 1 983) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology ( 1 969). 
FRSS, LCONR F. ( 1 986) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (1980). 
HSIRO, DRV1D K. ( 1 982) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (1968). 
KODRC-S, UNO R. (1963) Professor 

Ph.D., Iowa State University (1958). 
LUM, VINC6NT V. (1985) Chairman and Professor 

Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana (1966). 
MRCIC-NNRN, 8RUC6 J. ( 1 979) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Purdue University (1975). 
McGHCC, ROB6RT B. ( 1 986) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Southern California (1963). 
RRUT6NB6RG, RONRLD €., LCDR, U.S. Naval Reserve ( 1 984) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1980). 
RRUJUNSON, LINDR C, CDR, U.S. Navy ( 1 985) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1980). 
ROUJ6, NCIl C. (1983) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 983). 
UJU, C. THOMRS ( 1 985) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California, San Diego (1983). 
ZVDR, MICHR6L J. (1 984) Rssistant Professor 

D.Sc., Washington University (1984). 



D€F€NS€ R€SOURC€S MfiNGG€M€NT €DUCflTION C€NT€R 

BLRCKBURN, LINWOOD 6., Major, U.S. Rrmy ( 1 985) Instructor 

M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute (1980). 
8LRNDIN, JRMC-S SH6RMRN ( 1 974) Rssociate Professor and executive Director 

Ph.D., University of Oregon (1974). 
BOVNTON, ROB6RT 6DWRRD (1970) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 968). 
BRUBRKC-R, CARL ROV (1983) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Washington (1964). 
CONRRD, DONRLD HCNRV, ITC, U.S. Rrmy ( 1 985) Instructor 

M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology (1972). 
DRWSON, JOHN CDWRRD (1 966) Professor 

D.P.R., Syracuse University (1971). 
FRCD6RIKSCN, P6T6R CRRL (1974) Rssociate Professor and Rssistant Director for Academic Programs 

Ph.D., Washington State University (1974). 
LaCIVITR, CHRRLCS JOHN (1985) Rssistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Santa Barbara (1981 ). 

202 



FACULTY 



MORRIS, JAM6S H. (1982) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Oregon (1976). 
PIROG, ROB6RT LCLUIS (1983) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., Columbia University ( 1 978). 
ROB6RTS, DAVID CHARLCS (1980) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Southern California ( 1 976). 
VAUGHN, LARRV €., LCDR, Supply Corps, U.S. Navy (1985) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1974). 
VON PAGCNHARDT, ROB6RT (1967) Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 970). 
WALL, K6NT D. (1985) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota (1971). 
UJRAV, TC-RRV L, LCDR, U.S. Navy (1986) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1979). 
VOHANNAN, FRANK, LTCOL, U.S. Marine Corps (1985) Instructor 

M.B.A., University of Colorado (1981). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF €l€CTRICfll RND COMPUT€R €NGIN€€RING 

ABBOT, LARRV UJAVNC (1984) Assistant Professor 

D. €ng., University of Kansas (1984). 
BRC-IDA, STCPH6N (1958) Associate Professor 

M.S.6.6., Purdue University (1954). 
BUKOFZC-R, DANI6L ( 1 980) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis (1979). 
BROUJN, THOMAS JAV, MAJ., U.S. Air Force (1984) Instructor 

M.S., Air Force Institute of Technology (1973). 
COTTON, MITCHCLL LAV6TT6 (1953) Associate Professor 

€.€., University of California at Berkeley (1954). 
CRISTI, ROB6RTO ( 1 985) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 
DUFFIN, JOHN H6NRV (1962) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1959). 
CLUING, G6RALD DCAN ( 1 963) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Oregon State University ( 1 964). 
GCRBA, ALGC, JR. (1959) Associate Professor 

M.S. University of Illinois (1957). 
HIPPC-NSTI6L, RALPH (1986) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., New Mexico State University ( 1 985). 
KIRK, DONALD 6VAN ( 1 965) Professor 

Ph.D., Cornell University ( 1 965). 
KNORR, J6FFR6V (1970) Professor 

Ph.D., Cornell University ( 1 970). 
LC-€, CHIN-HLUA (1982) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara. 
L66, HUNG-MOU (1982) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., Harvard University (1981). 
LOOMIS, H6RSCH6LL (1 981 ) Professor 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1963). 
MICHACL, SHCRIF (1983) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of UJest Virginia (1983). 
MOOSC-, PAUL HCNRV (1980) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of LUashington (1970). 
MORGAN. MICHACL ALL6N (1979) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1976). 
MVCRS, GLCN ALLCN (1965) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University (1965). 
PANHOLZ6R, RUDOLF ( 1 964) Professor 

D.Sc., Technische Hochschule in Graz, Austria (1961). 
PARK6R, SVDNCV RICHARD ( 1 966) Professor 

Sc.D., Stevens Institute of Technology ( 1 964). 

203 



FflCULTV 



POWCRS, JOHN PATRICK (1 970) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara (1970). 
RIGflS, HRRRIC-TT 8. ( 1 984) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Kansas (1963). 
STRUM, ROB6RT D6NNV ( 1 958) Professor 

M.S., University of Santa Clara (1964). 
TITUS, HRROLD RRTHUR ( 1 962) Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University (1962). 
THC-RRI6N. CHRRL6S WILLIAM ( 1 984) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( 1 969). 
UJARD. JOHN ROBC-RT (1962) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Sydney (1958). 
ZIOMCK, LAWRCNC6 JflMC-S ( 1 982). Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Univerity (1981). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF MflTH€MRTICS 

DANICLSON. DONALD ALFRCD (1985) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Harvard University (1968). 
FRANK6, RICHARD HOMCR ( 1 970) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Utah ( 1 970). 
FRC-DRICKSC-N, HAROLD M. ( 1 980) Chairman and Professor 

Ph.D., University of Southern California ( 1 968). 
JAVACHANDRAN, TOKC- (1967) Professor 

Ph.D., Case Institute of Technology ( 1 967). 
KOVACH, LADIS DANICL (1967) Professor 

Ph.D., Purdue University (1951). 
LATTA. GORDON 6RIC (1979) Professor 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology (1951). 
LUCAS, KCNN6TH ROBC-RT (1958) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Kansas ( 1 957). 
M6NDCZ, RAUL H6RNAN (1 981 ) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1971). 
MORRIS, GCORG6 LUILUAM (1968) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles (1957). 
N6TA, B€NV ( 1 985) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University (1977). 
OUJ6N, GUILLCRMO ( 1 983) Professor 

Ph.D., Princeton University ( 1 962). 
RUSSAK, IRA B€RT (1972) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles (1967). 
SCHOC-NSTADT, ARTHUR LORING (1 970) Professor 

Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1968). 
TRAHAN, DONALD H6RB6RT ( 1 966) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh (1961). 
LU6IR, MAURICC- D6AN (1969) Associate Professor 

D.A., Carnegie-Mellon University ( 1 970). 
UJILD6, CARROLL ORVILL6 (1968) Professor 

Ph.D.. University of Illinois (1964). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF M€CHRNIOH €NGIN€€RING 

CANTIN, GILL6S (1960) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley (1968). 
CHALL6NG6R, K6NN6TH DAVID (1979) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati (1973). 
CHANG, UANG-UJ6V (1985) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., Purdue University ( 1 984). 
HCAL6V, ANTHONV (1986) Professor 

Ph.D., Sheffield University, United Kingdom (1966). 
JOSHI. VOG6NDRA (1 986) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (1984). 

204 



FnCUlTY 



K6LL6H6R, MRTTHC-LU D6NNIS ( 1 986) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dome (1966). 
UGRfiNI, PHILLIP M6R6DITH (1984) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University (1980). 
McN6LL€V, T6RRV ROB6RT ( 1 976) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 973). 
NUNN, ROB6RT HRRRV ( 1 968) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California, Davis (1967). 
P€RKINS, RRTHUR J6FFR6V ( 1 972) Professor 

Ph.D., Cose UJestern Reserve University (1969). 
PUCCI, PRUL FRRNCIS ( 1 956) Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 955). 
SRLINRS, DRVID ( 1 970) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., University of California, Los Rngeles (1968). 
SHIN, VOUNG SIK (1981 ) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., Case UJestern Reserve University (1971). 
SMITH, DRVID LC-6 ( 1 983) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University (1979). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF M€T€OROLOGV 

CHRNG, CHIH-P6I ( 1 972) Professor 

Ph.D., University of LUoshington (1972). 
DRVIDSON, K6NNCTH L. ( 1 970) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Michigan (1970). 
DURKC-6, PHILIP R. (1984) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota (1984). 
€URS, KRISTINC C, LCDR, U.S. Novy ( 1 986) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School" (1985). 
6LSBCRRV, RUSS6LL L ( 1 968) Professor 

Ph.D., Colorado State University ( 1 968). 
HRN6V, ROB6RT L. ( 1 970) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Rngeles (1971). 
RCNRRD, ROB€RT J. ( 1 952) Professor 

Ph.D., Florida State University ( 1 970). 
SHRLU, LUILURM J. (1983) Assistant Professor 

University of LUoshington (1982). 
VRN D€R BIJL, LUILLCM (1961 ) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., State University, Utrecht ( 1 952). 
UJRSH, CRRLVLC- H. ( 1 980) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., University of LUisconsin (1978). 
LUILURMS, ROG6R T. ( 1 968) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Rngeles (1963). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF NOTIONAL S€CURITV AFFAIRS 

RMOS, JOHN LUILURM, II (1 970) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1972). 
BLRNDIN, SH6RMRN, JR. ( 1 968) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Santo Clara (1977). 
BUCHRNRN, PRUL G. ( 1 985) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of Chicago ( 1 985). 
CLOUGH, MICHRCL LUILURM ( 1 979) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1983). 
KRRTCHNC-R, K6RRV M. ( 1 984) Assistant Professor 

M.A., University of Southern California (1983). 
LAURRNC6, CDLURRD JOHN ( 1 972) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (1973). 
LOONCV, ROB6RT 6DLURRD ( 1 979) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis (1969). 
MRGNUS, RRLPH HRRRV ( 1 976) Rssociote Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1971). 

205 



FACULTY 



OLS€N, 6DWARD ALL6N ( 1 980) Associate Professor and Chairman 

Ph.D., The American University ( 1 974). 
PARK6R. PATRICK JOHNSTON (1974) Professor 

M.B.A., University of Chicago (1955). 
ST6RNB6RG, JOS6PH (1985) Professor 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University (1955). 
SKXFI, RUSSCL H€NRV (1966) Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University (1966). 
TC-TI, FRANK MICHA6L ( 1 966) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Syracuse University ( 1 966). 
TRITT6N, JAMCS JOHN, CDR, U.S. Navy ( 1 986) Assistant Professor and Acting Chairman 

Ph.D., University of Southern California (1984). 
VOST, DAVID SCOn (1 979) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Southern California (1976). 

D€PflRTM€NT OF OC€RNOGRRPHV 

BATT66N, MARV LOUISC- ( 1 984) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., Oregon State University ( 1 984). 
BOURK6, ROBCRT HRTHRUJAV ( 1 971 ) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Oregon State University ( 1 972). 
GARUJOOD, ROLAND WILLIAM, JR. (1976) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Washington (1976). 
MOO€RS, CHRISTOPH6R NORTHRUP K6NNARD (1979) Professor 

Ph.D., Oregon State University (1969). 
NVSTU€N, J6FFR6V (1986) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., UCSD (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) (1985). 
RAMP. STCVCN R. (1986) Assistant Professor 

M.S., University of Washington (1976). 
S6MTN6R, RLB6RT J. (1986) Professor 

Ph.D.. Princeton University ( 1 973). 
SMITH. DAVID C. IV (1985) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D.. Texas ASM University (1980). 
THORNTON. 6DWARD B. (1 969) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Florida (1970). 
TUCKCR. ST€V€NS PARRINGTON (1 968) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D.. Oregon State University ( 1 972). 
SCHA€F€R, GLCN RICHARD, CPT, NOAA Corps (1983) Instructor 

M.S., University of Wisconsin ( 1 974). 
VON SCHWIND, JOSC-PH JOHN (1967) Associate Professor 

Ph.D.. Texas ASM University. 

D€PflRTM€NT OF OP€RATIONS R€S€ARCH 

ANDRUS, ALV1N FRANCIS (1963) Associate Professor 

M.A.. University of Florida at Gainsville ( 1 958). 
BARR, DONALD ROV (1966) Professor 

Ph.D., Colorado State University ( 1 965). 
BOG6R, DAN CALVIN (1979) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1979). 
BROWN, G6RALD GCRARD (1 973) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles (1974). 
C-AGLC. JAM6S NORFL€€T. II (1982) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 975). 
6SARV, JAM6S DANI6L (1970) Professor 

Ph.D.. University of California at Berkeley ( 1 957). 
FORR6ST, ROB6RT NCRGLC (1964) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Oregon ( 1 959). 
GAFFORD, JACK BURTON. LTC. U.S. Army (1984) Instructor 

M.S.. Naval Postgraduate School (1976). 
HUTCHINS, CHARLCS W.. CDR. U.S. Navy (1982) Instructor 

Ph.D., Ohio State University (1970). 

206 



FflCULTV 



JACOBS, PATRICIA ANN€ (1978) Associate Professor 

Ph.D.. Northwestern University (1973). 
LARSON. HAROLD JOSCPH (1962) Professor 

Ph.D., Iowa State University (1960). 
L6LUIS, P€T€R ADRIAN LUALT6R (1971 ) Professor 

Ph.D.. University of London ( 1 964). 
LINDSAV, GL6NN FRANK (1965) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Ohio State University (1966). 
McMAST€RS, ALAN UJAYNC (1965) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1966). 
MILCH, PAUL ROBERT (1963) Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University (1966). 
MITCH6LL, MARK, LCDfl, U.S. Navy ( 1 985) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1983). 
NAKAGAUJA, GORDON ROSS, CPT, U.S. Navy (1 985) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School. 
N6IL. DOUGLAS C-LM6R (1972) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University (1971). 
PARRV, SAMU6L HOLUARD ( 1 972) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Ohio State University (1971). 
P6RRV, FRANK MARCHMAN. LTC, U.S. Army (1983) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School ( 1 975). 
POOCK, GARV KC-NT (1967) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1967). 
PURDU6, P€T€R (1986) Professor and Chairman 

Ph.D., Purdue University ( 1 972). 
R€AD. ROBCRT RICHARD ( 1 961 ) Professor 

Ph.D.. University of California at Berkeley (1957). 
RICHARDS. FRANCIS RUSSCLL ( 1 970) Associate Professor 

Ph.D.. Clemson University (1971). 
ROCKOUJ6R, CDLUARD B. ( 1 986) Associate Professor 

Ph.D.. Brandeis University (1971). 
RON€N. DAVID (1986) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Ohio State University (1980). 
ROSC-NTHAL. RICHARD 6DLUIN (1985) Associate Professor 

Ph.D.. Georgia Institute of Technology ( 1 975). 
SHUB6RT, BRUNO OHO (1969) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 968). 
SHUDD6. R€X HAUJKINS ( 1 962) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1956). 
SOV6RC-IGN, MICHA€L GRAHAM (1970) Professor 

Ph.D., Purdue University ( 1 965). 
STCLUART, JOS6PH STANL6V, II, CDR, U.S. Navy ( 1 984) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1973). 
SULLIVAN. TIMOTHV JOHN, CDR, U.S. Navy ( 1 984) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1973). 
TAVLOfl. JAMC-S GROV6R ( 1 968) Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 966). 
UJASHBURN, ALAN ROBC-RT (1 970) Professor 

Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology ( 1 965). 
LUOOD, ROGC-R K6V1N ( 1 982) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1982). 
UJOODS, LUALT6R MAX (1962) Professor 

Ph.D.. Stanford University (1961). 

D€PARTM€NT OF PHVSICS 

ARMST6AD, ROB6RT LOUIS ( 1 964) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1964). 
ATCHLCV, ANTHONV A. (1985) Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of Mississippi ( 1 985). 



207 



FACULTY 



8USKIRK, FR6D RAMON ( 1 960) Professor 

Ph.D., Cose Institute of Technology (1958). 
COOP6R. RLFRCD WILLIAM MRDISON ( 1 957) Professor 

Ph.D., The Queen's University of Belfast (1961). 
COPPCNS, RLRN BCRCHARD ( 1 964) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Cornell University (1965). 
DRHL, HRRV6V RRNOLD ( 1 964) Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., Stanford University ( 1 963). 
GRRRCTT, STCVCN LURIC ( 1 982) Assistant Professor 

University of California at Los Rngeles (1977). 
HRRRISON, DON CDLURRD, JR. (1961 ) Professor 

Ph.D., Vole University (1953). 
HCINZ, OTTO (1962) Professor 

University of California at Berkeley (1954). 
ING8CR, L6ST6R (1 986) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at San Diego (1966). 
MILNC-, C-DMUND ALCXRNDCR ( 1 954) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology (1953). 
NCIGHBOURS, JOHN ROBCRT (1959) Professor 

Case Institute of Technology ( 1 953). 
NC-TZORG, GR6GORV B6RTMRN ( 1 984) Instructor 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1977). 
SRNDCRS, JAM6S V1NCCNT ( 1 961 ) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Cornell University (1961). 
SCHRCH6R, GORDON CVCRCTT ( 1 964) Professor 

Ph.D., Rutgers (1961). 
SCHWIRZKC, FRC-D RICHRRD ( 1 967) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Karlsruhe ( 1 959). 
UJRUC-RS, DONRLD L€€ ( 1 983) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Kansas State University (1971). 
UJILSON, OSCRR BRVRN, JR. ( 1 957) Professor 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Rngeles (1951). 
LUOC-HL6R, KRRLHC-INZ 6DGRR ( 1 962) Professor 

Ph.D., University of Munich (1962). 
Z6L6NV, LUILLIRM BRRDUJCLL ( 1 962) Rssociate Professor 

Ph.D., Syracuse University ( 1 960). 




208 



&V ^f * 










IND€X 



ncodemic Profile Code (APC) 

Definition 16 

Accreditations 7 

Administrative Staff 18, 19 

Admissions Procedures 15-18 

Awards 10-12 

Board of Advisors 19 

Calendar, Academic 3 

Chief of Naval Operations 4 

Computer Facilities 22 

Continuing education Program 23, 24 

Counseling Service, Academic 17 

Course Alpha Prefix Codes 

by Department 1 4, 98 

Curricula Conducted at Other 

Universities 95 

Curricula at the Postgraduate School 27 

Administrative Science 

(Management — Material Movement; 
Transportation; Acquisition and Contract; 
Allied Officers, DOD Civilian, USA, USMC, 
and USCG: Systems Inventory; Material 
Logistics Support; Financial; Manpoujer, 
Personnel and Training Analysis; 

Organization Development 29-43 

Aeronautical engineering 44-47 

Air-Ocean Sciences 48-54 

Antisubmarine LUarfare 55, 56 

Command, Control and 

Communications (C3) 60-62 

Communications engineering 68, 69 

Computer Sdence 58, 59 

Computer Sustems 57, 58 

electronics Systems engineering 63, 64 

electronic LUarfare Systems 

Technology 67, 68 

engineering electronics 63, 64 

Hydrographic Sciences 53, 54 

Intelligence 81, 82 

Meteorology 48, 49 

Notional Security Affairs 73-81 

Naval engineering 83, 84 

Nuclear Physics (LUeapons & effects) . . . 91-93 
Oceanography 52, 53 



Operational Oceanography 51, 52 

Operations Analysis 85-87 

Space Systems engineering 65, 66 

Space Systems Operations 61, 62 

Telecommunications Systems Mgt 70-72 

Underuuater Acquistics Systems 93, 94 

LUeapons Systems engineering 88, 89 

UJeapons Systems Science 90, 91 

Curricular Offices 20, 25 

Administrative Science 29-43 

Aeronautical engineering 44-47 

Air-Ocean Sciences 48-54 

Command, Control and 

Communications (C3) 60-62 

Computer Technology 57-59 

electronics and Communications 63-72 

National Security Affairs/ 

Intelligence 73-82 

Naval engineering 83,84 

Operations Analysis 85-87 

LUeapons engineering 88-94 

Degrees 7, 8 

Degree Requirements 

General 7, 8 

Aeronautical engineering 1 1 0, 1 1 1 

Applied Mathematics or with Major 

in Mathematics 141 

Applied Science 141 

Computer Science 121 

electrical & Computer engineering ... 128, 129 

engineering Acoustics 140 

engineering Science 147, 1 48, 187 

Hydrographic Sciences 1 72 

Information Systems 99 

Management 1 00 

Mechanical engineering 1 47, 1 48 

Meteorology 1 54 

Meteorology and Oceanography ... 1 55, 1 73 

National Security Affairs 160, 161 

Oceanography 1 72 

Operations Research 1 78, 1 79 

Physics 187 

Systems Systems 1 98 

Systems Technology 1 1 9, 1 20 

Telecommunications Systems 

Management 1 00 



209 



IND6X 



Deportments and Course Descriptions. 

flcodemic 97 

Administrative Sciences Dept 99-109 

Information Systems 99, 101-103 

Management 100. 103-109 

Service Courses 1 00, 1 01 

Telecommunications Systems Mgt 101 

Aeronautics Dept 110-118 

Aeronautics 113-117 

Weapons engineering and Space 

Science 1 1 7, 1 1 8 

Antisubmarine Warfare Group 119 

Systems Technology 119 

Command, Control and Communications 

(C3) Group 120 

C3 120 

Computer Science Dept 1 21 -1 27 

Computer Science 1 21 -1 27 

electrical and Computer Engineering 

Dept 128-138 

€€ for Engineering and Science .... 1 30-136 
€€ Interdisciplinary 1 36-1 38 

electronic Warfare Group 1 39 

electronic Warfare 1 39 

engineering Acoustics Programs 1 40 

Mathematics Dept 141-146 

Mathematics 1 42-1 46 

Mechanical engineering Dept 147-153 

Materials Science 1 52, 1 53 

Mechanical engineering 148-1 52 

Meteorology Dept 1 54-1 59 

Meteorology 1 56-1 59 

Notional Security Affairs Dept 160-171 

National Security Affairs 161-171 



Oceanography Dept 1 72-1 77 

Hydrographic Sciences 1 76, 1 77 

Oceanographic Sciences 1 73-1 76 

Operations Research Dept 1 78-186 

Operations Analysis 1 79-1 83 

Service Courses 1 83-1 86 

Physics Dept. 187-197 

Chemistry 1 97 

Physics 188-197 

Science and engineering 197 

Space Systems Group 1 98 

Facilities at the Postgraduate School 21-24 

Faculty 199-208 

Federal Civilian education Program 18, 23 

Foundation, Naval Postgraduate 

School 6, 1 9 

Grades 13 

History of the Postgraduate School 6 

Information, General 5-24 

Library 21 

Mission 5 

Organizations and Functions of the 

Postgraduate School 20 

Registration 14 

Statistics 9 

Student Council 21 

Transfer of Credits 18 



210 



naval 
postgraduate 

SCHOOL 

MONT€R€V, CRUFORNin 




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